A Mighty Long Way

Author: Carlotta Walls Lanier
Publisher: One World
ISBN: 9780345517241
Format: PDF, Kindle
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BONUS: This edition contains an A Mighty Long Way discussion guide. When fourteen-year-old Carlotta Walls walked up the stairs of Little Rock Central High School on September 25, 1957, she and eight other black students only wanted to make it to class. But the journey of the “Little Rock Nine,” as they came to be known, would lead the nation on an even longer and much more turbulent path, one that would challenge prevailing attitudes, break down barriers, and forever change the landscape of America. For Carlotta and the eight other children, simply getting through the door of this admired academic institution involved angry mobs, racist elected officials, and intervention by President Dwight D. Eisenhower, who was forced to send in the 101st Airborne to escort the Nine into the building. But entry was simply the first of many trials. Breaking her silence at last and sharing her story for the first time, Carlotta Walls has written an engrossing memoir that is a testament not only to the power of a single person to make a difference but also to the sacrifices made by families and communities that found themselves a part of history.

A Mighty Long Way

Author: Carlotta Walls Lanier
Publisher: One World
ISBN: 0345511018
Format: PDF
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A personal account of the nation's most famous school integration recounts the author's decision to attend Little Rock's all-white Central High and describes how subsequent events affected her family's beliefs about dedication, perseverance, and sacrifice.

A Mighty Long Way

Author: Carlotta Walls LaNier
Publisher: One World
ISBN: 034551100X
Format: PDF, Mobi
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An insider's account of the nation's most famous school integration recounts how the author made the decision to attend Arkansas's all-white Central High because of geographical practicality rather than a sense of heroism, describing how subsequent events affected her family's beliefs about dedication, perseverance, and sacrifice. By the co-author of the best-selling The Pact.

Little Rock Girl 1957

Author: Shelley Tougas
Publisher: Capstone
ISBN: 0756544408
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Explores and analyzes the historical context and significance of the newspaper photograph of African American Elizabeth Eckford trying to enter Little Rock, Arkansas's all-white Central High School in 1957.

Elizabeth and Hazel

Author: David Margolick
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300141939
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Looks at the lives of the two women at the center of a famous historic photograph taken during the Little Rock school desegregation crisis in 1957--one, a black girl being harrassed by a mob; the other, a white teen at the center of the mob--in a book that discusses how each dealt with the fallout from that fateful day.

Simple Not Easy

Author: Terrence J. Roberts
Publisher: Parkhurst Brothers Incorporated Pub
ISBN:
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Key speeches and public addresses by the noted African-American psychologist and educator reflect the Congressional Gold Medal winner's core values and concerns on such topics as ethics, racism, community, family, education, and the personal impact of being one of the Little Rock Nine in 1957.

No Struggle No Progress

Author: Howard Fuller
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781626000445
Format: PDF, Docs
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This book tells the story of one mans life journey in the heart of the struggle to reform the nation's schools. Fuller has always believed that it is important for poor and working class Black people to gain access to the levers of power dictating their lives. He believes that those of us who are educated and resourceful have a moral and historical responsibility to help them, and that is what he has always tried to do. Early in his life he found truth in the words of the great Frederick Douglass: “Power concedes nothing without a demand. It never did, and it never will.” “So struggle we must” says Fuller. That understanding of the relationship between struggle and progress is what propelled him down dark alleys and dirt roads in some of North Carolina's poorest communities in the 1960s and pushed him into the bush, mountains, and war-torn villages of Africa nearly a decade later.“It is what pushes me still in the fight over one of the most contentious education issues of this era: parental choice. I believe deep in my heart that giving low-income and working class parents the power (and the money) to make choices about the schools their children attend will not only revolutionize education but provide the compass to a better life for the many poor, Black children stuck in failing systems. … Education reform is one of the most crucial social justice issues of our time, and I will spend the rest of my days fighting for my people, most especially those without the power or the resources to fight for themselves.”

The Pact

Author: Sampson Davis
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9781573229890
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Follows the experiences of the authors, three friends who grew up in impoverished families in Newark, New Jersey, and who supported one another in their dreams of becoming doctors in spite of tremendous disadvantages.

Indivisible

Author: Gail Bush
Publisher: Norwood House Press
ISBN: 1603574174
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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"Anthology including over 50 works of poetry by 20th century writers on issues related to social justice in American society. Foreword by COMMON"--

The Class of 65

Author: Jim Auchmutey
Publisher: PublicAffairs
ISBN: 1610393554
Format: PDF
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In the midst of racial strife, one young man showed courage and empathy. It took forty years for the others to join him… Being a student at Americus High School was the worst experience of Greg Wittkamper’s life. Greg came from a nearby Christian commune, Koinonia, whose members devoutly and publicly supported racial equality. When he refused to insult and attack his school’s first black students in 1964, Greg was mistreated as badly as they were: harassed and bullied and beaten. In the summer after his senior year, as racial strife in Americus—and the nation—reached its peak, Greg left Georgia. Forty-one years later, a dozen former classmates wrote letters to Greg, asking his forgiveness and inviting him to return for a class reunion. Their words opened a vein of painful memory and unresolved emotion, and set him on a journey that would prove healing and saddening. The Class of ’65 is more than a heartbreaking story from the segregated South. It is also about four of Greg’s classmates—David Morgan, Joseph Logan, Deanie Dudley, and Celia Harvey—who came to reconsider the attitudes they grew up with. How did they change? Why, half a lifetime later, did reaching out to the most despised boy in school matter to them? This noble book reminds us that while ordinary people may acquiesce to oppression, we all have the capacity to alter our outlook and redeem ourselves.