A Tragedy of Democracy

Author: Greg Robinson
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231520123
Format: PDF, Docs
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The confinement of some 120,000 Japanese Americans during World War II, often called the Japanese American internment, has been described as the worst official civil rights violation of modern U. S. history. Greg Robinson not only offers a bold new understanding of these events but also studies them within a larger time frame and from a transnational perspective. Drawing on newly discovered material, Robinson provides a backstory of confinement that reveals for the first time the extent of the American government's surveillance of Japanese communities in the years leading up to war and the construction of what officials termed "concentration camps" for enemy aliens. He also considers the aftermath of confinement, including the place of Japanese Americans in postwar civil rights struggles, the long movement by former camp inmates for redress, and the continuing role of the camps as touchstones for nationwide commemoration and debate. Most remarkably, A Tragedy of Democracy is the first book to analyze official policy toward West Coast Japanese Americans within a North American context. Robinson studies confinement on the mainland alongside events in wartime Hawaii, where fears of Japanese Americans justified Army dictatorship, suspension of the Constitution, and the imposition of military tribunals. He similarly reads the treatment of Japanese Americans against Canada's confinement of 22,000 citizens and residents of Japanese ancestry from British Columbia. A Tragedy of Democracy recounts the expulsion of almost 5,000 Japanese from Mexico's Pacific Coast and the poignant story of the Japanese Latin Americans who were kidnapped from their homes and interned in the United States. Approaching Japanese confinement as a continental and international phenomenon, Robinson offers a truly kaleidoscopic understanding of its genesis and outcomes. The confinement of some 120,000 Japanese Americans during World War II, often called the Japanese American internment, has been described as the worst official civil rights violation of modern U. S. history. Greg Robinson not only offers a bold new understanding of these events but also studies them within a larger time frame and from a transnational perspective. Drawing on newly discovered material, Robinson provides a backstory of confinement that reveals for the first time the extent of the American government's surveillance of Japanese communities in the years leading up to war and the construction of what officials termed "concentration camps" for enemy aliens. He also considers the aftermath of confinement, including the place of Japanese Americans in postwar civil rights struggles, the long movement by former camp inmates for redress, and the continuing role of the camps as touchstones for nationwide commemoration and debate. Most remarkably, A Tragedy of Democracy is the first book to analyze official policy toward West Coast Japanese Americans within a North American context. Robinson studies confinement on the mainland alongside events in wartime Hawaii, where fears of Japanese Americans justified Army dictatorship, suspension of the Constitution, and the imposition of military tribunals. He similarly reads the treatment of Japanese Americans against Canada's confinement of 22,000 citizens and residents of Japanese ancestry from British Columbia. A Tragedy of Democracy recounts the expulsion of almost 5,000 Japanese from Mexico's Pacific Coast and the poignant story of the Japanese Latin Americans who were kidnapped from their homes and interned in the United States. Approaching Japanese confinement as a continental and international phenomenon, Robinson offers a truly kaleidoscopic understanding of its genesis and outcomes.

A Tragedy of Democracy

Author: Greg Robinson
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231129238
Format: PDF, ePub
Download Now
The confinement of some 120,000 Japanese Americans during World War II, often called the Japanese American internment, has been described as the worst official civil rights violation of modern U. S. history. Drawing on newly discovered material, Greg Robinson reveals for the first time the extent of the American government's surveillance of Japanese communities in the years leading up to war and the construction of what officials termed "concentration camps" for enemy aliens. He also considers the aftermath of confinement, including the place of Japanese Americans in postwar civil rights and redress struggles. Most remarkably, A Tragedy of Democracy is the first book to analyze official policy toward West Coast Japanese Americans within a North American context. Robinson studies confinement on the mainland alongside martial law and the imposition of military tribunals in wartime Hawaii, as well as Canada's confinement of 22,000 ethnic Japanese from British Columbia. Approaching Japanese confinement as a transnational phenomenon, A Tragedy of Democracy offers a kaleidoscopic understanding of its genesis and outcomes.

A Tragedy of Democracy

Author: Greg Robinson
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780231129220
Format: PDF, Docs
Download Now
The confinement of some 120,000 Japanese Americans during World War II, often called the Japanese American internment, has been described as the worst official civil rights violation of modern U. S. history. Greg Robinson not only offers a bold new understanding of these events but also studies them within a larger time frame and from a transnational perspective. Drawing on newly discovered material, Robinson provides a backstory of confinement that reveals for the first time the extent of the American government's surveillance of Japanese communities in the years leading up to war and the construction of what officials termed "concentration camps" for enemy aliens. He also considers the aftermath of confinement, including the place of Japanese Americans in postwar civil rights struggles, the long movement by former camp inmates for redress, and the continuing role of the camps as touchstones for nationwide commemoration and debate. Most remarkably, A Tragedy of Democracy is the first book to analyze official policy toward West Coast Japanese Americans within a North American context. Robinson studies confinement on the mainland alongside events in wartime Hawaii, where fears of Japanese Americans justified Army dictatorship, suspension of the Constitution, and the imposition of military tribunals. He similarly reads the treatment of Japanese Americans against Canada's confinement of 22,000 citizens and residents of Japanese ancestry from British Columbia. A Tragedy of Democracy recounts the expulsion of almost 5,000 Japanese from Mexico's Pacific Coast and the poignant story of the Japanese Latin Americans who were kidnapped from their homes and interned in the United States. Approaching Japanese confinement as a continental and international phenomenon, Robinson offers a truly kaleidoscopic understanding of its genesis and outcomes.

