AIDS Doctors

Author: Ronald Bayer
Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand
ISBN: 9780195152395
Format: PDF, Docs
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Based on interviews with nearly 80 doctors involved in the early years of the AIDS epidemic, this candid account details the palpable anxiety in the medical profession as it experienced a rapid succession of cases for which there was no clinical history.

AIDS Doctors

Author: Ronald Bayer
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190288213
Format: PDF, ePub
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Today, AIDS has been indelibly etched in our consciousness. Yet it was less than twenty years ago that doctors confronted a sudden avalanche of strange, inexplicable, seemingly untreatable conditions that signaled the arrival of a devastating new disease. Bewildered, unprepared, and pushed to the limit of their diagnostic abilities, a select group of courageous physicians nevertheless persevered. This unique collective memoir tells their story. Based on interviews with nearly eighty doctors whose lives and careers have centered on the AIDS epidemic from the early 1980s to the present, this candid, emotionally textured account details the palpable anxiety in the medical profession as it experienced a rapid succession of cases for which there was no clinical history. The physicians interviewed chronicle the roller coaster experiences of hope and despair, as they applied newly developed, often unsuccessful therapies. Yet these physicians who chose to embrace the challenge confronted more than just the sense of therapeutic helplessness in dealing with a disease they could not conquer. They also faced the tough choices inherent in treating a controversial, sexually and intravenously transmitted illness as many colleagues simply walked away. Many describe being gripped by a sense of mission: by the moral imperative to treat the disempowered and despised. Nearly all describe a common purpose, an esprit de corps that bound them together in a terrible yet exhilarating war against an invisible enemy. This extraordinary oral history forms a landmark effort in the understanding of the AIDS crisis. Carefully collected and eloquently told, the doctors' narratives reveal the tenacity and unquenchable optimism that has paved the way for taming a 20th-century plague.

AIDS Doctors

Author: Ronald Bayer
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN:
Format: PDF, Kindle
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A sweeping narrative of the AIDS epidemic chronicles the terrifying early years to the current climate of therapeutic optimisim, weaving together the intensely personal stories of the doctors who first confronted the crisis.

Shattered Dreams

Author: Gerald M. Oppenheimer
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199719129
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Shattered Dreams? is an oral history of how physicians and nurses in South Africa struggled to ride the tiger of the world's most catastrophic AIDS epidemic. Based on interviews-not only from the great urban centers of Johannesburg, Cape Town and Durban-but from provincial centers and rural villages, this book captures the experience of health care workers as they confronted indifference from colleagues, opposition from superiors, unexpected resistance from the country's political leaders, and material scarcity that was both the legacy of Apartheid and a consequence of the global power of the international pharmaceutical industry.

Dread

Author: Philip Alcabes
Publisher: ReadHowYouWant.com
ISBN: 145878276X
Format: PDF
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The average individual is far more likely to die in a car accident than from a communicable disease yet we are still much more fearful of the epidemic. Even at our most level-headed, the thought of an epidemic can inspire terror. As Philip Alcabes persuasively argues in Dread, our anxieties about epidemics are created not so much by the germ or microbe in question - or the actual risks of contagion - but by the unknown, the undesirable, and the misunderstood. Alcabes examines epidemics through history to show how they reflect the particular social and cultural anxieties of their times. From Typhoid Mary to bioterrorism, as new outbreaks are unleashed or imagined, new fears surface, new enemies are born, and new behaviors emerge. Dread dissects the fascinating story of the imagined epidemic: the one that we think is happening, or might happen; the one that disguises moral judgments and political agendas, the one that ultimately expresses our deepest fears.

And the Band Played On

Author: Randy Shilts
Publisher: St. Martin's Griffin
ISBN: 9781429930390
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Upon it's first publication twenty years ago, And The Band Played on was quickly recognized as a masterpiece of investigative reporting. An international bestseller, a nominee for the National Book Critics Circle Award, and made into a critically acclaimed movie, Shilts' expose revealed why AIDS was allowed to spread unchecked during the early 80's while the most trusted institutions ignored or denied the threat. One of the few true modern classics, it changed and framed how AIDS was discussed in the following years. Now republished in a special 20th Anniversary edition, And the Band Played On remains one of the essential books of our time.

