A Killer Among Us Women of Justice Book 3

Author: Lynette Eason
Publisher: Revell
ISBN: 1441232613
Format: PDF
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Kit Kenyon is a first-rate hostage negotiator. Noah Lambert is a good detective with excellent instincts. The new partners have hardly had time to get used to each other when they are thrown into a grisly murder case. As evidence mounts up and more victims are found, Kit and Noah realize they are on the hunt for a serial killer. The problem is, he's hunting one of them too. With nail-biting suspense, clever plot twists, and a hint of sweet romance, A Killer Among Us is the latest thriller from Lynette Eason. It will keep readers up late as they race to discover the killer--and whether Kit and Noah will live to tell about it.

A Killer Among Us

Author: Charles Bosworth
Publisher: Onyx
ISBN: 9780451408549
Format: PDF, Docs
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Recounts the true story of a twenty-eight-year-old mother of four who was found dead in her own home--murdered execution style by her husband, Rick DeCaro for her $100,000 life insurance policy, and her family's struggle for justice. Original.

Moving Target Elite Guardians Book 3

Author: Lynette Eason
Publisher: Revell
ISBN: 1441236791
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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When Maddy McKay and Quinn Holcombe don't show up for Quinn's surprise birthday party, his friends know that something is very wrong. Their search turns up little beyond evidence that Quinn and Maddy just decided to take off for a long overdue vacation. But it soon becomes apparent that they did not leave of their own accord. Maddy awakens in a cement room with no idea where she is. But it's not long before she realizes she's in the clutches of a madman exacting revenge by hunting. His prey of choice? Humans. Now Maddy and Quinn must run for their lives, hoping to find their killer before the next game begins. Because if they don't win this game, they die. Fast, furious, and flirty, Lynette Eason's relentless suspense barely gives her readers time to catch their breath in this third thrilling installment of the Elite Guardians series.

When a Secret Kills Deadly Reunions Book 3

Author: Lynette Eason
Publisher: Baker Books
ISBN: 1441242155
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Investigative reporter Jillian Carter knows it's time to put the past to rest. She's tired of looking over her shoulder, letting a killer go free. She's no longer the scared kid who changed her name and disappeared. Now, no matter what the cost, Jillian must do what she is trained to do--ferret out the truth and expose it. Senator Frank Hoffman committed murder ten years ago--and Jillian watched it happen. Didn't she? Not even the enigmatic and attractive Colton Brady, her ex-boyfriend and nephew of the killer, will be able to make her leave this alone. Get ready for the spine-tingling, nail-biting conclusion to an explosive series.

No Place to Hide Hidden Identity Book 3

Author: Lynette Eason
Publisher: Revell
ISBN: 1441223290
Format: PDF, ePub
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It's not every day you see your childhood friend and one-time crush on national news. Jackie Sellers just wishes it were under different circumstances. She can't believe that Ian Lockwood is wanted in connection with a terrorist plot, and she's determined to find him and help him clear his name. But she's not the only one looking. The FBI wants him captured. The bad guys want him dead. Ian just wants to stay alive long enough to save thousands of innocent lives. Lynette Eason throws readers right into the action from page one, propelling them along a dangerous road and asking the provocative question of how far we'd be willing to go if we were up against a wall.

On the Edge of Danger

Author: Lynette Eason
Publisher: Revell
ISBN: 1493417460
Format: PDF, Docs
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This is an ebook bundle that contains: Lynette Eason's Always Watching, Lisa Harris' Vendetta and Samuel Parker's Purgatory Road.

