A Court Divided

Author: Mark V. Tushnet
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 9780393058680
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Download Now
In this authoritative reckoning with the eighteen-year record of the Rehnquist Court, Georgetown law professor Mark Tushnet reveals how the decisions of nine deeply divided justices have left the future of the Court; and the nation; hanging in the balance. Many have assumed that the chasm on the Court has been between its liberals and its conservatives. In reality, the division was between those in tune with the modern post-Reagan Republican Party and those who, though considered to be in the Court's center, represent an older Republican tradition. As a result, the Court has modestly promoted the agenda of today's economic conservatives, but has regularly defeated the agenda of social issues conservatives; while paving the way for more radically conservative path in the future.

The Rehnquist Legacy

Author: Craig Bradley
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521859196
Format: PDF, Mobi
Download Now
This book is a legal biography of William Rehnquist of the U. S. Supreme Court.

In the Balance Law and Politics on the Roberts Court

Author: Mark Tushnet
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393241432
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Download Now
An examination of the initial years of the Roberts Court and the intellectual battle between Roberts and Kagan for leadership. When John Roberts was appointed chief justice of the Supreme Court, he said he would act as an umpire. Instead, his Court is reshaping legal precedent through decisions unmistakably—though not always predictably—determined by politics as much as by law, on a Court almost perfectly politically divided. Harvard Law School professor and constitutional law expert Mark Tushnet clarifies the lines of conflict and what is at stake on the Supreme Court as it hangs “in the balance” between its conservatives and its liberals. Clear and deeply knowledgeable on both points of law and the Court’s key players, Tushnet offers a nuanced and surprising examination of the initial years of the Roberts Court. Covering the legal philosophies that have informed decisions on major cases such as the Affordable Care Act, the political structures behind Court appointments, and the face-off between John Roberts and Elena Kagan for intellectual dominance of the Court, In the Balance is a must-read for anyone looking for fresh insight into the Court’s impact on the everyday lives of Americans.

Out of Range

Author: Mark V. Tushnet
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199813711
Format: PDF, ePub
Download Now
Few constitutional disputes maintain as powerful a grip on the public mind as the battle over the Second Amendment. The National Rifle Association and gun-control groups struggle unceasingly over a piece of the political landscape that no candidate for the presidency--and few for Congress--can afford to ignore. But who's right? Will it ever be possible to settle the argument? In Out of Range, one of the nation's leading legal scholars takes a calm, objective look at this bitter debate. Mark V. Tushnet brings to this book a deep expertise in the Constitution, the Supreme Court, and the role of the law in American life. He breaks down the different positions on the Second Amendment, showing that it is a mistake to stereotype them. Tushnet's exploration is honest and nuanced; he finds the constitutional arguments finely balanced, which is one reason the debate has raged for so long. Along the way, he examines various experiments in public policy, from both sides, and finds little clear evidence for the practical effectiveness of any approach to gun safety and prosecution. Of course, he notes, most advocates of the right to keep and bear arms agree that it should be subject to reasonable regulation. Ultimately, Tushnet argues, our view of the Second Amendment reflects our sense of ourselves as a people. The answer to the debate will not be found in any holy writ, but in our values and our vision of the nation. This compact, incisive examination offers an honest and thoughtful guide to both sides of the argument, pointing the way to solutions that could calm, if not settle, this bitter dispute.

The Warren Court and American Politics

Author: L. A. Scot Powe
Publisher: Belknap Press
ISBN:
Format: PDF, Docs
Download Now
In learned and lively narrative, Powe discusses over 200 significant rulings of the Supreme Court under Chief Justice Earl Warren, especially the explosive "Brown" decision, which fundamentally challenged the Southern way of life. 13 halftones.

Neoconservative Politics and the Supreme Court

Author: Stephen M. Feldman
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814764665
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Download Now
In this concise, timely book, constitutional law expert Stephen M. Feldman draws on neoconservative writings to explore the rise of the neocons and their influence on the Supreme Court. Neocons burst onto the political scene in the early 1980s via their assault on pluralist democracy’s ethical relativism, where no pre-existing or higher principles limit the agendas of interest groups. Instead, they advocated for a resurrection of republican democracy, which declares that virtuous citizens and officials pursue the common good. Yet despite their original goals, neocons quickly became an interest group themselves, competing successfully within the pluralist democratic arena. When the political winds shifted in 2008, however, neocons found themselves shorn of power in Congress and the executive branch. But portentously, they still controlled the Supreme Court. Neoconservative Politics and the Supreme Court explains how and why the neoconservatives criticized but operated within pluralist democracy, and, most important, what the entrenchment of neocons on the Supreme Court means for present and future politics and law.

