American Indian Activism

Author: Troy R. Johnson
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 9780252066535
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Recounts the occupation of Alcatraz Island by Native American activists from 1969 to 1971, and places it in the context of organized Indian struggles in the 1960s and 1970s.

Like a Hurricane

Author: Paul Chaat Smith
Publisher: ReadHowYouWant.com
ISBN: 145877872X
Format: PDF, Docs
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For a brief but brilliant season beginning in the late 1960s, American Indians seized national attention in a series of radical acts of resistance. Like a Hurricane is a gripping account of the dramatic, breathtaking events of this tumultuous period. Drawing on a wealth of archival materials, interviews, and the authors' own experiences of these events, Like a Hurricane offers a rare, unflinchingly honest assessment of the period's successes and failures.

Beyond Red Power

Author: Daniel M. Cobb
Publisher: School for Advanced Research on the
ISBN:
Format: PDF, Kindle
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How do we explain not just the survival of Indian people in the United States against very long odds but their growing visibility and political power at the opening of the twenty-first century? Within this one story of indigenous persistence are many stories of local, regional, national, and international activism that require a nuanced understanding of what it means to be an activist or to act in politically purposeful ways. Even the nearly universal demand for sovereignty encompasses multiple definitions that derive from factors both external and internal to Indian communities. Struggles over the form and membership of tribal governments, fishing rights, dances, casinos, language revitalization, and government recognition constitute arenas in which Indians and their non-Indian allies ensure the survival of tribal community and sovereignty. Whether contesting termination locally, demanding reparations for stolen lands in the federal courts, or placing their case for decolonization in a global context, American Indians use institutions and political rhetorics that they did not necessarily create to their own ends.

Encyclopedia of the American Indian Movement

Author: Bruce E. Johansen
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 1440803188
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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A vivid description of the people, events, and issues that forever changed the lives of Native Americans during the 1960s and 1970s—such as the occupation of Alcatraz, fishing-rights conflicts, and individuals such as Clyde Warrior. • Compares American Indian content to Black, Latino, and Asian civil-rights movements at the same historical era • Relates the activities of the American Indian Movement to those of many regional groups that were active at the same time • Draws connections between activities in the 1960s and 1970s to outcomes today, such as a ban on Navajo uranium mining, development of reservation infrastructure, and reclamation of many Native languages

Red Power Rising

Author: Bradley G. Shreve
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
ISBN: 080618499X
Format: PDF, ePub
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During the 1960s, American Indian youth were swept up in a movement called Red Power—a civil rights struggle fueled by intertribal activism. While some define the movement as militant and others see it as peaceful, there is one common assumption about its history: Red Power began with the Indian takeover of Alcatraz in 1969. Or did it? In this groundbreaking book, Bradley G. Shreve sets the record straight by tracing the origins of Red Power further back in time: to the student activism of the National Indian Youth Council (NIYC), founded in Gallup, New Mexico, in 1961. Unlike other 1960s and ’70s activist groups that challenged the fundamental beliefs of their predecessors, the students who established the NIYC were determined to uphold the cultures and ideals of their elders, building on a tradition of pan-Indian organization dating back to the early twentieth century. Their cornerstone principles of tribal sovereignty, self determination, treaty rights, and cultural preservation helped ensure their survival, for in contrast to other activist groups that came and went, the NIYC is still in operation today. But Shreve also shows that the NIYC was very much a product of 1960s idealistic ferment and its leaders learned tactics from other contemporary leftist movements. By uncovering the origins of Red Power, Shreve writes an important new chapter in the history of American Indian activism. And by revealing the ideology and accomplishments of the NIYC, he ties the Red Power Movement to the larger struggle for human rights that continues to this day both in the United States and across the globe.

Native Activism in Cold War America

Author: Daniel M. Cobb
Publisher:
ISBN:
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Broadens the scope and meaning of American Indian political activism by focusing on the movement's early--and largely neglected--struggles, revealing how early activists exploited Cold War tensions in ways that brought national attention to their issues.

Indigenous American Women

Author: Devon Abbott Mihesuah
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 9780803282865
Format: PDF, ePub
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Oklahoma Choctaw scholar Devon Abbott Mihesuah offers a frank and absorbing look at the complex, evolving identities of American Indigenous women today, their ongoing struggles against a centuries-old legacy of colonial disempowerment, and how they are seen and portrayed by themselves and others. ø Mihesuah first examines how American Indigenous women have been perceived and depicted by non-Natives, including scholars, and by themselves. She then illuminates the pervasive impact of colonialism and patriarchal thought on Native women?s traditional tribal roles and on their participation in academia. Mihesuah considers how relations between Indigenous women and men across North America continue to be altered by Christianity and Euro-American ideologies. Sexism and violence against Indigenous women has escalated; economic disparities and intratribal factionalism and ?culturalism? threaten connections among women and with men; and many women suffer from psychological stress because their economic, religious, political, and social positions are devalued. ø In the last section, Mihesuah explores how modern American Indigenous women have empowered themselves tribally, nationally, or academically. Additionally, she examines the overlooked role that Native women played in the Red Power movement as well as some key differences between Native women "feminists" and "activists."

This Indian Country

Author: Frederick Hoxie
Publisher: Penguin Books
ISBN: 0143124021
Format: PDF, ePub
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A comprehensive history of the achievements of leading Native American civil rights activists traces 200 years of legal and political campaigns while connecting the experiences of specific individuals to the stories of their tribes. Reprint. 20,000 first printing.

City Indian

Author: Rosalyn R. LaPier
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 0803248393
Format: PDF
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In City Indian, Rosalyn R. LaPier and David R. M. Beck tell the engaging story of American Indian men and women who migrated to Chicago from across America. From the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition to the 1934 Century of Progress Fair, American Indians in Chicago voiced their opinions about political, social, educational, and racial issues. City Indian focuses on the privileged members of the American Indian community in Chicago who were doctors, nurses, business owners, teachers, and entertainers. During the Progressive Era, more than at any other time in the city’s history, they could be found in the company of politicians and society leaders, at Chicago’s major cultural venues and events, and in the press, speaking out. When Mayor “Big Bill” Thompson declared that Chicago public schools teach “America First,” American Indian leaders publicly challenged him to include the true story of “First Americans.” As they struggled to reshape nostalgic perceptions of American Indians, these men and women developed new associations and organizations to help each other and to ultimately create a new place to call home in a modern American city.