American Nightfighter Aces of World War 2

Author: Warren Thompson
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 1846037794
Format: PDF, Docs
Download Now
The Americans lagged behind their European contemporaries in military aviation in the late 1930s, and it took the Battle of Britain to awaken America to the necessity of having aircraft that could defend targets against night-time attack by bomber aircraft. This book examines the numerous aircraft types that were used by the US in this role, beginning with the early stop-gap conversions like the TBM Avenger, Lockheed Ventura and the A-20 Havoc (P-70). It goes on to detail the combat history of the newer, radar-equipped Hellcats, Corsairs and Black Widows that were designed to seek out enemy aircraft and which registered most of the kills made by the Navy, Marine Corps and USAAF in 1944–45. With full-colour profiles and rare photographs, this is an absorbing account of an underestimated flying force: the American Nightfighters.

German Night Fighter Aces of World War 2

Author: Jerry Scutts
Publisher: Osprey Publishing
ISBN: 9781855326965
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download Now
When the Luftwaffe entered World War 2, its nightfighter force was virtually nonexistent thanks to its leader, Reichmarschall Hermann Göring, who boasted that bombs would never fall on Germany. By mid-1940 his folly was evident; the first night fighter wing was hastily formed with Bf 110s. Initially capable of detecting targets by visual acquisition only, the force greatly improved its effectiveness with the creation of the 'Giant Würzburg' radar chain. By the end of 1942, the night fighter force controlled some 389 fighters and had destroyed 1,291 RAF bombers in that year alone. Complete with first-hand accounts and detailed colour illustrations, this book profiles the many variations of night fighters, and the men who made ace flying them.

Der rote Kampfflieger

Author: Manfred von Richthofen
Publisher: Jazzybee Verlag
ISBN: 3849625222
Format: PDF, Docs
Download Now
Manfred Albrecht Freiherr von Richthofen (* 2. Mai 1892 in Breslau; † 21. April 1918 bei Vaux-sur-Somme, Département Somme) war ein deutscher Jagdflieger im Ersten Weltkrieg. Er erzielte die höchste Zahl von Luftsiegen, die im Ersten Weltkrieg von einem einzelnen Piloten erreicht wurde. Den berühmten Beinamen „Der Rote Baron“ erhielt von Richthofen, der einen Großteil seiner Einsätze in mehr oder weniger rot gestrichenen Flugzeugen flog, erst nach dem Krieg. Er geht vermutlich auf ein englisches Nachkriegsbuch zurück, das seinen Titel „Freiherr“, den es im Englischen nicht gibt, mit „Baron“ übersetzte. Im Ersten Weltkrieg wurde Richthofen auf französischer Seite « le petit rouge » (deutsch: „Der kleine Rote“) oder auch « Rouge diable » (deutsch: „Roter Teufel“) genannt. Seine gesammelten Tagebücher tragen den Titel „Der rote Kampfflieger“. (aus wikipedia.de) Die Serie "Meisterwerke der Literatur" beinhaltet die Klassiker der deutschen und weltweiten Literatur in einer einzigartigen Sammlung für Ihren eBook Reader. Lesen Sie die besten Werke großer Schriftsteller,Poeten, Autoren und Philosophen auf Ihrem Reader. Dieses Werk bietet zusätzlich * Eine detaillierte Abhandlung über die Entstehung der Militärluftfahrt.

Mosquito Aces of World War 2

Author: Andrew Thomas
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 1472801865
Format: PDF
Download Now
The Mosquito developed into one of the most versatile aircraft of World War 2, entering service with Fighter Command in early 1942. The 'Mossie' was soon defending raids on Britain's Cathedral cities and became an integral part of the country's night defences. Its airborne radar gave it the ability to 'see' the enemy at night, and its speed and devastating fire power made it the finest nightfighter deployed by any side during World War 2. This book examines the infamous Mosquito, the nightfighter that was used by many leading RAF, Commonwealth and American aces.

American Aces against the Kamikaze

Author: Edward M. Young
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 1849087466
Format: PDF, ePub
Download Now
The Japanese High Command realised that the loss of Okinawa would give the Americans a base for the invasion of Japan. Its desperate response was to unleash the full force of the Special Attack Units, known in the west as the Kamikaze ('Divine Wind'). In a series of mass attacks in between April and June 1945, more than 900 Kamikaze aeroplanes were shot down. Conventional fighters and bombers accompanied the Special Attack Units as escorts, and to add their own weight to the attacks on the US fleet. In the air battles leading up to the invasion of Okinawa, as well as those that raged over the island in the three months that followed, the Japanese lost more than 7,000 aircraft both in the air and on the ground. In the course of the fighting, 67 Navy, 21 Marine, and three USAAF pilots became aces. In many ways it was an uneven combat and on numerous occasions following these uneven contests, American fighter pilots would return from combat having shot down up to six Japanese aeroplanes during a single mission.