A History of the Holocaust

Author: Rita Steinhardt Botwinick
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1315508311
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Told with scrupulous attention to detail and accuracy, this text provides important background information on Jewish life in Europe, the functions of the hierarchy within the Nazi government, and the psychological foundations of prejudice. Unlike other texts on the subject, A History of the Holocaust gives students an idea of just who the victims of the Holocaust were. In fact, the author tells this story from a unique point-of-view, having experienced Nazi Germany as a child.

A History of the Holocaust

Author: Rita Steinhardt Botwinick Ph.D.
Publisher: Pearson Higher Ed
ISBN: 0205969364
Format: PDF, ePub
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This is the eBook of the printed book and may not include any media, website access codes, or print supplements that may come packaged with the bound book. Examines the causes of the Holocaust and the people involved. Told with scrupulous attention to detail and accuracy, this text provides important background information on Jewish life in Europe, the functions of the hierarchy within the Nazi government, and the psychological foundations of prejudice. Unlike other texts on the subject, A History of the Holocaust gives students an idea of just who the victims of the Holocaust were. In fact, the author tells this story from a unique point-of-view, having experienced Nazi Germany as a child. Learning Goals Upon completing this book readers will be able to: Describe the sequence of events that led to the Holocaust Understand the people that were victims of the Holocaust and the ways they responded to the events as they unfolded Draw their own conclusions about controversial topics related to the Holocaust

A Holocaust Reader

Author: Rita S. Botwinick
Publisher: Pearson College Division
ISBN:
Format: PDF, Docs
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This unique book presents selections of original material related to the Holocaust, including documents, memoirs, and other primary sources that allows readers an unfiltered, firsthand means of evaluating the causes, events, and results of the Holocaust. A Holocaust Reader includes material excerpted from documents and memoirs that is intended to supplement information generally available on the Holocaust. It also includes an index, uncommon in anthologies. An essential reference book for anyone studying the Holocaust for personal or professional reasons.

Architects of Annihilation

Author: Gotz Aly
Publisher: Weidenfeld & Nicolson
ISBN: 1474602746
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Architects of Annihilation follows the activities of the demographers, economists, geographers and planners in the period between the disorderly excesses of the November 1938 pogrom and the fully-effective operation of the gas chambers at Auschwitz in summer 1942. The authors, both journalists and historians, argue that this group of intellectuals, often combining academic, civil service and Party functions, made an indispensable contribution to the planning and execution of the Final Solution. More than that, in the economic and demographic rationale of these experts, the Final Solution was only one element in a far-reaching programme of self-sufficiency which privileged the German Aryan population.

Visions of Annihilation

Author: Rory Yeomans
Publisher: University of Pittsburgh Pre
ISBN: 0822977931
Format: PDF
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The fascist Ustasha regime and its militias carried out a ruthless campaign of ethnic cleansing that killed an estimated half million Serbs, Jews, and Gypsies, and ended only with the defeat of the Axis powers in World War II. Rory Yeomans analyzes the Ustasha movement's use of culture to appeal to radical nationalist sentiments and legitimize its genocidal policies. He shows how the movement attempted to mobilize poets, novelists, filmmakers, visual artists, and intellectuals as purveyors of propaganda and visionaries of a utopian society. Yeomans chronicles the foundations of the movement, its key actors and ideologies, and reveals the unique conditions present in interwar Croatia that led to the rise of fascism.

The Holocaust and Memory in the Global Age

Author: Daniel Levy
Publisher: Temple University Press
ISBN: 9781592132768
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Can collective memories of the past shape the future? If one of the fears about a globalized society is the homogenization of culture, can it nevertheless be true that the homogenization of memory might have a positive impact on political and cultural norms? Originally published in Germany, The Holocaust and Memory in the Global Age examines the nature of collective memory in a globalized world, and how the memory of one particular event - the Holocaust - helped give rise to an emerging global consensus on human rights. Daniel Levy and Natan Sznaider show how memories of the Holocaust have been de-contextualized from the original event and offer a framework for interpreting contemporary acts of injustice such as ethnic cleansing and genocide. Representations of mass atrocities in Bosnia and Kosovo during the 1990s resonated with iconographies of the Holocaust and played a significant role in the political and military interventions in the Balkans. Subsequently, these representations have had a crucial impact on the consolidation of international human rights and related issues of transitional justice, reparations, and restitution.

