A New Religious America

Author: Diana L. Eck
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 006175028X
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Why Understanding America's Religious Landscape Is the Most Important Challenge Facing Us Today The 1990s saw the U.S. Navy commission its first Muslim chaplain and open its first mosque. There are presently more than three hundred temples in Los Angeles, home to the greatest variety of Buddhists in the world. There are more American Muslims than there are American Episcopalians, Jews, or Presbyterians.

A New Religious America

Author: Diana L. Eck
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 9780061750281
Format: PDF
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Why Understanding America's Religious Landscape Is the Most Important Challenge Facing Us Today The 1990s saw the U.S. Navy commission its first Muslim chaplain and open its first mosque. There are presently more than three hundred temples in Los Angeles, home to the greatest variety of Buddhists in the world. There are more American Muslims than there are American Episcopalians, Jews, or Presbyterians.

America and the Challenges of Religious Diversity

Author: Robert Wuthnow
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400837243
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Muslims, Hindus, Buddhists, and adherents of other non-Western religions have become a significant presence in the United States in recent years. Yet many Americans continue to regard the United States as a Christian society. How are we adapting to the new diversity? Do we casually announce that we "respect" the faiths of non-Christians without understanding much about those faiths? Are we willing to do the hard work required to achieve genuine religious pluralism? Award-winning author Robert Wuthnow tackles these and other difficult questions surrounding religious diversity and does so with his characteristic rigor and style. America and the Challenges of Religious Diversity looks not only at how we have adapted to diversity in the past, but at the ways rank-and-file Americans, clergy, and other community leaders are responding today. Drawing from a new national survey and hundreds of in-depth qualitative interviews, this book is the first systematic effort to assess how well the nation is meeting the current challenges of religious and cultural diversity. The results, Wuthnow argues, are both encouraging and sobering--encouraging because most Americans do recognize the right of diverse groups to worship freely, but sobering because few Americans have bothered to learn much about religions other than their own or to engage in constructive interreligious dialogue. Wuthnow contends that responses to religious diversity are fundamentally deeper than polite discussions about civil liberties and tolerance would suggest. Rather, he writes, religious diversity strikes us at the very core of our personal and national theologies. Only by understanding this important dimension of our culture will we be able to move toward a more reflective approach to religious pluralism.

The Transformation of American Religion The Story of a Late Twentieth Century Awakening

Author: Amanda Porterfield Professor of Religious Studies University of Wyoming
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0198030088
Format: PDF, Docs
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As recently as a few decades ago, most people would have described America as a predominantly Protestant nation. Today, we are home to a colorful mix of religious faiths and practices, from a resurgent Catholic Church and a rapidly growing Islam to all forms of Buddhism and many other non-Christian religions. How did this startling transformation take place? A great many factors contributed to this transformation, writes Amanda Porterfield in this engaging look at religion in contemporary America. Religious activism, disillusionment with American culture stemming from the Vietnam war, the influx of Buddhist ideas, a heightened consciousness of gender, and the vastly broadened awareness of non-Christian religions arising from the growth of religious studies programs--all have served to undermine Protestant hegemony in the United States. But the single most important factor, says Porterfield, was the very success of Protestant ways of thinking: emphasis on the individual's relationship with God, tension between spiritual life and religious institutions, egalitarian ideas about spiritual life, and belief in the practical benefits of spirituality. Distrust of religious institutions, for instance, helped fuel a religious counterculture--the tendency to define spiritual truth against the dangers or inadequacies of the surrounding culture--and Protestantism's pragmatic view of spirituality played into the tendency to see the main function of religion as therapeutic. For anyone interested in how and why the American religious landscape has been so dramatically altered in the last forty years, The Transformation of Religion in America offers a coherent and persuasive analysis.

