Afro Asia

Author: Fred Ho
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 9780822342816
Format: PDF, Mobi
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A collection of writing on the historical alliances, cultural connections, and shared political strategies linking African Americans and Asian Americans.

AfroAsian Encounters

Author: Heike Raphael-Hernandez
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814775802
Format: PDF, ePub
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From youth culture to adolescent sexuality to the consumer purchasing power of children en masse, studies are flourishing. Yet doing research on this unquestionably more vulnerable—whether five or fifteen—population also poses a unique set of challenges and dilemmas for researchers. How should a six-year-old be approached for an interview? What questions and topics are appropriate for twelve year olds? Do parents need to give their approval for all studies? In Representing Youth, Amy L. Best has assembled an important group of essays from some of today’s top scholars on the subject of youth that address these concerns head on, providing scholars with thoughtful and often practical answers to their many methodological concerns. These original essays range from how to conduct research on youth in ways that can be empowering for them, to issues of writing and representation, to respecting boundaries and to dealing with issues of risk and responsibility to those interviewed. For anyone doing research or working with children and young adults, Representing Youth offers an indispensable guide to many of the unique dilemmas that research with kids entails. Contributors: Amy L. Best, Sari Knopp Biklen, Elizabeth Chin, Susan Driver, Marc Flacks, Kathryn Gold Hadley, Madeline Leonard, C.J. Pascoe, Rebecca Raby, Alyssa Richman, Jessica Taft, Michael Ungar, Yvonne Vissing, and Stephani Etheridge Woodson.

Transpacific Antiracism

Author: Yuichiro Onishi
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814762646
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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“In this exhaustively-researched and beautifully-written book, Onishi uncovers a hidden history of Afro-Asian radicalism and internationalism. He presents bold and generative arguments about the ways in which the affiliation of kindred spirits across the Pacific enabled anti-racist intellectuals and activists from Japan and the U.S. to forge a new philosophy of world history and formulate practical programs for liberation.” —George Lipsitz, author of How Racism Takes Place “This fascinating and ground-breaking book offers a new window into the vital history of Afro-Asian solidarity against empire and white supremacy. Meticulously researched, it recovers the epistemological breakthroughs that emerged at the intersection of radical struggle and geographical reorientation. Through his sharp analysis of cross-cultural and transnational collectivity, Onishi provides a guidepost for all those interested in the study of utopian, boundary-crossing projects of the past, as well as the creation of future ones.” — Scott Kurashige, author of The Shifting Grounds of Race and co-author of The Next American Revolution Transpacific Antiracism introduces the dynamic process out of which social movements in Black America, Japan, and Okinawa formed Afro-Asian solidarities against the practice of white supremacy in the twentieth century. Yuichiro Onishi argues that in the context of forging Afro-Asian solidarities, race emerged as a political category of struggle with a distinct moral quality and vitality. This book explores the work of Black intellectual-activists of the first half of the twentieth century, including Hubert Harrison and W. E. B. Du Bois, that took a pro-Japan stance to articulate the connection between local and global dimensions of antiracism. Turning to two places rarely seen as a part of the Black experience, Japan and Okinawa, the book also presents the accounts of a group of Japanese scholars shaping the Black studies movement in post-surrender Japan and multiracial coalition-building in U.S.-occupied Okinawa during the height of the Vietnam War which brought together local activists, peace activists, and antiracist and antiwar GIs. Together these cases of Afro-Asian solidarity make known political discourses and projects that reworked the concept of race to become a wellspring of aspiration for a new society. Yuichiro Onishi is Assistant Professor of African American & African Studies and Asian American Studies at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities.

Everybody was Kung Fu Fighting

Author: Vijay Prashad
Publisher:
ISBN:
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Everybody Was Kung Fu Fighting examines five centuries of remarkable cultural & political interaction between black & Asians around the world. Prashad offers the theory of polyculturalism, which allows for solidarity, not just lip service to diversity.

Afro Orientalism

Author: Bill Mullen
Publisher: Choice Publishing Co., Ltd.
ISBN: 9780816637492
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Richard Wright gave voice to being an outsider. That and his opposition to post-1945 colonialism led to his own exile. Fred Ho's African and Asian themes in music and activism simultaneously reflect both cultures. Grace Lee and James Boggs turned their individual cultures and politics into a powerful partnership. Denying the exclusive nature of r

The Negro in Illinois

Author: Brian Dolinar
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 0252094956
Format: PDF, Mobi
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The Negro in Illinois was produced by a special division of the Illinois Writers' Project, one of President Roosevelt's Works Progress Administration programs. Headed by Harlem Renaissance poet Arna Bontemps and white proletarian writer Jack Conroy, The Negro in Illinois employed Richard Wright, Margaret Walker, Katherine Dunham, Fenton Johnson, Frank Yerby, Richard Durham, and other major black writers living in Chicago. The authors chronicled the African American experience in Illinois from the beginnings of slavery to the Great Migration. Individual chapters discuss various aspects of public and domestic life, recreation, politics, religion, literature, and performing arts. After the project's cancellation in 1942, most of the writings went unpublished for more than half a century--until now. Editor Brian Dolinar provides an informative introduction and epilogue which explain the origins of the project and place it in the context of the Black Chicago Renaissance.

