Ancient Peoples of the American Southwest

Author: Stephen Plog
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780500286937
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Documents some of the most relevant moments of America's prehistoric past as reflected by its ancient Southwest cultures, offering insight into the lesser-known sophistication of such people as the Anasazi, the Hohokam, and the Mogollon. Original.

The people

Author: Stephen Trimble
Publisher: School for Advanced Research on the
ISBN:
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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A portrayal of Native American life in Southern California, New Mexico, Nevada, Colorado, and Arizona describes their cultural contributions, lifestyles, struggles, and customs

A History of the Ancient Southwest

Author: Stephen H. Lekson
Publisher: School for Advanced Research on the
ISBN:
Format: PDF
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According to archaeologist Stephen H. Lekson, much of what we think we know about the Southwest has been compressed into conventions and classifications and orthodoxies. This book challenges and reconfigures these accepted notions by telling two parallel stories, one about the development, personalities, and institutions of Southwestern archaeology and the other about interpretations of what actually happened in the ancient past. While many works would have us believe that nothing much ever happened in the ancient Southwest, this book argues that the region experienced rises and falls, kings and commoners, war and peace, triumphs and failures. In this view, Chaco Canyon was a geopolitical reaction to the "Colonial Period" Hohokam expansion and the Hohokam "Classic Period" was the product of refugee Chacoan nobles, chased off the Colorado Plateau by angry farmers. Far to the south, Casas Grandes was a failed attempt to create a Mesoamerican state, and modern Pueblo people--with societies so different from those at Chaco and Casas Grandes--deliberately rejected these monumental, hierarchical episodes of their past. From the publisher: The second printing of A History of the Ancient Southwest has corrected the errors noted below. SAR Press regrets an error on Page 72, paragraph 4 (also Page 275, note 2) regarding "absolute dates." "50,000 dates" was incorrectly published as "half a million dates." Also P. 125, lines 13-14: "Between 21,000 and 27,000 people lived there" should read "Between 2,100 and 2,700 people lived there."

Ancient Puebloan Southwest

Author: John Kantner
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521788809
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Ancient Puebloan Southwest traces the evolution of Puebloan society in the American Southwest from the emergence of the Chaco and Mimbres traditions in the AD 1000s through the early decades of contact with the Spanish in the sixteenth century. The 2004 book focuses on the social and political changes that shaped Puebloan people over the centuries, emphasizing how factors internal to society impacted on cultural evolution, even in the face of the challenging environment that characterizes the American Southwest. The underlying argument is that while the physical environment both provides opportunities and sets limitations to social and political change, even more important evolutionary forces are the tensions between co-operation and competition for status and leadership. Although relying primarily on archaeological data, the book also includes oral histories, historical accounts, and ethnographic records as it introduces readers to the deep history of the Puebloan Southwest.

American Indians of the Southwest

Author: Bertha P. Dutton
Publisher: UNM Press
ISBN: 9780826307040
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Describes the history, culture, and social structure of the Pueblo, Navajo, Apache, Ute, and Paiute Indian tribes

Anasazi America

Author: David E. Stuart
Publisher: UNM Press
ISBN: 0826354793
Format: PDF
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At the height of their power in the late eleventh century, the Chaco Anasazi dominated a territory in the American Southwest larger than any European principality of the time. Developed over the course of centuries and thriving for over two hundred years, the Chacoans’ society collapsed dramatically in the twelfth century in a mere forty years. David E. Stuart incorporates extensive new research findings through groundbreaking archaeology to explore the rise and fall of the Chaco Anasazi and how it parallels patterns throughout modern societies in this new edition. Adding new research findings on caloric flows in prehistoric times and investigating the evolutionary dynamics induced by these forces as well as exploring the consequences of an increasingly detached central Chacoan decision-making structure, Stuart argues that Chaco’s failure was a failure to adapt to the consequences of rapid growth—including problems with the misuse of farmland, malnutrition, loss of community, and inability to deal with climatic catastrophe. Have modern societies learned from the experience and fate of the Chaco Anasazi, or are we risking a similar cultural collapse?

The Moundbuilders

Author: George R. Milner
Publisher: London : Thames & Hudson
ISBN: 9780500284681
Format: PDF, Docs
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Hailed by Bruce D. Smith, Curator of North American Archaeology at the Smithsonian Institution, as without question the best available book on the pre-Columbian Indian societies of eastern North America, this wide-ranging and copiously illustrated volume covers the entire sweep of Eastern Woodlands prehistory, with an emphasis on how these societies developed from hunter-gatherers to village farmers and town-dwellers.

Native Peoples of the Southwest

Author: Trudy Griffin-Pierce
Publisher: UNM Press
ISBN: 9780826319081
Format: PDF, Kindle
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"Griffin-Pierce has visited each tribal group profiled and has collaborated with native leaders to make the book as up-to-date and accurate as possible. She emphasizes throughout the multiethnic nature of the American Southwest and the living traditions of native cultures. Her book will be useful to students of anthropology, archaeology, history, and Native American studies as well as general readers."--Jacket.

Cahokia

Author: Timothy R. Pauketat
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101105178
Format: PDF
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The fascinating story of a lost city and an unprecedented American civilization While Mayan and Aztec civilizations are widely known and documented, relatively few people are familiar with the largest prehistoric Native American city north of Mexico-a site that expert Timothy Pauketat brings vividly to life in this groundbreaking book. Almost a thousand years ago, a city flourished along the Mississippi River near what is now St. Louis. Built around a sprawling central plaza and known as Cahokia, the site has drawn the attention of generations of archaeologists, whose work produced evidence of complex celestial timepieces, feasts big enough to feed thousands, and disturbing signs of human sacrifice. Drawing on these fascinating finds, Cahokia presents a lively and astonishing narrative of prehistoric America.

Introducing Archaeology

Author: Robert J. Muckle
Publisher: University of Toronto Press
ISBN: 1442607858
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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The second edition highlights recent developments in the field and includes a new chapter on archaeology beyond mainstream academia. It also integrates more examples from popular culture, including mummies, tattoos, pirates, and global warming.