American Ambassador

Author: Waldo H. Heinrichs Jr.
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780195364767
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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The story of Joseph Clark Grew (1880-1965) is the story of the modern American diplomatic tradition. Grew served the U.S. government for over forty years, with an impressive career that included two ambassadorships, two secretaryships, two ministerships, and every junior rank in the service. Grew was in Berlin when the U.S. went to war with Germany in 1917, was American Ambassador to Japan during the years leading up to Pearl Harbor, was Undersecretary of State during the war, and was instrumental in planning U.S. postwar strategy in the Far East. In this rich and intimate biography, Heinrichs draws on Grew's vast diary, correspondence, and several private and official collections to reconstruct the life of an extraordinary career diplomat. Here, Joseph C. Grew emerges as a man of peace who used both skill and insight to slow the world's progress toward World War II.

American Ambassador

Author: Waldo H. Heinrichs
Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand
ISBN: 0195041593
Format: PDF, Docs
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The definitive biography of Grew, who was American Ambassador to Japan in the years leading up to Pearl Harbor, and Under Secretary of State during the Second World War.

Aftermath of War

Author: Howard B. Schonberger
Publisher: Kent State University Press
ISBN: 9780873383820
Format: PDF, ePub
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Index and bibliography included.

The A to Z of U S Diplomacy from World War I through World War II

Author: Martin Folly
Publisher: Scarecrow Press
ISBN: 1461672414
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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The A to Z of U.S. Diplomacy from World War I through World War II relates the events of this crucial period in U.S. history through a chronology, an introductory essay, and over 600 cross-referenced dictionary entries on key persons, places, events, institutions, and organizations.

Spreading the American Dream

Author: Emily Rosenberg
Publisher: Hill and Wang
ISBN: 1429952253
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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In examining the economic and cultural trs that expressed America's expansionist impulse during the first half of the twentieth century, Emily S. Rosenberg shows how U.S. foreign relations evolved from a largely private system to an increasingly public one and how, soon, the American dream became global.

Admirals of the New Steel Navy

Author: James C. Bradford
Publisher: Naval Institute Press
ISBN: 1612512593
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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This collection of essays examines the lives of thirteen naval officers whose careers had lasting effects on the evolution of American naval traditions.

Defeating Japan

Author: Charles F. Brower
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137025220
Format: PDF, Mobi
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This book argues that American strategists in the Joint Chiefs of Staff were keenly aware of the inseparability of political and military aspects of strategy in the fight against Japan in World War II. They understood that war not only has political sources, it also has political purposes that establish the war's objectives and help to define the nature of the peace to follow. They understood that policy was the 'guiding intelligence' for war, in Clausewitzian terms, and that to attempt to approach strategic problems was nonsensical.

Threshold of War Franklin D Roosevelt and American Entry into World War II

Author: Waldo Heinrichs Professor of History Temple University
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0198021364
Format: PDF, Docs
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For Franklin D. Roosevelt, the spring of 1941 was a time of uncertainty and fear. Hitler's armies were poised to strike, but no one was sure where the next attack would come. The United States had begun its military build-up, but as yet the Army and Navy were ill-prepared for war with Germany and Japan. And though the American public was not ready to support an unprovoked declaration of war, Churchill and members of Roosevelt's administration were urging him to intervene before it was too late. ___In Threshold of War, the first comprehensive treatment of the American entry into World War II to appear in over thirty-five years, eminent historian Waldo Heinrichs places American policy in a global context, covering both the European and Asian diplomatic and military scene, with Roosevelt ("the only figure with all the threads in his hands") at the center. In a tale of ever-broadening conflict, this vivid narrative weaves back and forth from the battlefields in the Soviet Union, to the intense policy debates within Roosevelt's administration, to the sinking of the battleship Bismarck, to the precarious and delicate negotiations with Japan. Of particular interest is Heinrichs' portrait of Roosevelt. Roosevelt has often been portrayed as vacillating, impulsive, and disorganized in his decision-making during this period. But here he emerges as a leader who acted with extreme caution and deliberation, who always kept his options open, and who, once Hitler's invasion of the Soviet Union stalled in July, 1941, acted rapidly and with great determination, sending supplies to Stalin, placing an oil embargo on Japan, and ordering armed escorts of vital supplies to Europe. ___A masterful account of a key moment in American history, Threshold of War is both a distinguished work of scholarship and a moving narrative that captures the tension as Roosevelt, Churchill, Stimson, Hull, and numerous others struggled to shape American policy in the climactic nine months before Pearl Harbor.