A Yupiaq Worldview

Author: Angayuqaq Oscar Kawagley
Publisher: Waveland PressInc
ISBN: 9781577663843
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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"Oscar Kawagley is a man of two worlds, walking the sometimes bewildering line between traditional Yupiaq culture and the Westernized Yupiaq life of today. In this study, Kawagley follows both memories of his Yupiaq grandmother, who raised him with the stories of the Bear Woman and respectful knowledge of the reciprocity of nature, and his own education in science as it is taught in Western schools. Kawagley is a man who hears the elders' voices in Alaska and knows how to look for the weather and to use the land and its creatures with the most delicate care. In a call to unite the two parts of his own and modern Yupiaq history, Kawagley proposes a way of teaching that incorporates all ways of knowing available in Yupiaq and Western science."--BOOK JACKET.

Identity and the Natural Environment

Author: Susan D. Clayton
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 9780262532068
Format: PDF
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Theory-based, empirical studies of the ways in which our sense of identity affects and is affected by our relationship with nature, and the implications for more effective environmental policy.

Alaska Native Education

Author: Ray Barnhardt
Publisher: University of Alaska Fairbanks Center for
ISBN: 9781877962431
Format: PDF, ePub
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Over the past century, the outside world has increasingly encroached on Alaska Native communities, and one of the consequences of that change has been a shift in the purpose and structure of schools in Alaska Native communities. Alaska Native Education brings together a variety of experts in the field of indigenous education to show the ways in which Alaska Natives have adopted and adapted outside ideas and rules regarding education—and how they have frequently found them problematic and insufficient. The authors follow their analysis with suggestions of ways forward, emphasizing the benefits of blending new and old practices that will simultaneously prepare Alaska Native students for the future while preserving and strengthening their ties to the past.

A Natural History of Place in Education

Author: David C. Hutchison
Publisher: Teachers College Press
ISBN: 9780807744697
Format: PDF, ePub
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Hutchison argues that pressures on schools associated with declining budgets, competing ideologies, and economic/technological shifts have the potential to radically alter the landscape of the K-12 school experience. He discusses strategies for This book considers the philosophy of place in education and everyday life, the history of and current trends in school design, the school infrastructure crisis, and the relationship between the philosophy of education and classroom design. Hutchison argues that pressures on schools associated with declining budgets, competing ideologies, and economic/technological shifts have the potential to radically alter the landscape of the K-12 school experience. He discusses strategies for mediating these pressures and strengthening a sense of place in education.mediating these pressures and strengthening a sense of place in education.

The Alaska Native Reader

Author: Maria Sháa Tláa Williams
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822390833
Format: PDF
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Alaska is home to more than two hundred federally recognized tribes. Yet the long histories and diverse cultures of Alaska’s first peoples are often ignored, while the stories of Russian fur hunters and American gold miners, of salmon canneries and oil pipelines, are praised. Filled with essays, poems, songs, stories, maps, and visual art, this volume foregrounds the perspectives of Alaska Native people, from a Tlingit photographer to Athabascan and Yup’ik linguists, and from an Alutiiq mask carver to a prominent Native politician and member of Alaska’s House of Representatives. The contributors, most of whom are Alaska Natives, include scholars, political leaders, activists, and artists. The majority of the pieces in The Alaska Native Reader were written especially for the volume, while several were translated from Native languages. The Alaska Native Reader describes indigenous worldviews, languages, arts, and other cultural traditions as well as contemporary efforts to preserve them. Several pieces examine Alaska Natives’ experiences of and resistance to Russian and American colonialism; some of these address land claims, self-determination, and sovereignty. Some essays discuss contemporary Alaska Native literature, indigenous philosophical and spiritual tenets, and the ways that Native peoples are represented in the media. Others take up such diverse topics as the use of digital technologies to document Native cultures, planning systems that have enabled indigenous communities to survive in the Arctic for thousands of years, and a project to accurately represent Dena’ina heritage in and around Anchorage. Fourteen of the volume’s many illustrations appear in color, including work by the contemporary artists Subhankar Banerjee, Perry Eaton, Erica Lord, and Larry McNeil.

