A Working People

Author: Steven A. Reich
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
ISBN: 9781442203327
Format: PDF, ePub
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In this book, historian Steven A. Reich examines the economic, political and cultural forces that have beaten and built America’s black workforce since Emancipation. From the abolition of slavery through the Civil Rights Movement and Great Recession, African Americans have faced a unique set of obstacles and prejudices on their way to becoming a productive and indispensable portion of the American workforce. Repeatedly denied access to the opportunities all Americans are to be afforded under the Constitution, African Americans have combined decades of collective action and community mobilization with the trailblazing heroism of a select few to pave their own way to prosperity. This latest installment of the African American History Series challenges the notion that racial prejudices are buried in our nation’s history, and instead provides a narrative connecting the struggles of many generations of African American workers to those felt the present day. Reich provides an unblinking account of what being an African American worker has meant since the 1860s, alluding to ways in which we can and must learn from our past, for the betterment of all workers, however marginalized they may be. A Working People: A History of African American Workers Since Emancipation is as factually astute as it is accessibly written, a tapestry of over 150 years of troubled yet triumphant African-American labor history that we still weave today.

History of African Americans Exploring Diverse Roots

Author: Thomas J. Davis Ph.D.
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 0313385416
Format: PDF, ePub
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This rich cultural history of African Americans outlines their travails, triumphs, and achievements in negotiating individual and collective identities to overcome racism, slavery, and the legacies of these injustices from colonial times to the present. • Reveals the extent of anti-black racism in America • Examines black heritage in America from its colonial origins to the present • Highlights the contributions of African Americans throughout history • Illustrates the role of blacks in the American economy • Centers on African Americans in the development of American history

The Black worker

Author: Eric Arnesen
Publisher: Univ of Illinois Pr
ISBN: 9780252031458
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Long before the modern civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s made a frontal assault on the reigning segregationist order, African American workers had to struggle against both their employers and fellow white workers. Because their efforts to secure their workplace rights pitted them against the broader structures of racial oppression, their activism constituted nothing less than a form of civil rights struggle. Uniting the latest scholarship on race, labour, and civil rights, The Black Worker aims to establish the richness of the African American working-class experience, and the indisputable role of black workers in shaping the politics and history of labour and race in the United States.To capture the complexity of African Americans' experiences in the workplace, this reader examines workers engaged in a wide array of jobs, including sharecropping, coal mining, domestic service, longshoring, automobile manufacturing, tobacco processing, railroading, prostitution, lumbering, and municipal employment. The essays' subjects include black migration, strikebreaking, black conservatism, gender, and the multiple forms of employment discrimination in the South and North. Other contributions deal explicitly with state policy and black workers during the transition from slavery to freedom, World Wars I and II, and the 1960s.The variety of challenges made by these workers, both quiet and overt, served as clear reminders to the supporters of white supremacy that, despite their best efforts through violence, fraud, and the law, as long as they insisted upon racial inequality, the "race question" would never be fully resolved.

The Great Black Migration A Historical Encyclopedia of the American Mosaic

Author: Steven A. Reich
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 1610696662
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Treating broad themes as well as specific topics, this guide to the Great Black Migration will introduce high school students to a touchstone critical to shaping the history of African Americans in the United States. • Provides students with essential information about key people, places, organizations, and events that defined the movement of Southern African Americans to the urban North and West • Covers the first major migration between the advent of World War I and the Great Depression and the second, smaller wave from 1940 to 1970 • Devotes considerable space to the social, cultural, and political world of black migrant communities of the urban North and West • Includes primary sources to promote critical thinking and interpretive reading underscored in the Common Core Standards • Features contributions from a wide range of disciplines, including art and music history, demography, economics, journalism, history, literary criticism, political science, and sociology

Wobblies on the Waterfront

Author: Peter Cole
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 0252090853
Format: PDF, ePub
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During the 1910s and 1920s, the Philadelphia waterfront was home to the most durable interracial, multiethnic union seen in the United States prior to the Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO) era. For much of its time, Local 8's majority was African American and included immigrants from Eastern Europe as well as many Irish Americans. In this important study, Peter Cole examines how Local 8, affiliated with the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW), accomplished what no other did at the time. He also shows how race was central not only to the rise but also to the decline of Local 8, as increasing racial tensions were manipulated by employers and federal agents bent on the union's destruction.

A People s History of the United States

Author: Howard Zinn
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317325303
Format: PDF, Kindle
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This is a new edition of the radical social history of America from Columbus to the present. This powerful and controversial study turns orthodox American history upside down to portray the social turmoil behind the "march of progress". Known for its lively, clear prose as well as its scholarly research, A People's History is the only volume to tell America's story from the point of view of - and in the words of - America's women, factory workers, African-Americans, Native Americans, the working poor, and immigrant laborers. As historian Howard Zinn shows, many of America's greatest battles - the fights for fair wage, an eight-hour workday, child-labor laws, health and safety standards, universal suffrage, women's rights, racial equality - were carried out at the grassroots level, against bloody resistance. Covering Christopher Columbus's arrival through the Clinton years A People's History of the United States, which was nominated for the American Book Award in 1981, is an insightful analysis of the most important events in US history.

African American History from Emancipation to Today

Author: Ann Byers
Publisher: Enslow Pub Incorporated
ISBN: 9780766021532
Format: PDF, ePub
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Provides an overview of the significant people, places, and events associated with the end of slavery and the continuing struggle for equal rights in America.

Self Taught

Author: Heather Andrea Williams
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 9780807888971
Format: PDF
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In this previously untold story of African American self-education, Heather Andrea Williams moves across time to examine African Americans' relationship to literacy during slavery, during the Civil War, and in the first decades of freedom. Self-Taught traces the historical antecedents to freedpeople's intense desire to become literate and demonstrates how the visions of enslaved African Americans emerged into plans and action once slavery ended. Enslaved people, Williams contends, placed great value in the practical power of literacy, whether it was to enable them to read the Bible for themselves or to keep informed of the abolition movement and later the progress of the Civil War. Some slaves devised creative and subversive means to acquire literacy, and when slavery ended, they became the first teachers of other freedpeople. Soon overwhelmed by the demands for education, they called on northern missionaries to come to their aid. Williams argues that by teaching, building schools, supporting teachers, resisting violence, and claiming education as a civil right, African Americans transformed the face of education in the South to the great benefit of both black and white southerners.