Afghanistan

Author: Thomas Barfield
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9781400834532
Format: PDF, ePub
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Afghanistan traces the historic struggles and the changing nature of political authority in this volatile region of the world, from the Mughal Empire in the sixteenth century to the Taliban resurgence today. Thomas Barfield introduces readers to the bewildering diversity of tribal and ethnic groups in Afghanistan, explaining what unites them as Afghans despite the regional, cultural, and political differences that divide them. He shows how governing these peoples was relatively easy when power was concentrated in a small dynastic elite, but how this delicate political order broke down in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries when Afghanistan's rulers mobilized rural militias to expel first the British and later the Soviets. Armed insurgency proved remarkably successful against the foreign occupiers, but it also undermined the Afghan government's authority and rendered the country ever more difficult to govern as time passed. Barfield vividly describes how Afghanistan's armed factions plunged the country into a civil war, giving rise to clerical rule by the Taliban and Afghanistan's isolation from the world. He examines why the American invasion in the wake of September 11 toppled the Taliban so quickly, and how this easy victory lulled the United States into falsely believing that a viable state could be built just as easily. Afghanistan is essential reading for anyone who wants to understand how a land conquered and ruled by foreign dynasties for more than a thousand years became the "graveyard of empires" for the British and Soviets, and what the United States must do to avoid a similar fate.

The War for Afghanistan A Very Brief History

Author: Thomas Barfield
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400843146
Format: PDF, ePub
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When it invaded Afghanistan in 2001, the United States sought to do something previous foreign powers had never attempted: to create an Afghani state where none existed. More than a decade on, the new regime in Kabul remains plagued by illegitimacy and ineffectiveness. What happened? As Thomas Barfield shows, the history of previous efforts to build governments in Afghanistan does much to explain the difficulties besetting this newest experiment. Princeton Shorts are brief selections taken from influential Princeton University Press books and produced exclusively in ebook format. Providing unmatched insight into important contemporary issues or timeless passages from classic works of the past, Princeton Shorts enable you to be an instant expert in a world where information is everywhere but quality is at a premium.

Contested Terrain

Author: Sally L Kitch
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 0252096649
Format: PDF, ePub
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Sally L. Kitch explores the crisis in contemporary Afghan women’s lives by focusing on two remarkable Afghan professional women working on behalf of their Afghan sisters. Kitch's compelling narrative follows the stories of Judge Marzia Basel and Jamila Afghani from 2005 through 2013, providing an oft-ignored perspective on the personal and professional lives of Afghanistan's women. Contending with the complex dynamics of a society both undergoing and resisting change, Basel and Afghani speak candidly--and critically--of matters like international intervention and patriarchal Afghan culture, capturing the ways in which immense possibility alternates and vies with utter hopelessness. Strongly rooted in feminist theory and interdisciplinary historical and geopolitical analysis, Contested Terrain sheds new light on the struggle against the powerful forces that affect Afghan women's education, health, political participation, livelihoods, and quality of life. The book also suggests how a new dialogue might be started--in which women from across geopolitical boundaries might find common cause for change and rewrite their collective stories.

Culture Conflict and Counterinsurgency

Author: Thomas H. Johnson
Publisher: Stanford University Press
ISBN: 0804789215
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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The authors of Culture, Conflict and Counterinsurgency contend that an enduring victory can still be achieved in Afghanistan. However, to secure it we must better understand the cultural foundations of the continuing conflicts that rage across Afghanistan and neighboring Pakistan, and shift our strategy from an attritional engagement to a smarter war plan that embraces these cultural dimensions. They examine the nexus of culture, conflict, and strategic intervention, and attempt to establish if culture is important in a national security and foreign policy context, and to explore how cultural phenomena and information can best be used by the military. In the process they address just how intimate cultural knowledge needs to be to counter an insurgency effectively. Finally, they establish exactly how good we've been at building and utilizing cultural understanding in Afghanistan, what the operational impact of that understanding has been, and where we must improve to maximize our use of cultural knowledge in preparing for and engaging in future conflicts.

Taliban

Author: Ahmed Rashid
Publisher:
ISBN: 9783426776520
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Art Through The Ages in Afghanistan

Author: Hamid Naweed
Publisher: Author House
ISBN: 1481742752
Format: PDF
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Art through the Ages in Afghanistan, written in two volumes is a major work. It is the product of many years of research, including frequents visits to Kabul Museum and important archeological sites in Afghanistan, as well as visits to major museums in Europe and America housing important artifacts from Afghanistan. In completing his work Hamid Naweed has also made use of numerous interviews with Afghan and international scholars, local artist and local people living in the vicinity of historical sites. The second volume covering the art of Afghanistan from the advent of Islam through present time is expected to be published shortly after the publication of the first volume.

Nujeen Flucht in die Freiheit Im Rollstuhl von Aleppo nach Deutschland

Author: Christina Lamb
Publisher: HarperCollins
ISBN: 3959676344
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Was bedeutet es wirklich, ein Flüchtling zu sein, durch den Krieg frühzeitig erwachsen werden zu müssen, die geliebte Heimat hinter sich zu lassen und vom Wohlwollen anderer abhängig zu sein? Die junge Syrerin Nujeen erzählt, wie der syrische Krieg eine stolze Nation zerstört, Familien auseinander reißt und Menschen zur Flucht zwingt. In Nujeens Fall zu einer Reise durch neun Länder, in einem Rollstuhl. Doch es ist auch die Geschichte einer willensstarken jungen Frau, die in Aleppo durch eine Krankheit ans Haus gefesselt ist und sich mit amerikanischen Seifenopern Englisch beibringt, weil sie die große Hoffnung auf ein besseres Leben hat. Eine Hoffnung, die sich fern der Heimat in Deutschland erfüllen kann. »Ein unglaubliche tapferes Mädchen. Nujeen, ich bin stolz auf dich!« Bear Grylls »Außergewöhnlich! Die Angst, die Erschöpfung und die Niedergeschlagenheit sind auf jeder Seite greifbar.« The Times

Amalthea

Author: Neal Stephenson
Publisher: Manhattan
ISBN: 3641168759
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Der Mond explodierte ohne Vorwarnung und ohne erkennbaren Grund. Die Uhrzeit würde man später als A+0.0.0 oder schlicht Null bezeichnen ... 05:03:12 Weltzeit. Die Stunde Null. Nach der Explosion des Mondes wütet über Jahrtausende ein Meteoritensturm, der die Erdoberfläche in eine unbewohnbare Wüstenei verwandelt. Um die Menschheit vor der Auslöschung zu bewahren, schicken die Nationen der Erde eine Flotte von Archen ins All. Der Asteroid Amalthea – ursprünglich zu Forschungszwecken an eine internationale Raumstation angedockt –, soll der Kolonie als Schutzschild dienen. Doch das Leben im Weltraum fordert einen hohen Tribut, und der Fortbestand der menschlichen Zivilisation steht auf Messers Schneide ...