Anthropology and Climate Change

Author: Susan A Crate
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1315434768
Format: PDF, Docs
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The first book to comprehensively assess anthropology’s engagement with climate change, this pioneering volume both maps out exciting trajectories for research and issues a call to action. Chapters in part one are systematic research reviews, covering the relationship between culture and climate from prehistoric times to the present; changing anthropological discourse on climate and environment; the diversity of environmental and sociocultural changes currently occurring around the globe; and the unique methodological and epistemological tools anthropologists bring to bear on climate research. Part two includes a series of case studies that highlights leading-edge research—including some unexpected and provocative findings. Part three challenges scholars to be proactive on the front lines of climate change, providing instruction on how to work in with research communities, with innovative forms of communication, in higher education, in policy environments, as individuals, and in other critical arenas. Linking sophisticated knowledge to effective actions, Anthropology and Climate Change is essential for students and scholars in anthropology and environmental studies.

Anthropology and Climate Change

Author: Susan Alexandra Crate
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781629580012
Format: PDF, Kindle
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The second edition of the groundbreaking Anthropology and Climate Change presents new foundational chapters, new case studies, and revised and updated contributions from major scholars to examine what we have learned about climate change and what we should do about it.

Climate Cultures

Author: Jessica Barnes
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300198817
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Climate change is one of the most pressing issues of our times, yet global solutions have proved elusive. This book draws together cutting-edge anthropological research to uncover new ways of approaching the critical questions that surround climate change. Leading anthropologists engage in three major areas of inquiry: how climate change issues have been framed in previous times compared to present-day discourse, how knowledge about climate change and its impacts is produced and interpreted by different groups, and how imagination plays a role in shaping conceptions of climate change.

Why We Disagree about Climate Change

Author: Mike Hulme
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107268893
Format: PDF, ePub
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Climate change is not 'a problem' waiting for 'a solution'. It is an environmental, cultural and political phenomenon which is re-shaping the way we think about ourselves, our societies and humanity's place on Earth. Drawing upon twenty-five years of professional work as an international climate change scientist and public commentator, Mike Hulme provides a unique insider's account of the emergence of this phenomenon and the diverse ways in which it is understood. He uses different standpoints from science, economics, faith, psychology, communication, sociology, politics and development to explain why we disagree about climate change. In this way he shows that climate change, far from being simply an 'issue' or a 'threat', can act as a catalyst to revise our perception of our place in the world. Why We Disagree About Climate Change is an important contribution to the ongoing debate over climate change and its likely impact on our lives.

The Anthropology of Climate Change

Author: Michael R. Dove
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1118605950
Format: PDF, Mobi
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This timely anthology brings together for the first time the most important ancient, medieval, Enlightenment, and modern scholarship for a complete anthropological evaluation of the relationship between culture and climate change. Brings together for the first time the most important classical works and contemporary scholarship for a complete historical anthropological evaluation of the relationship between culture and climate change Covers the historic and prehistoric records of human impact from and response to prior periods of climate change, including the impact and response to climate change at the local level Discusses the impact on global debates about climate change from North-South post-colonial histories and the social dimensions of the science of climate change. Includes coverage of topics such as environmental determinism, climatic events as social catalysts, climatic disasters and societal collapse, and ethno-meteorology An ideal text for courses in climate change, human/cultural ecology, environmental anthropology and archaeology, disaster studies, environmental sciences, science and technology studies, history of science, and conservation and development studies

Fierce Climate Sacred Ground

Author: Elizabeth Marino
Publisher: University of Alaska Press
ISBN: 1602232660
Format: PDF, Docs
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As issues of climate change continue to challenge the planet, some populations are more at risk than others. In this unique ethnographic take on climate change, Elizabeth Marino examines how disasters and the outcomes of climate change often fall heaviest on those already burdened with other social risks and often to communities who have contributed least to the problem. She takes as her subject the low-lying village of Shishmaref, Alaska, a place she s lived in or visited since 2002. The risk to Shishmaref is complex: warmer temperatures means less protective winter ice, melting permafrost speeds erosion, and animal migrations are disturbed. While the physical dangers challenge lives, the stress and uncertainty challenge culture and identity. Marino argues that the victims of climate change are not random but instead are determined by historically constructed colonial processes. In "Fierce Climate, Sacred Ground," Marino brings Shishmaref into focus as a place where people in a close-knit, determined community deal with the challenges facing them and considers what s at stake in confronting climate change."

Sacred Ecology

Author: Fikret Berkes
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1351628291
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Sacred Ecology examines bodies of knowledge held by indigenous and other rural peoples around the world, and asks how we can learn from this knowledge and ways of knowing. Berkes explores the importance of local and indigenous knowledge as a complement to scientific ecology, and its cultural and political significance for indigenous groups themselves. With updates of relevant links for further learning and over 180 new references, the fourth edition gives increased voice to indigenous authors, and reflects the remarkable increase in published local observations of climate change.

Climate Culture Change

Author: Timothy B. Leduc
Publisher: University of Ottawa Press
ISBN: 0776607502
Format: PDF
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Every passing day brings new headlines about climate change as politicians debate how to respond, scientists offer new revelations and sceptics critique the validity of the research. In Climate, Culture, Change, these many political, economic and scientific uncertainties that today inundate our collective consciousness are analyzed in a way that reveals the cultural scope of the challenge. This alternative view to the still dominant scientific and political economic discourses is clarified by focusing on the climate changes currently occurring in the Canadian north, and the challenges they are posing to both Western climate research and Inuit knowledge or Inuit Qaujimatugangit. Through various dialogues, the book contemplates the value of an intercultural response to the current northern and global climate threat.

Cruel Attachments

Author: John Borneman
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022623407X
Format: PDF, Mobi
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There is no more seemingly incorrigible criminal type than the child sex offender. Said to suffer from a deeply rooted paraphilia, he is often considered as outside the moral limits of the human, profoundly resistant to change. Despite these assessments, in much of the West an increasing focus on rehabilitation through therapy provides hope that psychological transformation is possible. Examining the experiences of child sex offenders undergoing therapy in Germany—where such treatments are both a legal right and duty—John Borneman, in Cruel Attachments, offers a fine-grained account of rehabilitation for this reviled criminal type. Carefully exploring different cases of the attempt to rehabilitate child sex offenders, Borneman details a secular ritual process aimed not only at preventing future acts of molestation but also at fundamentally transforming the offender, who is ultimately charged with creating an almost entirely new self. Acknowledging the powerful repulsion felt by a public that is often extremely skeptical about the success of rehabilitation, he challenges readers to confront the contemporary contexts and conundrums that lie at the heart of regulating intimacy between children and adults.

An Anthropology of Biomedicine

Author: Margaret Lock
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1119069130
Format: PDF, Mobi
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"Edition History: Margaret Lock and Vinh-Kim Nguyen (1e, 2010) published by Blackwell Ltd."--T.p. verso.