Nazism and War

Author: Richard Bessel
Publisher: Modern Library
ISBN: 9780307558527
Format: PDF
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The Second World War was the defining event of the twentieth century, leaving millions dead and redrawing the political map in ways that continue to affect nearly the entire human race. What was unprecedented, however, was not simply the war’s scale, but its causes. Unlike previous territorial or political clashes, the war launched by Nazi Germany was an ideological one, waged to wipe entire peoples and cultures from the face of the earth. In Nazism and War, Richard Bessel, one of the preeminent authorities on the social and political history of modern Germany, demonstrates how racial hatred was the driving force behind–and not a by-product of–Nazism. War was the anvil on which Hitler’s worldview was forged; to him, war was “the most memorable period of my life,” and “all the past fell away into oblivion.” German National Socialism was born in war, emerging triumphant over a country deeply scarred by defeat and eager to reclaim its greatness and to punish those who had usurped it. As a political philosophy, Nazism glorified struggle and conflict, viewing them as the purpose of a nation and a measure of its overall condition. As a political movement and state system, Nazism made its ideology real, plunging the European continent into a war of annihilation and a sea of blood. Nazism–inseparable from war–destroyed the old Europe, and thus helped to create the world in which we live. Incisive, authoritative, and immensely readable, this is an incendiary and forcefully argued work of scholarship that will rank with the most influential historical analyses of our time. From the Hardcover edition.

After Such Knowledge

Author: Eva Hoffman
Publisher: PublicAffairs
ISBN: 1610391357
Format: PDF, Mobi
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As the Holocaust recedes in time, the guardianship of its legacy is being passed on from its survivors and witnesses to the next generation. How should they, in turn, convey its knowledge to others? What are the effects of a traumatic past on its inheritors? And what are the second-generation's responsibilities to its received memories? In this meditation on the long aftermath of atrocity, Eva Hoffman--a child of Polish Jews who survived the Holocaust with the help of neighbors, but whose entire families perished--probes these questions through personal reflections, and through broader explorations of the historical, psychological, and moral implications of the second-generation experience. She examines the subterranean processes through which private memories of suffering are transmitted, and the more willful stratagems of collective memory. She traces the "second generation's" trajectory from childhood intimations of horror, through its struggles between allegiance and autonomy, and its complex transactions with children of perpetrators. As she guides us through the poignant juncture at which living memory must be relinquished, she asks what insights can be carried from the past to the newly problematic present, and urges us to transform potent family stories into a fully informed understanding of a forbidding history.

KL

Author: Nikolaus Wachsmann
Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux
ISBN: 1429943726
Format: PDF
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The first comprehensive history of the Nazi concentration camps In a landmark work of history, Nikolaus Wachsmann offers an unprecedented, integrated account of the Nazi concentration camps from their inception in 1933 through their demise, seventy years ago, in the spring of 1945. The Third Reich has been studied in more depth than virtually any other period in history, and yet until now there has been no history of the camp system that tells the full story of its broad development and the everyday experiences of its inhabitants, both perpetrators and victims, and all those living in what Primo Levi called "the gray zone." In KL, Wachsmann fills this glaring gap in our understanding. He not only synthesizes a new generation of scholarly work, much of it untranslated and unknown outside of Germany, but also presents startling revelations, based on many years of archival research, about the functioning and scope of the camp system. Examining, close up, life and death inside the camps, and adopting a wider lens to show how the camp system was shaped by changing political, legal, social, economic, and military forces, Wachsmann produces a unified picture of the Nazi regime and its camps that we have never seen before. A boldly ambitious work of deep importance, KL is destined to be a classic in the history of the twentieth century.