A Brief History of Los Alamitos Rossmoor

Author: Larry Strawther
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 1614237743
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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The city of Los Alamitos and the contiguous, unincorporated community of Rossmoor exemplify small-town America amid the populous western Orange County sprawl. Their tree-lined streets, well-kept homes and first-rate schools are reflected in Rossmoor's selection as the No. 1 suburb in California (and No. 9 nationwide) in a 2012 study by Coldwell Banker Realty. The evolution of Los Alamitos from cattle ranches and sugar beet factory town to World War II military town and ultimately into residential neighborhoods took a century. Meanwhile, the planned "walled 'city' of Rossmoor" was created between 1955 and 1961. Despite annexation talk, Rossmoor and "Los Al" coexist apart together, so to speak, on Long Beach's outskirts. Author Larry Strawther traces the histories of these interdependent sister communities, which epitomize the reality in the legend of the Orange County lifestyle.

Seal Beach A Brief History

Author: Larry Strawther
Publisher: History Press Library Editions
ISBN: 9781540223463
Format: PDF, Kindle
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The wooden pier, tree-lined Main Street and ocean views, coupled with a prosperous and happy community, led Forbes "magazine to name Seal Beach one of the five friendliest towns in America. Getting there, however, was a bumpy adventure. Starting in the 1860s as Anaheim Landing, the first seaport in what would become Orange County, it soon became a summer retreat for squatters and illegal saloons. Despite the efforts of real estate developers to turn the town into an amusement resort and an early center for aviation and motion pictures, Seal Beach became neighboring Long Beach's tavern, brothel and gambling destination. But order and prosperity eventually prevailed to create today's quiet residential city. Join author Larry Strawther as he tracks Seal Beach's evolution from raucous port to cherished community."

Houses for a New World

Author: Barbara Miller Lane
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 0691167613
Format: PDF, Kindle
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While the work of Frank Lloyd Wright, Richard Neutra, and their contemporaries frequently influences our ideas about house design at the midcentury, most Americans during this period lived in homes built by little-known builders who also served as developers of the communities. Often dismissed as “little boxes, made of ticky-tacky,” the tract houses of America’s postwar suburbs represent the twentieth century’s most successful experiment in mass housing. Houses for a New World is the first comprehensive history of this uniquely American form of domestic architecture and urbanism. Between 1945 and 1965, more than thirteen million houses—most of them in new ranch and split-level styles—were constructed on large expanses of land outside city centers, providing homes for the country’s rapidly expanding population. Focusing on twelve developments in the suburbs of Boston, Philadelphia, Chicago, and Los Angeles, Barbara Miller Lane tells the story of the collaborations between builders and buyers, showing how both wanted houses and communities that espoused a modern way of life—informal, democratic, multiethnic, and devoted to improving the lives of their children. The resulting houses differed dramatically from both the European International Style and older forms of American domestic architecture. Based on a decade of original research, and accompanied by hundreds of historical images, plans, and maps, this book presents an entirely new interpretation of the American suburb. The result is a fascinating history of houses and developments that continue to shape how tens of millions of Americans live. Featured housing developments in Houses for a New World: Boston area: Governor Francis Farms (Warwick, RI) Wethersfield (Natick, MA) Brookfield (Brockton, MA) Chicago area: Greenview Estates (Arlington Heights, IL) Elk Grove Village Rolling Meadows Weathersfield at Schaumburg Los Angeles and Orange County area: Cinderella Homes (Anaheim, CA) Panorama City (Los Angeles) Rossmoor (Los Alamitos, CA) Philadelphia area: Lawrence Park (Broomall, PA) Rose Tree Woods (Broomall, PA)

Seal Beach

Author: Larry Strawther
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 1625850352
Format: PDF, ePub
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The wooden pier, tree-lined Main Street and ocean views, coupled with a prosperous and happy community, led "Forbes "magazine to name Seal Beach one of the five friendliest towns in America. Getting there, however, was a bumpy adventure. Starting in the 1860s as Anaheim Landing, the first seaport in what would become Orange County, it soon became a summer retreat for squatters and illegal saloons. Despite the efforts of real estate developers to turn the town into an amusement resort and an early center for aviation and motion pictures, Seal Beach became neighboring Long Beach's tavern, brothel and gambling destination. But order and prosperity eventually prevailed to create today's quiet residential city. Join author Larry Strawther as he tracks Seal Beach's evolution from raucous port to cherished community.