The Rehnquist Court and Criminal Justice

Author: Christopher E. Smith
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 0739140825
Format: PDF
Download Now
By analyzing the perspectives and influential decisions of individual justices on the Rehnquist Court (1986-2005), this volume reveals how a divided Supreme Court limited the scope of rights affecting criminal justice without fulfilling conservatives' goal of eliminating foundational concepts established during the Warren Court era. The era's generally conservative Supreme Court preserved rights in several contexts because individual justices do not necessarily view all constitutional rights issues through a simple, consistent philosophical lens.

The Constitution in Wartime

Author: Mark Tushnet
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822386909
Format: PDF
Download Now
Most recent discussion of the United States Constitution and war—both the war on terrorism and the war in Iraq—has been dominated by two diametrically opposed views: the alarmism of those who see many current policies as portending gross restrictions on American civil liberties, and the complacency of those who see these same policies as entirely reasonable accommodations to the new realities of national security. Whatever their contributions to the public discussion and policy-making processes, these voices contribute little to an understanding of the real constitutional issues raised by war. Providing the historical and legal context needed to assess competing claims, The Constitution in Wartime identifies and explains the complexities of the important constitutional issues brought to the fore by wartime actions and policies. Twelve prominent legal scholars and political scientists combine broad overviews of U.S. history and contemporary policy with detailed yet accessible analyses of legal issues of pressing concern today. Some of the essays are broad in scope, reflecting on national character, patriotism, and political theory; exploring whether war and republican government are compatible; and considering in what sense we can be said to be in wartime circumstances today. Others are more specific, examining the roles of Congress, the presidency, the courts, and the international legal community. Throughout the collection, balanced, unbiased analysis leads to some surprising conclusions, one of which is that wartime conditions have sometimes increased, rather than curtailed, civil rights and civil liberties. For instance, during the cold war, government officials regarded measures aimed at expanding African Americans’ freedom at home as crucial to improving America’s image abroad. Contributors. Sotirios Barber, Mark Brandon, James E. Fleming, Mark Graber, Samuel Issacharoff, David Luban, Richard H. Pildes, Eric Posner, Peter Spiro, William Michael Treanor, Mark Tushnet, Adrian Vermeule

Constitutional Politics in a Conservative Era

Author: Austin Sarat
Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing
ISBN: 0762314869
Format: PDF, ePub
Download Now
This volume of "Studies in Law, Politics, and Society" presents a unique special issue "Constitutional Politics in a Conservative Era." This issue brings together the work of leading scholars of Constitutionalism, Constitutional law, and politics in the United States to take stock of the field to chart its progress, and point the way for its future development. Much of the way Americans have thought about Constitutional law has, until recently, been dominated by models developed during the Warren Court Era. Today, however, scholars seek new approaches, approaches that do not take for granted liberal hegemony in the courts. Among these, theories of popular constitutionalism and judicial minimalism appear to be increasingly popular. How should Scholars think about American courts in an era of conservative domination of the judiciary? What should/will constitutional politics in the United States look like over the next decade?

Making Constitutional Law

Author: Mark V. Tushnet
Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand
ISBN: 0195093143
Format: PDF, Mobi
Download Now
Following on Making Civil Rights Law, which covered Thurgood Marshall's career from 1936-1961, this book focuses on Marshall's career on the Supreme Court from 1961-1991, where he was first Afro-American Justice. The first book on Justice Thurgood Marshall's years on the Supreme Court based on a comprehensive review of the Supreme Court papers of Justices Marshall and William J. Brennan, this work describes Marshall's special approach to constitutional law in areas ranging from civil rights and the death penalty to abortion and poverty. It also describes the Supreme Court's operations during Marshall's tenure, the relations among the justices, and the particular roles played by Chief Justice Warren Burger, Justice Brennan, and Justice Antonin Scalia. The book locates the Supreme Court's actions from 1967 to 1991 in a broader historical and political context, explaining how Marshall's liberalism became increasingly isolated on a Court influenced by nation's drift in a more conservative direction.