Spiritual Ecology

Author: Leslie Elmer Sponsel
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 0313364095
Format: PDF, ePub
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A prominent scientist and scholar documents and explains the thoughts, actions, and legacies of spiritual ecology's pioneers from ancient times to the present, demonstrating how the movement may offer the last chance to restore a healthy relationship between humankind and nature. * Clear, concise, and captivating essays on well-known, as well as little-known, pioneers in spiritual ecology * Chapter-long treatment of each individual's contributions, allowing for in-depth coverage * An extensive resource guide, including films and websites * An appendix listing approximately 100 pioneers in spiritual ecology

Ecological Education in Action

Author: Gregory A. Smith
Publisher: SUNY Press
ISBN: 9780791439852
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Celebrates the work of educators who explore ecological issues in school and non-school settings. Gives examples of ways to impact the thinking of children and adults in order to affirm the values of sufficiency, mutual support, and community.

The Alaska Native Reader

Author: Maria Sháa Tláa Williams
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822390833
Format: PDF, Kindle
Download Now
Alaska is home to more than two hundred federally recognized tribes. Yet the long histories and diverse cultures of Alaska’s first peoples are often ignored, while the stories of Russian fur hunters and American gold miners, of salmon canneries and oil pipelines, are praised. Filled with essays, poems, songs, stories, maps, and visual art, this volume foregrounds the perspectives of Alaska Native people, from a Tlingit photographer to Athabascan and Yup’ik linguists, and from an Alutiiq mask carver to a prominent Native politician and member of Alaska’s House of Representatives. The contributors, most of whom are Alaska Natives, include scholars, political leaders, activists, and artists. The majority of the pieces in The Alaska Native Reader were written especially for the volume, while several were translated from Native languages. The Alaska Native Reader describes indigenous worldviews, languages, arts, and other cultural traditions as well as contemporary efforts to preserve them. Several pieces examine Alaska Natives’ experiences of and resistance to Russian and American colonialism; some of these address land claims, self-determination, and sovereignty. Some essays discuss contemporary Alaska Native literature, indigenous philosophical and spiritual tenets, and the ways that Native peoples are represented in the media. Others take up such diverse topics as the use of digital technologies to document Native cultures, planning systems that have enabled indigenous communities to survive in the Arctic for thousands of years, and a project to accurately represent Dena’ina heritage in and around Anchorage. Fourteen of the volume’s many illustrations appear in color, including work by the contemporary artists Subhankar Banerjee, Perry Eaton, Erica Lord, and Larry McNeil.

American Indian Education

Author: Matthew L. M. Fletcher
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135908265
Format: PDF
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America Indian culture and traditions have survived an unusual amount of oppressive federal and state educational policies intended to assimilate Indian people and destroy their cultures and languages. Yet, Indian culture, traditions, and people often continue to be treated as objects in the classroom and in the curriculum. Using a critical race theory framework and a unique "counternarrative" methodology, American Indian Education explores a host of modern educational issues facing American Indian peoples—from the impact of Indian sports mascots on students and communities, to the uses and abuses of law that often never reach a courtroom, and the intergenerational impacts of American Indian education policy on Indian children today. By interweaving empirical research with accessible composite narratives, Matthew Fletcher breaches the gap between solid educational policy and the on-the-ground reality of Indian students, highlighting the challenges faced by American Indian students and paving the way for an honest discussion about solutions.

Native Science

Author: Gregory Cajete
Publisher: Clear Light Pub
ISBN:
Format: PDF, ePub
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Cajete examines the multiple levels of meaning that inform Native astronomy, cosmology, psychology, agriculture, and the healing arts. Unlike the western scientific method, native thinking does not isolate an object or phenomenon in order to understand it, but perceives it in terms of relationship. An understanding of the relationships that bind together natural forces and all forms of life has been fundamental to the ability of indigenous peoples to live for millennia in spiritual and physical harmony with the land. It is clear that the first peoples offer perspectives that can help us work toward solutions at this time of global environmental crisis.