Seal Beach

Author: Laura L. Alioto
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 9780738529806
Format: PDF, ePub
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Situated along the Pacific Coast Highway, Seal Beach is the coastal portal between Los Angeles and Orange Counties. This vacation spot and largely residential community separates the City of Long Beach from the broad, open, southerly beaches of the OC--Sunset, Bolsa Chica, Huntington, Newport, Laguna, and beyond. The regional fame of Anaheim Landing and Anaheim Bay preceded the founding of Bay City, which became Seal Beach after too much mail intended for Bay City found its way to the "City by the Bay," San Francisco. In the early 20th century, the popular Joy Zone was a huge beachside amusement park in Seal Beach enjoyed by thousands of vacationers brought south by the Pacific Electric Red Car Line. This entertaining retrospective documents these landmarks, as well as local residents, events, Seal Beach Pier, the nearby U.S. Naval Weapons Station, and other points of interest.

500 Grammar Based Conversation Questions

Author: Larry Pitts
Publisher: ECQ Publishing
ISBN: 9781942116011
Format: PDF, ePub
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Let's face it, grammar can be boring to teach and can definitely be boring to learn. This book makes grammar lessons more engaging and interesting for "intermediate and advanced" ESL / EFL students. I've handpicked the most commonly taught grammar points "and made conversation questions that allow students to produce the grammar naturally." For each of the grammar points there are short, simple, and easy to understand explanations. You can give these explanations to your students or use them for yourself as a guide or reminder. There are at least 17 questions for each of the grammar points. So your students will have plenty to talk about. Plus, they'll be using the grammar you just taught them in a natural and pain-free way. "So what are the grammar points in the book?" simple past, present perfect, simple present, modals of possibility and probability, gerunds vs. infinitives, modals of necessity, modals of advice, comparatives, conditionals real with the future (first conditional), will, be going to, passive voice in the present, past continuous, reported speech / indirect speech, conditionals unreal with the past (third conditional), conditionals unreal with the present (second conditional), nouns (count / noncount / countable / uncountable), quantifiers, conditionals real with the present (zero conditional), present perfect continuous, superlatives, tag questions, adverbs of frequency, as ... as (equatives), imperatives, passive voice with the past, used to / would, for / since, would rather / prefer. Look familiar? I'm sure you're teaching some of these in your class. I'm also sure that you've taught a lot of these in the past. And you know what? You'll probably be teaching most of these in the future. Wouldn't it be nice to have some extra resources when it's time to teach grammar in your class?

Soaring Skyward

Author: Claudine Burnett
Publisher: AuthorHouse
ISBN: 146703360X
Format: PDF, ePub
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Flying was a perilous adventure, with death only a small breath away. Many lost their lives in pursuit of their dream and have remained relatively forgotten, until now. (italics until now) “Aviation fever” struck young and old alike, especially after the four Dominguez Air Meets held in Southern California between 1910-1913. It inspired many such as the Birnie and French brothers, Charles Day, and Glenn Martin to build their own air ships. For others like Frank Champion, Long Beach’s first airman, it meant learning from the best---traveling to London, England, to study with Louis Bleriot, and going on to teach others, such as Long Beach Airport founder Earl Daugherty, to fly. There were also daring women: Tiny and Ethel Broadwick, who parachuted out of airplanes when many men refused to do so because they considered it “too dangerous;” Gladys O’Donnell instrumental in founding the Women’s Air Derby; World War II ferrying pilots, led by Barbara Erickson London, whose service to America was not recognized until 1977; Dianna Bixby and Joan Merriam Smith trying to complete Amelia Earhart’s dream of circumnavigating the globe. Soaring Skyward (italics for title) introduces remarkable men and women who embraced the dangers and challenges of flight. It also tells the story of the Long Beach Municipal Airport, the center of much of Southern California’s aviation history. The early days of ballooning, air circuses, parachute jumps, barnstorming, air meets, forgotten military sites and much more are all explored in this well documented look into the past, and future, of aviation in Southern California. After twenty years of extensive research, Ms. Burnett’s book is sure to open up new sources of information for aviation and history enthusiasts, and most definitely shed additional light on the past.

Bay City

Author: Leon Katzinger
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 9780738533315
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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In 1831, Alexis de Tocqueville described the Saginaw Valley as the Ã"far westÃ" of our growing nation, predicting that its impenetrable forests would soon be felled, and its river would be lined with quays and filled with vessels. Influential settlers soon began to confirm those predictions, including the Trombleys, who arrived in 1831 and built the Trombley House in 1837. Albert Miller platted Portsmouth in 1836Ã--and Lower Saginaw, now known as Bay City, was platted the same year. Throughout the 20th century, majestic buildings were erected, schools, homes, and churches were established, and Bay City developed into a wonderful place to live, work, and raise a family.