After Camp

Author: Greg Robinson
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520271580
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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"The tragedy of incarceration has dominated historical studies of Japanese Americans, and few have explored what happened in the years that followed. A welcome addition to the literature, Greg Robinson's insightful study, "After Camp," will appeal to historians of immigration, the Asian American experience, comparative race relations, and the twentieth-century United States more broadly." --David K. Yoo, author of "Growing Up Nisei" "Greg Robinson has boldly and rightfully identified historians' neglect of Japanese American experiences after World War II. Rather than focusing exclusively on the Pacific Coast, "After Camp" offers a nuanced exploration of the competing strategies and ideas about postwar assimilation among ethnic Japanese on a truly national scale. The depth and range of Robinson's research is impressive, and "After Camp" convincingly moves beyond the tragedy of internment to explain how the drama of resettlement was equally if not more important in shaping the lives of contemporary Japanese Americans."--Allison Varzally, author of "Making a Non-White America."

Encyclopedia of Japanese American Internment

Author: Gary Y. Okihiro
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 0313399166
Format: PDF
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This book addresses the forced removal and confinement of Japanese Americans during World War II—a topic significant to all Americans, regardless of race or color.

Pacific Citizens

Author: Greg Robinson
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 9780252093838
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Offering a window into a critical era in Japanese American life, Pacific Citizens collects key writings of Larry S. Tajiri, a multitalented journalist, essayist, and popular culture maven. He and his wife, Guyo, who worked by his side, became leading figures in Nisei political life as the central purveyors of news for and about Japanese Americans during World War II, both those confined in government camps and others outside. The Tajiris made the community newspaper the Pacific Citizen a forum for liberal and progressive views on politics, civil rights, and democracy, insightfully addressing issues of assimilation, multiracialism, and U.S. foreign relations. Through his editorship of the Pacific Citizen as well as in articles and columns in outside media, Larry Tajiri became the Japanese American community's most visible spokesperson, articulating a broad vision of Nisei identity to a varied audience. In this thoughtfully framed and annotated volume, Greg Robinson interprets and examines the contributions of the Tajiris through a selection of writings, columns, editorials, and correspondence from before, during, and after the war. Pacific Citizens contextualizes the Tajiris' output, providing a telling portrait of these two dedicated journalists and serving as a reminder of the public value of the ethnic community press.

By Order of the President

Author: Greg ROBINSON
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674042808
Format: PDF, ePub
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On February 19, 1942, following the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt signed a fateful order that allowed for the summary removal of Japanese aliens and American citizens of Japanese descent from their West Coast homes and their incarceration under guard in camps. Amid the numerous histories and memoirs devoted to this shameful event, FDR's contributions have been seen as negligible. Now, using Roosevelt's own writings, his advisors' letters and diaries, and internal government documents, Greg Robinson reveals the president's central role in making and implementing the internment and examines not only what the president did but why.

Between Two Empires

Author: Eiichiro Azuma
Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand
ISBN: 0195159403
Format: PDF
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'Between Two Empires' probes the complexities of prewar Japanese American community to show how Japanese in America occupied an in-between space between American nationality & Japanese racial identity.

I am an American

Author: Jerry Stanley
Publisher: Scholastic
ISBN: 9780590684446
Format: PDF
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Describes the experiences of one Japanese American citizen in the Japanese internment camps authorized by President Roosevelt on February 19, 1942 during World War II.

Inside America s Concentration Camps

Author: James L. Dickerson
Publisher: Chicago Review Press
ISBN: 1569767483
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Exploring the history and tragedy of concentration camps that were built, staged, and filled with adults and children under the orders of the U.S. government, this vivid narrative brings the stories of victims and flaws of American government to life. Beginning in the 1830s with the imprisonment of Native Americans, this investigation details the camps that reappeared during World War II with the round-up of Japanese Americans, German Americans, Italian Americans, and Jews fleeing Nazi Germany, as well as more recently during the Bush administration with the construction of new concentration camps in Cuba. The moving personal experiences of those imprisoned in the camps, including accounts of how the U.S. government removed children of Japanese ancestry from orphanages only to replace them in camps, are revealed within this eye-opening history. Both heartbreaking and inspirational, this authoritative record of survival suggests a call to action for those who read it.