America Compromised

Author: Lawrence Lessig
Publisher:
ISBN: 022631653X
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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"There is not a single American awake to the world who is comfortable with the way things are." So begins Lawrence Lessig's sweeping indictment of contemporary American institutions and the corruption that besets them. We can all see it--from the selling of Congress to special interests to the corporate capture of the academy. Something is wrong. It's getting worse. And it's our fault. What Lessig shows, brilliantly and persuasively, is that we can't blame the problems of contemporary American life on bad people, as our discourse all too often tends to do. Rather, he explains, "We have allowed core institutions of America's economic, social, and political life to become corrupted. Not by evil souls, but by good souls. Not through crime, but through compromise." Every one of us, every day, making the modest compromises that seem necessary to keep moving along, is contributing to the rot at the core of American civic life. Through case studies of Congress, finance, the academy, the media, and the law, Lessig shows how institutions are drawn away from higher purposes and toward money, power, quick rewards--the first steps to corruption. Lessig knows that a charge so broad should not be levied lightly, and that our instinct will be to resist it. So he brings copious, damning detail gleaned from years of research, building a case that is all but incontrovertible: America is on the wrong path. If we don't acknowledge our own part in that, and act now to change it, we will hand our children a less perfect union than we were given. It will be a long struggle. This book represents the first steps.

Institutional Corruption

Author: Seumas Miller
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521869463
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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This book integrates theoretical accounts of corruption with practical approaches to combating corruption in various public- and private-sector settings.

The Invention of Nature

Author: Andrea Wulf
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0385350678
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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The acclaimed author of Founding Gardeners reveals the forgotten life of Alexander von Humboldt, the visionary German naturalist whose ideas changed the way we see the natural world—and in the process created modern environmentalism. NATIONAL BEST SELLER One of the New York Times 10 Best Books of the Year Winner of the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, The James Wright Award for Nature Writing, the Costa Biography Award, the Royal Geographic Society's Ness Award, the Sigurd F. Olson Nature Writing Award Finalist for the Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Nonfiction, the Kirkus Prize Prize for Nonfiction, the Independent Bookshop Week Book Award A Best Book of the Year: The New York Times, The Atlantic, The Economist, Nature, Jezebel, Kirkus Reviews, Publishers Weekly, New Scientist, The Independent, The Telegraph, The Sunday Times, The Evening Standard, The Spectator Alexander von Humboldt (1769–1859) was an intrepid explorer and the most famous scientist of his age. In North America, his name still graces four counties, thirteen towns, a river, parks, bays, lakes, and mountains. His restless life was packed with adventure and discovery, whether he was climbing the highest volcanoes in the world or racing through anthrax-infected Siberia or translating his research into bestselling publications that changed science and thinking. Among Humboldt’s most revolutionary ideas was a radical vision of nature, that it is a complex and interconnected global force that does not exist for the use of humankind alone. Now Andrea Wulf brings the man and his achievements back into focus: his daring expeditions and investigation of wild environments around the world and his discoveries of similarities between climate and vegetation zones on different continents. She also discusses his prediction of human-induced climate change, his remarkable ability to fashion poetic narrative out of scientific observation, and his relationships with iconic figures such as Simón Bolívar and Thomas Jefferson. Wulf examines how Humboldt’s writings inspired other naturalists and poets such as Darwin, Wordsworth, and Goethe, and she makes the compelling case that it was Humboldt’s influence that led John Muir to his ideas of natural preservation and that shaped Thoreau’s Walden. With this brilliantly researched and compellingly written book, Andrea Wulf shows the myriad fundamental ways in which Humboldt created our understanding of the natural world, and she champions a renewed interest in this vital and lost player in environmental history and science. From the Hardcover edition.

Compromise and Resistance in Postcolonial Writing

Author: Alberto Fernández Carbajal
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137288930
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Compromise and Resistance in Postcolonial Writing offers a new critical approach to E. M. Forster's legacy. It examines key themes in Forster's work (homosexuality, humanism, modernism, liberalism) and their relevance to post-imperial and postcolonial novels by important contemporary writers.

Der Europ ische Traum

Author: Jeremy Rifkin
Publisher: Campus Verlag
ISBN: 3593400928
Format: PDF, ePub
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Welches politische System bietet langfristig Frieden, Gerechtigkeit und Humanität? Jeremy Rifkin macht sich auf die Suche nach einer neuen, zukunftsfähigen Weltordnung. Und er findet sie - in Europa. Der alte Kontinent ist der Hoffnungsträger für eine gerechtere Welt.

American best sellers

Author: Karen Hinckley
Publisher: Indiana Univ Pr
ISBN:
Format: PDF, ePub
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This book is a comprehensive listing and analysis of the best-selling hard-cover fiction from 1965 to 1985, with an update for the most recent books. It is based on the World Almanac's annual report of books with the highest U.S. sales and includes nearly five hundred titles and over two hundred authors.