American Indian Identity Citizenship Membership and Blood

Author: Se-ah-dom Edmo
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 1440831475
Format: PDF, Kindle
Download Now
This single-volume book contends that reshaping the paradigm of American Indian identity, blood quantum, and racial distinctions can positively impact the future of the Indian community within America and America itself. • Addresses legal and historical issues about Indian identity and multiple citizenships that have never before been covered in a text • Sums up the issues, discussion, and proposed solutions to the questions surrounding Indian identity • Sounds an awakening call to tribal leaders regarding the threat of extermination if they continue to rely on the paradigm of blood quantum instead of citizenship to define Indian identity • Provides a voice that reaches out to and finds common cause with indigenous brothers and sisters in the world of former British colonies

Sharp Knife Andrew Jackson and the American Indians

Author: Alfred A. Cave
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 1440860408
Format: PDF
Download Now
Drawing on a wide range of sources, this book exposes Andrew Jackson's failure to honor and enforce federal laws and treaties protecting Indian rights, describing how the Indian policies of "Old Hickory" were those of a racist imperialist, in stark contrast to how his followers characterized him, believing him to be a champion of democracy. • Offers a chronological account of the life of Andrew Jackson, with particular attention to his interactions with Native American peoples as he advanced through various positions of power • Provides an extremely detailed look at Andrew Jackson's abuse of power in dealing with Native Americans and at the underlying racist ideology that, in Jackson's mind, justified his denial of the rights they had previously been guaranteed under federal law • Presents fascinating factual information that will interest general readers, in particular individuals concerned with the origins and impact of racism in American history; with the U.S. presidency; and with the abuse of presidential power

Urban American Indians Reclaiming Native Space

Author: Donna Martinez
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 1440832080
Format: PDF
Download Now
An outstanding resource for contemporary American Indians as well as students and scholars interested in community and ethnicity, this book dispels the myth that all American Indians live on reservations and are plagued with problems, and serves to illustrate a unique, dynamic model of community formation. • Presents information on an important topic—the growing number of American Indians living in urban areas—and sheds light on cultural problems within the United States that are largely unknown to the average American • Familiarizes readers with the policies of the U.S. federal government that created diasporas, removals, reservations, and relocations for American Indians • Encourages readers to consider fresh perspectives on urban American histories and exposes readers to a thorough analysis of colonial space, race, resistance, and cultural endurance • Written by expert scholars and civic leaders who are themselves American Indian

Blood Will Tell

Author: Katherine Ellinghaus
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 0803225431
Format: PDF
Download Now
"A study of the role blood quantum played in the assimilation period between 1887 and 1934 in the United States"--

Who Belongs

Author: Mikaëla M. Adams
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190619465
Format: PDF
Download Now
Who can lay claim to a legally-recognized Indian identity? Who decides whether or not an individual qualifies? The right to determine tribal citizenship is fundamental to tribal sovereignty, but deciding who belongs has a complicated history, especially in the South. Indians who remained in the South following removal became a marginalized and anomalous people in an emerging biracial world. Despite the economic hardships and assimilationist pressures they faced, they insisted on their political identity as citizens of tribal nations and rejected Euro-American efforts to reduce them to another racial minority, especially in the face of Jim Crow segregation. Drawing upon their cultural traditions, kinship patterns, and evolving needs to protect their land, resources, and identity from outsiders, southern Indians constructed tribally-specific citizenship criteria, in part by manipulating racial categories - like blood quantum - that were not traditional elements of indigenous cultures. Mikaëla M. Adams investigates how six southern tribes-the Pamunkey Indian Tribe of Virginia, the Catawba Indian Nation of South Carolina, the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians of North Carolina, the Seminole Tribe of Florida, and the Miccosukee Tribe of Indians of Florida-decided who belonged. By focusing on the rights and resources at stake, the effects of state and federal recognition, the influence of kinship systems and racial ideologies, and the process of creating official tribal rolls, Adams reveals how Indians established legal identities. Through examining the nineteenth and twentieth century histories of these Southern tribes, Who Belongs? quashes the notion of an essential "Indian" and showcases the constantly-evolving process of defining tribal citizenship.

Encyclopedia of Race Ethnicity and Society

Author: Richard T. Schaefer
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 1412926947
Format: PDF
Download Now
This three volume reference set offers a comprehensive look at the roles race and ethnicity play in society and in our daily lives. General readers, students, and scholars alike will appreciate the informative coverage of intergroup relations in the United States and the comparative examination of race and ethnicity worldwide. These volumes offer a foundation to understanding as well as researching racial and ethnic diversity from a multidisciplinary perspective. Over a hundred racial and ethnic groups are described, with additional thematic essays offering insight into broad topics that cut across group boundaries and which impact on society. The encyclopedia has alphabetically arranged author-signed essays with references to guide further reading. Numerous cross-references aid the reader to explore beyond specific entries, reflecting the interdependent nature of race and ethnicity operating in society. The text is supplemented by photographs, tables, figures and custom-designed maps to provide an engaging visual look at race and ethnicity. An easy-to-use statistical appendix offers the latest data with carefully selected historical comparisons to aid study and research in the area

Queering the Biopolitics of Citizenship in the Age of Obama

Author: J. Rohrer
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137488204
Format: PDF
Download Now
The book from the interdisciplinary fields of queer theory, critical race theory, feminist political theory, disability studies, and indigenous studies to demonstrate that analyzing contemporary notions of citizenship requires understanding the machinations of governmentality and biopolitics in the (re)production of the proper citizen.

The United States of the United Races

Author: Greg Carter
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 081477251X
Format: PDF
Download Now
Barack Obama’s historic presidency has re-inserted mixed race into the national conversation. While the troubled and pejorative history of racial amalgamation throughout U.S. history is a familiar story, The United States of the United Races reconsiders an understudied optimist tradition, one which has praised mixture as a means to create a new people, bring equality to all, and fulfill an American destiny. In this genealogy, Greg Carter re-envisions racial mixture as a vehicle for pride and a way for citizens to examine mixed America as a better America. Tracing the centuries-long conversation that began with Hector St. John de Crevecoeur’s Letters of an American Farmer in the 1780s through to the Mulitracial Movement of the 1990s and the debates surrounding racial categories on the U.S. Census in the twenty-first century, Greg Carter explores a broad range of documents and moments, unearthing a new narrative that locates hope in racial mixture. Carter traces the reception of the concept as it has evolved over the years, from and decade to decade and century to century, wherein even minor changes in individual attitudes have paved the way for major changes in public response. The United States of the United Races sweeps away an ugly element of U.S. history, replacing it with a new understanding of race in America.

Real Indians

Author: Eva Garroutte
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520935921
Format: PDF, ePub
Download Now
At the dawn of the twenty-first century, America finds itself on the brink of a new racial consciousness. The old, unquestioned confidence with which individuals can be classified (as embodied, for instance, in previous U.S. census categories) has been eroded. In its place are shifting paradigms and new norms for racial identity. Eva Marie Garroutte examines the changing processes of racial identification and their implications by looking specifically at the case of American Indians.