Blacks and Asians in America

Author: Hazel M. McFerson
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781594601026
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What images come to mind when the words Asians, Asian Americans and African Americans are mentioned? Do the images revolve around negative racial stereotypes of the various groups, beginning with a portrait of African Americans, as noncitizens, and as discredited outlaws, as noted by Nobel Prize Laureate Toni Morrison in her categorization of race talk? Conversely, when images of Asians are conjured, is what comes to mind a picture of pig-tailed Chinese immigrants, along with recent Asian newcomers, eager to maintain social distance from discredited black outlaws? Do the images, which the groups often carry of one another, extend to their histories of shared diminished racial status and stereotyping, recalling a period in history when a significant segment of African American men were mocked as George, Sam and Rastus, and Chinese immigrants were ridiculed as John. How have these images shaped relations between the groups? Are there elements of commonality between Blacks and Asians in America? What historical forces have shaped their interactions? This volume, edited by Hazel M. McFerson, brings together a diverse group of scholars to address these questions. Their chapters are as diverse as their backgrounds, yet they all contribute without pessimism or naivete to a view of the varied interactions, which symbolized the crossings, commonality and conflict between Asians and African Americans during different periods, and to their prospects for future interactions.This book is divided into three parts. Part I examines relations dating from the mid-18th century to the late 1940s. Part II of the book examines contemporary issues and explores changes in Asian and Asian American communities and outlooks often characterized by race talk and social distance from African Americans. Part III of the book focuses on the international dimension of Asian/African American interactions and crossings. The book concludes with an assessment of the implications for contemporary economic interests and solidarity in Africa and Asia today.

Un American

Author: Bill V Mullen
Publisher: Temple University Press
ISBN: 143991110X
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Un-American is Bill Mullen’s revisionist account of renowned author and activist W.E.B. Du Bois’s political thought toward the end of his life, a period largely dismissed and neglected by scholars. He describes Du Bois’s support for what the Communist International called “world revolution” as the primary objective of this aged radical’s activism. Du Bois was a champion of the world’s laboring millions and critic of the Cold War, a man dedicated to animating global political revolution. Mullen argues that Du Bois believed that the Cold War stalemate could create the conditions in which the world powers could achieve not only peace but workers’ democracy. Un-American shows Du Bois to be deeply engaged in international networks and personal relationships with revolutionaries in India, China, and Africa. Mullen explores how thinkers like Karl Marx, Jawaharlal Nehru, Mohandas Gandhi, and C.L.R. James helped him develop a theory of world revolution at a stage in his life when most commentators regard him as marginalized. This original political biography also challenges assessments of Du Bois as an American “race man.”

Facing the Rising Sun

Author: Gerald Horne
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 147984859X
Format: PDF, ePub
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The surprising alliance between Japan and pro-Tokyo African Americans during World War II In November 1942 in East St. Louis, Illinois a group of African Americans engaged in military drills were eagerly awaiting a Japanese invasion of the U.S.— an invasion that they planned to join. Since the rise of Japan as a superpower less than a century earlier, African Americans across class and ideological lines had saluted the Asian nation, not least because they thought its very existence undermined the pervasive notion of “white supremacy.” The list of supporters included Booker T. Washington, Marcus Garvey, and particularly W.E.B. Du Bois. Facing the Rising Sun tells the story of the widespread pro-Tokyo sentiment among African Americans during World War II, arguing that the solidarity between the two groups was significantly corrosive to the U.S. war effort. Gerald Horne demonstrates that Black Nationalists of various stripes were the vanguard of this trend—including followers of Garvey and the precursor of the Nation of Islam. Indeed, many of them called themselves “Asiatic”, not African. Following World War II, Japanese-influenced “Afro-Asian” solidarity did not die, but rather foreshadowed Dr. Martin Luther King’s tie to Gandhi’s India and Black Nationalists’ post-1970s fascination with Maoist China and Ho’s Vietnam. Based upon exhaustive research, including the trial transcripts of the pro-Tokyo African Americans who were tried during the war, congressional archives and records of the Negro press, this book also provides essential background for what many analysts consider the coming “Asian Century.” An insightful glimpse into the Black Nationalists’ struggle for global leverage and new allies, Facing the Rising Sun provides a complex, holistic perspective on a painful period in African American history, and a unique glimpse into the meaning of “the enemy of my enemy is my friend.”