American Indian Education 2nd Edition

Author: Jon Reyhner
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
ISBN: 0806159901
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Before Europeans arrived in North America, Indigenous peoples spoke more than three hundred languages and followed almost as many distinct belief systems and lifeways. But in childrearing, the different Indian societies had certain practices in common—including training for survival and teaching tribal traditions. The history of American Indian education from colonial times to the present is a story of how Euro-Americans disrupted and suppressed these common cultural practices, and how Indians actively pursued and preserved them. American Indian Education recounts that history from the earliest missionary and government attempts to Christianize and “civilize” Indian children to the most recent efforts to revitalize Native cultures and return control of schools to Indigenous peoples. Extensive firsthand testimony from teachers and students offers unique insight into the varying experiences of Indian education. Historians and educators Jon Reyhner and Jeanne Eder begin by discussing Indian childrearing practices and the work of colonial missionaries in New France (Canada), New England, Mexico, and California, then conduct readers through the full array of government programs aimed at educating Indian children. From the passage of the Civilization Act of 1819 to the formation of the Bureau of Indian Affairs in 1824 and the establishment of Indian reservations and vocation-oriented boarding schools, the authors frame Native education through federal policy eras: treaties, removal, assimilation, reorganization, termination, and self-determination. Thoroughly updated for this second edition, American Indian Education is the most comprehensive single-volume account, useful for students, educators, historians, activists, and public servants interested in the history and efficacy of educational reforms past and present.

Widening the Circle

Author: Beverly J. Klug
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136063382
Format: PDF, Docs
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Recognizing the need for a pedagogy that better serves American Indian students, Beverly J. Klug and Patricia T. Whitfield construct a pedagogical model that blends native and non-native worldviews and methods. Among the building blocks of this new, culturally relevant education are language-based approaches to literacy development, the use of oral histories to supplement traditional texts, and a re-evaluation of the knowledge base these students need for success in tribal enterprises.

Education and the American Indian

Author: Margaret Szasz
Publisher: UNM Press
ISBN: 9780826320483
Format: PDF, Mobi
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First published in 1974, Education and the American Indian has been widely praised as the first full-length study of federal Indian policy. This revised edition brings the book up to date through 1998 with the addition of analysis and interpretation of trends and policies that have shaped Indian education in the 1980s and 1990s and will persist into the twenty-first century. In looking ahead, one Yankton Sioux forecasts that "within two generations we will see some of the most educated people in the world and they will be on reservations." How such an optimistic assessment might become a reality is one of the major themes of this revised edition.

Teaching American Indian Students

Author: Jon Allan Reyhner
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
ISBN: 9780806126746
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Teaching American Indian Students is the most comprehensive resource book available for educators of American Indians. The promise of this book is that Indian students can improve their academic performance through educational approaches that do not force students to choose between the culture of their home and the culture of their school. This multidisciplinary volume summarizes the latest research on Indian education, provides practical suggestions for teachers, and offers a vast selection of resources available to teachers of Indian students. Included are chapters on bilingual and multicultural education; the history of U.S. Indian education; teacher-parent relationships; language and literacy development, with particular discussion of English as a second language and American Indian literature; and teaching in the content areas of social science, science, mathematics, and physical education.

American Indian Education

Author: Matthew L. M. Fletcher
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135908273
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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America Indian culture and traditions have survived an unusual amount of oppressive federal and state educational policies intended to assimilate Indian people and destroy their cultures and languages. Yet, Indian culture, traditions, and people often continue to be treated as objects in the classroom and in the curriculum. Using a critical race theory framework and a unique "counternarrative" methodology, American Indian Education explores a host of modern educational issues facing American Indian peoples—from the impact of Indian sports mascots on students and communities, to the uses and abuses of law that often never reach a courtroom, and the intergenerational impacts of American Indian education policy on Indian children today. By interweaving empirical research with accessible composite narratives, Matthew Fletcher breaches the gap between solid educational policy and the on-the-ground reality of Indian students, highlighting the challenges faced by American Indian students and paving the way for an honest discussion about solutions.

Boarding School Blues

Author: Clifford E. Trafzer
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 9780803294639
Format: PDF, ePub
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An in depth look at boarding schools and their effect on the Native students.

To Live Heroically

Author: Delores J. Huff
Publisher: SUNY Press
ISBN: 9780791432372
Format: PDF, ePub
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Analyzes American Indian education in the last century and compares the tribal, mission, and Bureau of Indian Affairs schools.

Indian Education in the American Colonies 1607 1783

Author:
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 9780803233836
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Armed with Bible and primer, missionaries and teachers in colonial America sought, in their words, “to Christianize and civilize the native heathen.” Both the attempts to transform Indians via schooling and the Indians' reaction to such efforts are closely studied for the first time in Indian Education in the American Colonies, 1607–1783. Margaret Connell Szasz’s remarkable synthesis of archival and published materials is a detailed and engaging story told from both Indian and European perspectives. Szasz argues that the most intriguing dimension of colonial Indian education came with the individuals who tried to work across cultures. We learn of the remarkable accomplishments of two Algonquian students at Harvard, of the Creek woman Mary Musgrove who enabled James Oglethorpe and the Georgians to establish peaceful relations with the Creek Nation, and of Algonquian minister Samson Occom, whose intermediary skills led to the founding of Dartmouth College. The story of these individuals and their compatriots plus the numerous experiments in Indian schooling provide a new way of looking at Indian-white relations and colonial Indian education.

Community Self Determination

Author: John J. Laukaitis
Publisher: SUNY Press
ISBN: 1438457707
Format: PDF, Docs
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Examines the educational programs American Indians developed to preserve their cultural and ethnic identity, improve their livelihood, and serve the needs of their youth in Chicago. After World War II, American Indians began relocating to urban areas in large numbers, in search of employment. Partly influenced by the Bureau of Indian Affairs, this migration from rural reservations to metropolitan centers presented both challenges and opportunities. This history examines the educational programs American Indians developed in Chicago and gives particular attention to how the American Indian community chose its own distinct path within and outside of the larger American Indian self-determination movement. In what John J. Laukaitis terms community self-determination, American Indians in Chicago demonstrated considerable agency as they developed their own programs and worked within already existent institutions. The community-based initiatives included youth programs at the American Indian Center and St. Augustine’s Center for American Indians, the Native American Committee’s Adult Learning Center, Little Big Horn High School, O-Wai-Ya-Wa Elementary School, Native American Educational Services College, and the Institute for Native American Development at Truman College. Community Self-Determination presents the first major examination of these initiatives and programs and provides an understanding of how education functioned as a form of activism for Chicago’s American Indian community. “John Laukaitis has produced an important book on the role of education in the Chicago American Indian community. His meticulous research in a wide array of manuscript collections and extensive oral interviews clearly convey to readers that he knows the city, knows the places, and knows the people.” — Daniel M. Cobb, author of Native Activism in Cold War America: The Struggle for Sovereignty