Religious Intolerance in America

Author: John Corrigan
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 9780807895955
Format: PDF, Kindle
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American narratives often celebrate the nation's rich heritage of religious freedom. There is, however, a less told and often ignored part of the story: the ways that intolerance and cultures of hate have manifested themselves within American religious history and culture. In the first ever documentary survey of religious intolerance from the colonial era to the present, volume editors John Corrigan and Lynn S. Neal define religious intolerance and explore its history and manifestations, including hate speech, discrimination, incarceration, expulsion, and violence. Organized thematically, the volume combines the editors' discussion with more than 150 striking primary texts and pictures that document intolerance toward a variety of religious traditions. Moving from anti-Catholic Ku Klux Klan propaganda to mob attacks on Mormons, the lynching of Leo Frank, the kidnapping of "cult" members, and many other episodes, the volume concludes with a chapter addressing the changing face of religious intolerance in the twenty-first century, with examples of how the problem continues to this day.

Religious Pluralism in America

Author: William R. Hutchison
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300129572
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Religious toleration is enshrined as an ideal in our Constitution, but religious diversity has had a complicated history in the United States. Although Americans have taken justifiable pride in the rich array of religious faiths that help define our nation, for two centuries we have been grappling with the question of how we can coexist. In this ambitious reappraisal of American religious history, William Hutchison chronicles the country’s struggle to fulfill the promise of its founding ideals. In 1800 the United States was an overwhelmingly Protestant nation. Over the next two centuries, Catholics, Mormons, Jews, Muslims, Hindus, and others would emerge to challenge the Protestant mainstream. Although their demands were often met with resistance, Hutchison demonstrates that as a result of these conflicts we have expanded our understanding of what it means to be a religiously diverse country. No longer satisfied with mere legal toleration, we now expect that all religious groups will share in creating our national agenda. This book offers a groundbreaking and timely history of our efforts to become one nation under multiple gods.

Shopping for Faith

Author: Richard Cimino
Publisher: Jossey-Bass
ISBN: 9780787961046
Format: PDF
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Shopping for Faith is as good as it gets in assessing the U.S. religion scene at millennium's end. Cimino and Lattin present a picture of multiple trends headed in often contradictory directions. —Robert Ellwood, emeritus professor of religion, University of Southern California American religion flourishes in a consumer culture, and presents us with a bewildering array of choices as we navigate the shopping mall of faith. The authors identify dozens of trends which will shape American religion in the next century and bring together the latest research and intimate portraits of Americans describing their beliefs, their religious heritage, and their spiritual search. With warmth and style the authors document how consumerism shapes religious practice -- from conservative evangelical worship to the most esoteric New Age workshop.

Encountering God

Author: Diana L. Eck
Publisher: Beacon Press
ISBN: 0807073040
Format: PDF
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Religion scholar Diana Eck is director of the Pluralism Project, which seeks to map the new religious diversity of the United States, particularly the increasing presence of Hindu, Buddhist, and Muslim communities. In this tenth-anniversary edition of Encountering God, Eck shows why dialogue with people of other faiths remains crucial in today's interdependent world--globally, nationally, and even locally. She reveals how her own encounters with other religions have shaped and enlarged her Christian faith toward a bold new Christian pluralism From the Trade Paperback edition.

The End of White Christian America

Author: Robert P. Jones
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1501122290
Format: PDF
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"The founder and CEO of Public Religion Research Institute (PRRI) and columnist forThe Atlantic describes how white Protestant Christians have declined in influence and power since the 1990s and explores the effect this has had on America,"--NoveList.

Tri Faith America

Author: Kevin M. Schultz
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199987548
Format: PDF, Docs
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In Tri-Faith America, Kevin Schultz explains how the United States left behind the idea that it was "a Protestant nation" and embraced the notion that Protestants, Catholics, and Jews were "Americans all." Schultz describes how the tri-faith idea surfaced after World War I and how, by the end of World War II, the idea was becoming widely accepted. During the Cold War, the public religiosity spurred by the fight against godless communism led to widespread embrace of the tri-faith idea.