Libyan Sugar

Author: Michael Christopher Brown
Publisher: Twin Palms Pub
ISBN: 9781936611096
Format: PDF, Mobi
Download Now
Centered around the 2011 Libyan Revolution, Libyan Sugar is a road trip through a war zone, detailed through photographs, journal entries, and written communication with family and colleagues. A record of Michael Christopher Brown's life both inside and outside Libya during that year, the work is about a young man going to war for the first time and his experience of that age-old desire to get as close as possible to a conflict in order to discover something about war and something about himself, perhaps a certain definition of life and death.

Aperture Conversations

Author: Melissa Harris
Publisher: Aperture
ISBN: 9781597113069
Format: PDF, ePub
Download Now
Why did Henri Cartier-Bresson nearly have a posthumous exhibition while still alive? What led Stephen Shore to work with color? Why was Sophie Calle accused of stealing Vermeer's The Concert? And what is Susan Meiselas's take on Instagram and the future of online storytelling? Aperture Conversations presents a selection of interviews highlighting critical dialogue between photographers, esteemed critics, curators, editors, and artists from 1985 to the present day. Emerging talent along with well-established photographers discuss their work openly and examine the future of the medium. Drawn primarily from Aperture magazine with selections from Aperture's booklist and online platform, Aperture Conversations celebrates the artist's voice, collaborations, and the photography community at large.

The Rise

Author: Sarah Lewis
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1451629257
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Download Now
From celebrated art historian, curator, and teacher Sarah Lewis, a fascinating examination of how our most iconic creative endeavors—from innovation to the arts—are not achievements but conversions, corrections after failed attempts. The gift of failure is a riddle: it will always be both the void and the start of infinite possibility. The Rise—part investigation into a psychological mystery, part an argument about creativity and art, and part a soulful celebration of the determination and courage of the human spirit—makes the case that many of the world’s greatest achievements have come from understanding the central importance of failure. Written over the course of four years, this exquisite biography of an idea is about the improbable foundations of a creative human endeavor. Each chapter focuses on the inestimable value of often ignored ideas—the power of surrender, how play is essential for innovation, the “near win” can help propel you on the road to mastery, the importance of grit and creative practice. The Rise shares narratives about figures past and present that range from choreographers, writers, painters, inventors, and entrepreneurs; Frederick Douglass, Samuel F.B. Morse, Diane Arbus, and J.K. Rowling, for example, feature alongside choreographer Paul Taylor, Nobel Prize–winning physicists Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov, and Arctic explorer Ben Saunders. With valuable lessons for pedagogy and parenting, for innovation and discovery, and for self-direction and creativity, The Rise “gives the old chestnut ‘If at first you don’t succeed…’ a jolt of adrenaline” (Elle).

Clark

Author: Edmund Clark
Publisher: Aperture
ISBN: 9781597113519
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download Now
British photographer Edmund Clark and counterterrorism investigator Crofton Black have assembled photographs and documents that confront the nature of contemporary warfare and the invisible mechanisms of state control. From George W. Bush's 2001 declaration of the "war on terror" until 2008, an unknown number of people disappeared into a network of secret prisons organized by the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency--transfers without legal process known as extraordinary renditions. No public records were kept as detainees were shuttled all over the globe. Some were eventually sent to Guantánamo Bay or released without charge, while others remain unaccounted for. The paper trail assembled in this volume shows these activities via the weak points of business accountability: invoices, documents of incorporation, and billing reconciliations produced by the small-town American businesses enlisted in detainee transportation. Clark has traveled worldwide to photograph former detention sites, detainees' homes, and government locations. He and Black recreate the network that links CIA "black sites," and evoke ideas of opacity, surface, and testimony in relation to this process--a system hidden in plain sight. Negative Publicity: Artefacts of Extraordinary Rendition, copublished with the Magnum Foundation, its creation supported by Magnum Foundation's Emergency Fund, raises fundamental questions about the accountability and complicity of our governments, and the erosion of our most basic civil rights.

Racial Innocence

Author: Robin Bernstein
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814787096
Format: PDF, Docs
Download Now
Beginning in the mid nineteenth century in America, childhood became synonymous with innocenceoa reversal of the previously- dominant Calvinist belief that children were depraved, sinful creatures. As the idea of childhood innocence took hold, it became racialized: popular culture constructed white children as innocent and vulnerable while excluding black youth from these qualities. Actors, writers, and visual artists then began pairing white children with African American adults and children, thus transferring the quality of innocence to a variety of racial-political projectsoa dynamic that Robin Bernstein calls racial innocence. This phenomenon informed racial formation from the mid nineteenth century through the early twentieth, while enabling sharply divergent political agendas to appear, paradoxically, to be innocuous, natural, normal, and therefore justified. Racial Innocence takes up a rich archive including books, toys, theatrical props, and domestic knickknacks which Bernstein analyzes as scriptive things that invite or prompt historically-located practices while allowing for resistance and social improvisation.Integrating performance studies with literary and visual analysis, Bernstein offers singular readings of theatrical productions, literary works, material culture including Topsy pincushions and Raggedy Ann dolls, and visual texts ranging from fine portraiture to advertisements for lard substitute. Throughout, Bernstein shows how innocence gradually became the exclusive province of white childrenountil the Civil Rights Movement succeeded not only in legally desegregating public spaces, but in culturally desegregating the concept of childhood itself.

Pictures and Progress

Author: Maurice O. Wallace
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822350858
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download Now
Featuring more than seventy images, Pictures and Progress brings to light the wide-ranging practices of early African American photographers, as well as the effects of photography on racialized thinking.

Photography and Cinema

Author: David Campany
Publisher: Reaktion Books
ISBN: 9781861893512
Format: PDF, ePub
Download Now
This account of photography and cinema shows how the two media are not separate but in fact have influenced each other since their inception. David Campany explores photographers on screen, photographic and filmic stillness, photographs in film, the influence of photography on cinema, and the photographer as a filmmaker.