The Encyclopedia of Unsolved Crimes Checkmark Books 2004

Author: Michael Newton-Fact on File
Publisher: Bukupedia
ISBN: 0816049807
Format: PDF
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It is not true, as pop star Bonnie Tyler suggests in her hit song “Driving Me Wild,” that everyone loves a mystery. While fictional enigmas exert an enduring appeal, from the Sherlock Holmes adventures penned by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle to the best-selling novels of Patricia Cornwell, real-life mysteries are something else entirely. Police officers and prosecutors hate mysteries, preferring their criminal cases tied up into neat, easily explained packages. Defense attorneys generally share that sentiment—unless a phantom suspect helps win an acquittal in court. Friends and family of crime victims or missing persons crave nothing more than an absence of doubt. Archaeologists, psychologists, medical researchers, “intelligence” agents—all these and more devote their lives to the proposition that no riddle should remain unsolved. And yet . . . These plentiful exceptions notwithstanding, there is something in an unsolved mystery that appeals to many of us. Some go so far as to publicly hope that this or that classic case will never be solved, comparing mysterious cases to gaily wrapped presents forever unopened, never losing their appeal for armchair detectives. When the package is opened, its contents revealed, no amount of excitement or pleasure can ward off the inevitable letdown. We want to see the gift, possess it . . . but perhaps not yet. In the real world, as it happens, unsolved mysteries are distressingly common. The solution rate for U.S. murders has declined from 90-odd percent in the late 1950s to an average 70 percent (and less, in some regions) a half century later. Lesser crimes are even more likely to go unsolved. Fewer than half of all rapes are reported to authorities, much less “cleared” by arrest and conviction. Thousands of thefts go unsolved every year; the number unreported (or unnoticed, for that matter) is unknown. Authorities cannot agree on the number of children who vanish yearly in America, much less on what has become of them. As for missing adults, barring obvious signs of foul play, no agency even attempts to keep track of the lost. In the face of those odds, a curious researcher may be startled to learn how many cases do get solved (albeit slowly in some cases, taking years or even decades). During preparation of this volume, latebreaking investigations forced deletion of various tantalizing cases, including (but not limited to) the following: • A stalker of prostitutes in Vancouver, British Columbia, theoretically linked to the disappearance of 67 victims since the 1970s; • Seattle’s “Green River Killer,” blamed for the deaths of 49 women between 1982 and 1984; • The stabbing deaths of at least eight gay men, murdered around Chesapeake, Virginia, between 1987 and 1995; • A series of hit-and-run murders that claimed two female joggers and a male bicyclist during 1991, in Porterville, California; • New York’s “Last Call Killer,” linked to the slayings of five men, lured from gay bars and dismembered before their remains were scattered along New Jersey highways in 1991–92; • The mysterious deaths of 48 patients at Truman Memorial Veterans Hospital in Columbia, Missouri, between January and August 1992; • The grisly deaths of three Minneapolis prostitutes in 1996, stabbed and beaten before they were doused with gasoline and set afire in Theodore Wirth Park; • The kidnap-murders of three adolescent girls at Spotsylvania, Virginia, in 1996–97. Homicide investigators frequently remind us that the first 24 to 48 hours are critical to solving a crime, but these cases and others like them, cracked long after the fact, serve as a daily reminder that justice is often delayed. “Cold” cases can be solved by discovery of new evidence, by confession—and, increasingly, by the scientific miracle of DNA profiling. That said, what constitutes an unsolved case? Typically, the term applies to a crime in which no suspects are identified, but that need not be the case. Some crimes are “cleared” by arrest and conviction of an innocent suspect, whether by chance or through a deliberate frame-up, thus leaving the real offender at large. Others, some notorious, remain technically unsolved after a known offender was acquitted by a biased or dim-witted jury. In some cases, authorities have branded a suspect as guilty on the flimsiest of evidence and without benefit of trial. Other crimes are “solved” by confessions that, upon closer examination, seem to be the product of police coercion or disordered minds. For purposes of this volume, we shall consider unsolved cases to include: • Crimes in which no suspect is identified; • Cases in which the offender is known to police or the public but cannot be charged for lack of concrete evidence; • Miscarriages of justice, including cases wherein innocent suspects are convicted (or otherwise officially blamed), and those in which guilty parties are wrongfully acquitted. Cases in the text are alphabetically arranged, most often by the victim’s name, although some headers refer to an event (e.g., St. Valentine’s Day Massacre) or to the popular nickname of an unidentified offender (e.g., “Jack the Ripper”). Cases with multiple victims are identified either by the geographical location (e.g., Atlanta child murders) or by some recognized media label (e.g., “Golden Years murders”). Blind entries link individual victims to entries profiling a serial murder or similar crimes (e.g., Eddowes, Catherine: See “Jack the Ripper”). References within the text to subjects possessing their own discrete entries appear in SMALL-CAPITAL LETTERS. Special thanks are owed to David Frasier, friend, author, and reference librarian extraordinaire at Indiana University in Bloomington; to William A. Kingman, for sharing his insight on the case of the New Orleans Axeman; and to Heather Locken. Every effort has been made to ensure accuracy in the text that follows. Anyone with further knowledge of the cases covered—or of unsolved crimes in general—is invited to contact the author, in care of Facts On File. The Encyclopedia of Unsolved Crimes x Entries

Gone in a Flash Ebook Shorts

Author: Lynette Eason
Publisher: Baker Books
ISBN: 1441239812
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Connor and Samantha Wolfe are finally taking their family on a much-deserved vacation aboard a luxurious cruise ship. Unfortunately, crime doesn't take a vacation.