Taking Turns

Author: MK Czerwiec
Publisher: Penn State Press
ISBN: 0271079657
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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In 1994, at the height of the AIDS epidemic in the United States, MK Czerwiec took her first nursing job, at Illinois Masonic Medical Center in Chicago, as part of the caregiving staff of HIV/AIDS Care Unit 371. Taking Turns pulls back the curtain on life in the ward. A shining example of excellence in the treatment and care of patients, Unit 371 was a community for thousands of patients and families affected by HIV and AIDS and the people who cared for them. This graphic novel combines Czerwiec’s memories with the oral histories of patients, family members, and staff. It depicts life and death in the ward, the ways the unit affected and informed those who passed through it, and how many look back on their time there today. Czerwiec joined Unit 371 at a pivotal time in the history of AIDS: deaths from the syndrome in the Midwest peaked in 1995 and then dropped drastically in the following years, with the release of antiretroviral protease inhibitors. This positive turn of events led to a decline in patient populations and, ultimately, to the closure of Unit 371. Czerwiec’s restrained, inviting drawing style and carefully considered narrative examine individual, institutional, and community responses to the AIDS epidemic—as well as the role that art can play in the grieving process. Deeply personal yet made up of many voices, this history of daily life in a unique AIDS care unit is an open, honest look at suffering, grief, and hope among a community of medical professionals and patients at the heart of the epidemic.

AIDS in New York

Author: Jean Ashton
Publisher: Scala Books
ISBN: 9781857599350
Format: PDF, ePub
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New York lived in fear. In the early 1980s, a mysterious infectious disease began to kill gays, their partners, and children, as well as injected drug users and blood transfusion patients. Then unnamed, with research funding and support for the dying unavailable, the HIV/AIDS virus would eventually take nearly one hundred million lives. With America's largest gay population, New York was hit early and hard by AIDS. And a silent City Hall and sensationalist tabloid headlines spread homophobia and panic. Yet within months the city's gay community and concerned medical professionals mobilized, fighting disinformation and attacks on sufferers' civil liberties, and lobbying for funds for medical and social outreach. In forceful narrative and vivid images, AIDS in New York: The First Five Years, based on the acclaimed 2013 exhibition at the New-York Historical Society, recaptures the first five years of the epidemic, culminating in the widespread public awareness of its dangers following the death of movie star Rock Hudson in 1985. It speaks especially to those too young to remember those painful years and those who conflate New York's AIDS story with later successful gay advocacy and drug breakthroughs. It reminds readers that epidemics make social and ethical demands, test the values of a society, and kill through taboos as well as disease. ..".brings to life a period when AIDS began to infect not just the body but the body politic." - The New York Times, about the exhibition at the New York Historical Society upon which the book is based."

Homosexuality and American Psychiatry

Author: Ronald Bayer
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 0691028370
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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In 1973, after several years of bitter dispute, the Board of Trustees of the American Psychiatric Association decided to remove homosexuality from its official list of mental diseases. Infuriated by the Board's action, a substantial number of dissident psychiatrists charged the association's leadership with capitulating to the pressures of Gay Liberation groups, and forced the board to submit its decision to a referendum of the full APA membership. Ronald Bayer presents a political analysis of the psychiatric battle involved, from the first confrontations organized by gay demonstrators at psychiatric conventions to the referendum initiated by orthodox psychiatrists. The result is a fascinating view of the individuals who led the debate and the fundamental questions that engaged them: social and cultural values, the definition of disease, and the nature of sexuality. Available for the first time in paperback, the book includes a new afterword by the author.

Patient Zero and the Making of the AIDS Epidemic

Author: Richard A. McKay
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022606400X
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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The search for a “patient zero”—popularly understood to be the first person infected in an epidemic—has been key to media coverage of major infectious disease outbreaks for more than three decades. Yet the term itself did not exist before the emergence of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the 1980s. How did this idea so swiftly come to exert such a strong grip on the scientific, media, and popular consciousness? In Patient Zero, Richard A. McKay interprets a wealth of archival sources and interviews to demonstrate how this seemingly new concept drew upon centuries-old ideas—and fears—about contagion and social disorder. McKay presents a carefully documented and sensitively written account of the life of Gaétan Dugas, a gay man whose skin cancer diagnosis in 1980 took on very different meanings as the HIV/AIDS epidemic developed—and who received widespread posthumous infamy when he was incorrectly identified as patient zero of the North American outbreak. McKay shows how investigators from the US Centers for Disease Control inadvertently created the term amid their early research into the emerging health crisis; how an ambitious journalist dramatically amplified the idea in his determination to reframe national debates about AIDS; and how many individuals grappled with the notion of patient zero—adopting, challenging and redirecting its powerful meanings—as they tried to make sense of and respond to the first fifteen years of an unfolding epidemic. With important insights for our interconnected age, Patient Zero untangles the complex process by which individuals and groups create meaning and allocate blame when faced with new disease threats. What McKay gives us here is myth-smashing revisionist history at its best.