A Primer in Social Choice Theory

Author: Wulf Gaertner
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191609897
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Processes of collective decision making are seen throughout modern society. How does a government decide on an investment strategy within the health care and educational sectors? Should a government or a community introduce measures to combat climate change and CO2 emissions, even if others choose not too? Should a country develop a nuclear capability despite the risk that other countries may follow their lead? This introductory text explores the theory of social choice. Social choice theory provides an analysis of collective decision making. The main aim of the book is to introduce students to the various methods of aggregating the preferences of all members of a given society into some social or collective preference. Written as a primer suitable for advanced undergraduates and graduates, this text will act as an important starting point for students grappling with the complexities of social choice theory. With all new chapter exercises this rigorous yet accessible primer avoids the use of technical language and provides an up-to-date discussion of this rapidly developing field.

Mathematics of Social Choice

Author: Christoph Bo”rgers
Publisher: SIAM
ISBN: 0898717620
Format: PDF
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Mathematics of Social Choice is a fun and accessible book that looks at the choices made by groups of people with different preferences, needs, and interests. Divided into three parts, the text first examines voting methods for selecting or ranking candidates. A brief second part addresses compensation problems wherein an indivisible item must be assigned to one of several people who are equally entitled to ownership of the item, with monetary compensation paid to the others. The third part discusses the problem of sharing a divisible resource among several people. Mathematics of Social Choice can be used by undergraduates studying mathematics and students whose only mathematical background is elementary algebra. More advanced material can be skipped without any loss of continuity. The book can also serve as an easy introduction to topics such as the Gibbard-Satterthwaite theorem, Arrow's theorem, and fair division for readers with more mathematical background.

Measuring Inequality

Author: Frank Cowell
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199594031
Format: PDF, Kindle
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This book deals with the theoretical and practical problems involved in measuring the extent of inequality. The book covers modern theoretical developments in inequality analysis, and shows how the way we think about inequality has been shaped by classic contributions in economics and related disciplines.

Welfare Economics and Social Choice Theory

Author: A.M. Feldman
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 1461581419
Format: PDF, ePub
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This book covers the main topics of welfare economics - general equilib rium models of exchange and production, Pareto optimality, externalities and public goods - and some of the major topic of social choice the ory - compensation criteria, fairness, voting, Arrow's Theorem, and stra tegic behavior. The underlying question is this: "Is a particular economic or voting mechanism good or bad for society?" Welfare economics is mainly about whether the market mechanism is good or bad; social choice is largely about whether voting mechanisms can improve upon the results of the market. The book grew out of my undergraduate welfare economics course at Brown University, and it is intended for the undergraduate student who has some prior familiarity with microeconomics. However the book is also use ful for graduate students and professionals, economists and non-econo mists, who want an overview of welfare and social choice results unbur dened by detail and mathematical complexity.

Government Failure

Author: Gordon Tullock
Publisher: Cato Institute
ISBN: 1935308009
Format: PDF, Kindle
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When market forces fail us, what are we to do? Who will step in to protect the public interest? The government, right? Wrong. The romantic view of bureaucrats coming to the rescue confuses the true relationship between economics and politics. Politicians often cite "market failure" as justification for meddling with the economy, but a group of leading scholars show the shortcomings of this view. In Government Failure, these scholars explain the school of study known as "public choice," which uses the tools of economics to understand and evaluate government activity. Gordon Tullock, one of the founders of public choice, explains how government "cures" often cause more harm than good. Tullock provides an engaging overview of public choice and discusses how interest groups seek favors from government at enormous costs to society. Displaying the steely realism that has marked public choice, Tullock shows the political world as it is, rather than as it should be. Gordon Brady scrutinizes American public policy, looking closely at international trade, efforts at regulating technology, and environmental policy. At every turn Brady points out the ways in which interest groups have manipulated the government to advance their own agendas. Arthur Seldon, a seminal scholar in public choice, provides a comparative perspective from Great Britain. He examines how government interventions in the British economy have led to inefficiency and warns about the political centralization promised by the European Community. Government Failure heralds a new approach to the study of politics and public policy. This book enlightens readers with the basic concepts of public choice in an unusually accessible way to show the folly of excessive faith in the state.

A Primer on Nonmarket Valuation

Author: Patricia A. Champ
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 9400771045
Format: PDF
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This is a practical book with clear descriptions of the most commonly used nonmarket methods. The first chapters of the book provide the context and theoretical foundation of nonmarket valuation along with a discussion of data collection procedures. The middle chapters describe the major stated- and revealed-preference valuation methods. For each method, the steps involved in implementation are laid out and carefully explained with supporting references from the published literature. The final chapters of the book examine the relevance of experimentation to economic valuation, the transfer of existing nonmarket values to new settings, and assessments of the reliability and validity of nonmarket values. The book is relevant to individuals in many professions at all career levels. Professionals in government agencies, attorneys involved with natural resource damage assessments, graduate students, and others will appreciate the thorough descriptions of how to design, implement, and analyze a nonmarket valuation study.

Group Agency

Author: Christian List
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199591563
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Are companies, churches, and states genuine agents? How do we explain their behaviour? Can we treat them as accountable for their actions? List and Pettit offer original arguments, grounded in cutting-edge work on social choice, economics, and philosophy, to show there really are group agents, over and above the individual agents who compose them.

Encyclopedia of Public Administration and Public Policy K Z

Author: Jack Rabin
Publisher: CRC Press
ISBN: 9780824742997
Format: PDF
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From the Nuremberg trials to the Civil Service Reform Act of 1978 to recent budget reconciliation bills, the Encyclopedia of Public Administration and Public Policy provides detailed coverage of watershed policies and decisions from such fields as privatization, biomedical ethics, education, and diversity. This second edition features a wide range of new topics, including military administration, government procurement, social theory, and justice administration in developed democracies. It also addresses current issues such as the creation of the Department of Homeland Security and covers public administration in the Middle East, Africa, Southeast Asia, the Pacific, and Latin America.

Strategy and dynamics in contests

Author: Kai Andreas Konrad
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN:
Format: PDF, Mobi
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This book describes the theory structure underlying contests, in which players expend effort and/or spend money in trying to get ahead of one another. Uniquely, this effort is sunk and cannot be recovered, regardless of whether a player wins or loses in the competition. Such interactions include diverse phenomena such as marketing and advertising by firms, litigation, relative reward schemes in firms, political competition, patent races, sports, military combat, war and civil war. These have been studied in the field of contest theory both within these specific contexts and at a higher level of abstraction. The purpose of this book is to describe the fundamental common properties of these types of interactions and to uncover some common properties or laws that govern them. The book begins by describing the properties of static contests and tournaments. Aspects such as timing, entry, sabotage and delegation are added and contest design issues such as the admission or exclusion of players and the structure of prizes are discussed. Further, structures are analysed in which players interact repeatedly in the same or different contest environments. Examples are inter-group conflict followed by intra-group rivalry, elimination tournaments and other dynamic contest structures.

Gaming the Vote

Author: William Poundstone
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 9780809048922
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Offers a critical assessment of fundamental flaws in the American electoral system, looking at how a minor "spoiler" candidate can affect the election by taking enough votes away from the most popular candidate to tip the election to another, and proposes a simple but fair solution designed to transform the electoral system.