The Encyclopedia of Unsolved Crimes Michael Newton 2009

Author: Fact on File, Inc
Publisher: Bukupedia
ISBN:
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Introduction It is not true, as pop star Bonnie Tyler suggests in her hit song “Driving Me Wild,” that everyone loves a mystery. While fictional enigmas exert an enduring appeal, from the Sherlock Holmes adventures penned by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle to the best-selling novels of Patricia Cornwell, real-life mysteries are something else entirely. Police officers and prosecutors hate mysteries, preferring their criminal cases tied up into neat, easily explained packages. Defense attorneys generally share that sentiment—unless a phantom suspect helps win an acquittal in court. Friends and family of crime victims or missing persons crave nothing more than an absence of doubt. Archaeologists, psychologists, medical researchers, “intelligence” agents—all these and more devote their lives to the proposition that no riddle should remain unsolved. And yet . . . These plentiful exceptions notwithstanding, there is something in an unsolved mystery that appeals to many of us. Some go so far as to publicly hope that this or that classic case will never be solved, comparing mysterious cases to gaily wrapped presents forever unopened, never losing their appeal for armchair detectives. When the package is opened, its contents revealed, no amount of excitement or pleasure can ward off the inevitable letdown. We want to see the gift, possess it . . . but perhaps not yet. In the real world, as it happens, unsolved mysteries are distressingly common. The solution rate for U.S. murders has declined from 90-odd percent in the late 1950s to an average 70 percent (and less, in some regions) a half century later. Lesser crimes are even more likely to go unsolved. Fewer than half of all rapes are reported to authorities, much less “cleared” by arrest and conviction. Thousands of thefts go unsolved every year; the number unreported (or unnoticed, for that matter) is unknown. Authorities cannot agree on the number of children who vanish yearly in America, much less on what has become of them. As for missing adults, barring obvious signs of foul play, no agency even attempts to keep track of the lost. In the face of those odds, a curious researcher may be startled to learn how many cases do get solved (albeit slowly in some cases, taking years or even decades). During preparation of this volume, latebreaking investigations forced deletion of various tantalizing cases, including (but not limited to) the following: • A stalker of prostitutes in Vancouver, British Columbia, theoretically linked to the disappearance of 67 victims since the 1970s; • Seattle’s “Green River Killer,” blamed for the deaths of 49 women between 1982 and 1984; • The stabbing deaths of at least eight gay men, murdered around Chesapeake, Virginia, between 1987 and 1995; • A series of hit-and-run murders that claimed two female joggers and a male bicyclist during 1991, in Porterville, California; • New York’s “Last Call Killer,” linked to the slayings of five men, lured from gay bars and dismembered before their remains were scattered along New Jersey highways in 1991–92; • The mysterious deaths of 48 patients at Truman Memorial Veterans Hospital in Columbia, Missouri, between January and August 1992; • The grisly deaths of three Minneapolis prostitutes in 1996, stabbed and beaten before they were doused with gasoline and set afire in Theodore Wirth Park; • The kidnap-murders of three adolescent girls at Spotsylvania, Virginia, in 1996–97. Homicide investigators frequently remind us that the first 24 to 48 hours are critical to solving a crime, but these cases and others like them, cracked long after the fact, serve as a daily reminder that justice is often delayed. “Cold” cases can be solved by discovery of new evidence, by confession—and, increasingly, by the scientific miracle of DNA profiling. That said, what constitutes an unsolved case? Typically, the term applies to a crime in which no suspects are identified, but that need not be the case. Some crimes are “cleared” by arrest and conviction of an innocent suspect, whether by chance or through a deliberate frame-up, thus leaving the real offender at large. Others, some notorious, remain technically unsolved after a known offender was acquitted by a biased or dim-witted jury. In some cases, authorities have branded a suspect as guilty on the flimsiest of evidence and without benefit of trial. Other crimes are “solved” by confessions that, upon closer examination, seem to be the product of police coercion or disordered minds. For purposes of this volume, we shall consider unsolved cases to include: • Crimes in which no suspect is identified; • Cases in which the offender is known to police or the public but cannot be charged for lack of concrete evidence; • Miscarriages of justice, including cases wherein innocent suspects are convicted (or otherwise officially blamed), and those in which guilty parties are wrongfully acquitted. Cases in the text are alphabetically arranged, most often by the victim’s name, although some headers refer to an event (e.g., St. Valentine’s Day Massacre) or to the popular nickname of an unidentified offender (e.g., “Jack the Ripper”). Cases with multiple victims are identified either by the geographical location (e.g., Atlanta child murders) or by some recognized media label (e.g., “Golden Years murders”). Blind entries link individual victims to entries profiling a serial murder or similar crimes (e.g., Eddowes, Catherine: See “Jack the Ripper”). References within the text to subjects possessing their own discrete entries appear in SMALL-CAPITAL LETTERS. Special thanks are owed to David Frasier, friend, author, and reference librarian extraordinaire at Indiana University in Bloomington; to William A. Kingman, for sharing his insight on the case of the New Orleans Axeman; and to Heather Locken. Every effort has been made to ensure accuracy in the text that follows. Anyone with further knowledge of the cases covered—or of unsolved crimes in general—is invited to contact the author, in care of Facts On File. The Encyclopedia of Unsolved Crimes