Advances in the Sign Language Development of Deaf Children

Author: Brenda Schick
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780198039969
Format: PDF, Kindle
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The use of sign language has a long history. Indeed, humans' first languages may have been expressed through sign. Sign languages have been found around the world, even in communities without access to formal education. In addition to serving as a primary means of communication for Deaf communities, sign languages have become one of hearing students' most popular choices for second-language study. Sign languages are now accepted as complex and complete languages that are the linguistic equals of spoken languages. Sign-language research is a relatively young field, having begun fewer than 50 years ago. Since then, interest in the field has blossomed and research has become much more rigorous as demand for empirically verifiable results have increased. In the same way that cross-linguistic research has led to a better understanding of how language affects development, cross-modal research has led to a better understanding of how language is acquired. It has also provided valuable evidence on the cognitive and social development of both deaf and hearing children, excellent theoretical insights into how the human brain acquires and structures sign and spoken languages, and important information on how to promote the development of deaf children. This volume brings together the leading scholars on the acquisition and development of sign languages to present the latest theory and research on these topics. They address theoretical as well as applied questions and provide cogent summaries of what is known about early gestural development, interactive processes adapted to visual communication, linguisic structures, modality effects, and semantic, syntactic, and pragmatic development in sign. Along with its companion volume, Advances in the Spoken Language Development of Deaf and Hard-of Hearing Children, this book will provide a deep and broad picture about what is known about deaf children's language development in a variety of situations and contexts. From this base of information, progress in research and its application will accelerate, and barriers to deaf children's full participation in the world around them will continue to be overcome.

The Oxford Handbook of Deaf Studies Language and Education

Author: Marc Marschark
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0195390032
Format: PDF, Kindle
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"In this follow-up volume, Marschark and Spencer have amassed a collection that is impressive in breadth and depth. The research presented here documents the sea-change observable in classrooms and schools for deaf children and is reflected in the variety of chapters...A masterful companion to the original volume." C. Tane Akamatsu, Psychologist, Toronto District School Board --Book Jacket.

Resilience in Deaf Children

Author: Debra H. Zand
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9781441977960
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Historically, the diagnosis of deafness in a child has been closely associated with profound disability, including such typical outcomes as unmet potential and a life of isolation. A major shift away from this negative view has led to improved prospects for deaf children. Resilience in Deaf Children emphasizes not only the capability of deaf individuals to withstand adversity, but also their positive adaptation through interactions with parents, peers, school, and community. In this engaging volume, leading researchers and professionals pay particular attention to such issues as attachment, self-concept, and social competence, which are crucial to the development of all young people. In addition, the volume offers strategies for family members, professionals, and others for promoting the well-being of deaf children and youth. Coverage includes: Attachment formation among deaf infants and their primary caregivers. Deaf parents as sources of positive development and resilience for deaf infants. Enhancing resilience to mental health disorders in deaf school children. Strength-based guidelines for improving the developmental environments of deaf children and youth. Community cultural wealth and deaf adolescents’ resilience. Self-efficacy in the management of anticipated work-family conflict as a resilience factor among young deaf adults. Resilience in Deaf Children is essential reading for researchers, clinicians, and graduate students in clinical child, school, and developmental psychology as well as for allied researchers and professionals in such disciplines as school counseling, occupational therapy, and social work.

Language and Deafness

Author: Peter V. Paul
Publisher: Jones & Bartlett Learning
ISBN: 9780763751043
Format: PDF
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The Fourth Edition of Language and Deafness covers language and literacy development from preschool through adolescence. Content includes the basics of language development and the relationship between language and cognition. Oral communication methods and English-like signing systems are also covered, along with linguistics/sociolinguistics of American Sign Language. Multicultural aspects, including bilingualism and second-language learning, are covered in detail.

How Deaf Children Learn

Author: Marc Marschark
Publisher: OUP USA
ISBN: 0195389751
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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In this book, renowned authorities Marschark and Hauser explain how empirical research conducted over the last several years directly informs educational practices at home and in the classroom, and offer strategies that parents and teachers can use to promote optimal learning in their deaf and hard-of-hearing children.

Nurturing Language and Learning

Author: Patricia Elizabeth Spencer
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199931321
Format: PDF, Docs
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Regardless of a child's hearing abilities, increasing parents' knowledge about their baby or toddler's expected development and their confidence in their parenting abilities supports positive early interactions and developmental progress. Fortunately, as early hearing screening has becomewidespread, more information is available about development of deaf and hard-of-hearing infants and ways to best support their developing learning and language abilities. This book combines a review of up-to-date research with theory and first-hand observations to provide a framework for parents and professionals as they promote developmental achievements of infants and toddlers with limited hearing. In what ways is development of deaf and hard-of-hearing babies andtoddlers like that of those with typical hearing? What specific challenges are likely to be faced by child and parent - and when are they most likely to occur? What modifications in parenting and caregiver interactive behaviors can help avoid or overcome these challenges? A strong, supportive foundation for optimal learning throughout life grows from early, positive, and responsive interactive experiences. This book provides information and guidelines for professionals and parents helping deaf and hard-of-hearing infants and toddlers build that foundation.

A Lens on Deaf Identities

Author: Irene Leigh
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0195320662
Format: PDF, Docs
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This title explores identity formation in deaf persons. It looks at the major influences on deaf identity, including the relatively recent formal recognition of a deaf culture, the different internalized models of disability and deafness, and the appearance of deaf identity theories in the psychological literature.

Research Methods in Sign Language Studies

Author: Eleni Orfanidou
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1118345967
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Research Methods in Sign Language Studies is a landmark work on sign language research, which spans the fields of linguistics, experimental and developmental psychology, brain research, and language assessment. Examines a broad range of topics, including ethical and political issues, key methodologies, and the collection of linguistic, cognitive, neuroscientific, and neuropsychological data Provides tips and recommendations to improve research quality at all levels and encourages readers to approach the field from the perspective of diversity rather than disability Incorporates research on sign languages from Europe, Asia, North and South America, and Africa Brings together top researchers on the subject from around the world, including many who are themselves deaf

Deaf Cognition

Author: Marc Marschark
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199709397
Format: PDF
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Deaf Cognition examines the cognitive underpinnings of deaf individuals' learning. Marschark and Hauser have brought together scientists from different disciplines, which rarely interact, to share their ideas and create this book. It contributes to the science of learning by describing and testing theories that might either over or underestimate the role that audition or vision plays in learning and memory, and by shedding light on multiple pathways for learning. International experts in cognitive psychology, brain sciences, cognitive development, and deaf children offer a unique, integrative examination of cognition and learning, with discussions on their implications for deaf education. Each chapter focuses primarily on the intersection of research in cognitive psychology, developmental psychology, and deaf education. The general theme of the book is that deaf and hearing individuals differ to some extent in early experience, brain development, cognitive functioning, memory organization, and problem solving. Identifying similarities and differences among these domains provides new insights into potential methods for enhancing achievement in this traditionally under-performing population.