Archaeologies of Slavery and Freedom in the Caribbean

Author: Lynsey A. Bates
Publisher: Florida Museum of Natural Hist
ISBN: 9781683400554
Format: PDF
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While the patterns of habitation and development are similar throughout the Caribbean, there was also a great deal of diversity. The authors in this volume use innovative techniques and perspectives to reveal the stories of places and times where the usual rules did not always apply.

Creole Transformation from Slavery to Freedom

Author: Douglas V. Armstrong
Publisher: University Press of Florida
ISBN: 0813031818
Format: PDF, ePub
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OC With the first study to address the development of a free, mixed-race Caribbean community using historical and archaeological evidence, Armstrong has provided a new direction for research and challenged accepted notions of Caribbean family structure."

International Handbook of Historical Archaeology

Author: Teresita Majewski
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9780387720715
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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In studying the past, archaeologists have focused on the material remains of our ancestors. Prehistorians generally have only artifacts to study and rely on the diverse material record for their understanding of past societies and their behavior. Those involved in studying historically documented cultures not only have extensive material remains but also contemporary texts, images, and a range of investigative technologies to enable them to build a broader and more reflexive picture of how past societies, communities, and individuals operated and behaved. Increasingly, historical archaeology refers not to a particular period, place, or a method, but rather an approach that interrogates the tensions between artifacts and texts irrespective of context. In short, historical archaeology provides direct evidence for how humans have shaped the world we live in today. Historical archaeology is a branch of global archaeology that has grown in the last 40 years from its North American base into an increasingly global community of archaeologists each studying their area of the world in a historical context. Where historical archaeology started as part of the study of the post-Columbian societies of the United States and Canada, it has now expanded to interface with the post-medieval archaeologies of Europe and the diverse post-imperial experiences of Africa, Latin America, and Australasia. The 36 essays in the International Handbook of Historical Archaeology have been specially commissioned from the leading researchers in their fields, creating a wide-ranging digest of the increasingly global field of historical archaeology. The volume is divided into two sections, the first reviewing the key themes, issues, and approaches of historical archaeology today, and the second containing a series of case studies charting the development and current state of historical archaeological practice around the world. This key reference work captures the energy and diversity of this global discipline today.

The Archaeology of Slavery

Author: Lydia Wilson Marshall
Publisher: SIU Press
ISBN: 080933397X
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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The Archaeology of Slavery grapples with both the benefits and complications of a comparative approach to the archaeology of slavery. Contributors from different archaeological subfields, including American, African, prehistoric, and historical, consider how to define slavery, identify it in the archaeological record, and study slavery as a diachronic process that covers enslavement to emancipation and beyond. Themes include how to define slavery, how to identify slavery archaeologically, enslavement and emancipation, and the politics and ethics of slavery-related research.

The Oxford Handbook of Caribbean Archaeology

Author: William F. Keegan
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199875073
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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The Oxford Handbook of Caribbean Archaeology provides an overview of archaeological investigations in the insular Caribbean, understood here as the islands whose shores surround the Caribbean Sea and the islands of the Bahama Archipelago. Though these islands were never isolated from the surrounding mainland, their histories are sufficiently diverse to warrant their identification as distinct areas of culture. Over the past 20 years, Caribbean archaeology has been transformed from a focus on reconstructing culture histories to one on the mobility and exchange expressed in cultural and social dynamics. This Handbook brings together, for the first time, examples of the best research conducted by scholars from across the globe to address the complexity of the Caribbean past. The Handbook is divided into five sections. Part I, Islands of History and the Precolonial History of the Caribbean Islands, provides an introduction to Caribbean Archaeology and its history. The papers in the following Ethnohistory section address the diversity of cultural practices expressed in the insular Caribbean and develop historical descriptions in concert with archaeological evidence in order to place language, social organization, and the native Ta?nos and Island Caribs in perspective. The following section, Culture History, provides the latest research on specific geographical locations and cross-cultural engagements, from Jamaica and the Bahama archigelago to the Saladoid and the Isthmo-Antillean Engagements. Creating History, the fourth section, includes papers on specific issues related to the field, such as Zooarchaeology, Rock Art, and DNA analysis, among others. The final section, World History, centers on the consequences of European colonization.

The Colonial Caribbean

Author: James A. Delle
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139952110
Format: PDF, Mobi
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The Colonial Caribbean is an archaeological analysis of the Jamaican plantation system at the turn of the nineteenth century. Focused specifically on coffee plantation landscapes and framed by Marxist theory, the analysis considers plantation landscapes using a multiscalar approach to landscape archaeology. James A. Delle considers spatial phenomena ranging from the diachronic settlement pattern of the island as a whole to the organization of individual house and yard areas located within the villages of enslaved workers. Delle argues that a Marxist approach to landscape archaeology provides a powerful theoretical framework to understand how the built environment played a direct role in the negotiation of social relations in the colonial Caribbean.

The Peoples of the Caribbean

Author: Nicholas J. Saunders
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 1576077012
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Offers a comprehensive guide to the archaeology and traditional culture of the Caribbean.

Slavery Behind the Wall

Author: Theresa A. Singleton
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780813054117
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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A significant contribution in Caribbean archaeology. Singleton weaves archaeological and documentary evidence into a compelling narrative of the lives of the enslaved at Santa Ana de Biajacas. Patricia Samford, author of "Subfloor Pits and the Archaeology of Slavery in Colonial Virginia" Presents results of the first historical archaeology in Cuba by an American archaeologist since the 1950s revolution. Singleton s extensive historical research provides rich context for this and future archaeological investigations, and the entire body of her pioneering research provides comparative material for other studies of African American life and institutional slavery in the Caribbean and the Americas. Leland Ferguson, author of "God s Fields: Landscape, Religion, and Race in Moravian Wachovia" Singleton s enlightening findings on plantation slavery life will undoubtedly constitute a reference point for future studies on Afro-Cuban archaeology. Manuel Barcia, author of "The Great African Slave Revolt of 1825: Cuba and the Fight for Freedom in Matanzas " Cuba had the largest slave society of the Spanish colonial empire. At Santa Ana de Biajacas the plantation owner sequestered slaves behind a massive masonry wall. In the first archaeological investigation of a Cuban plantation by an English speaker, Theresa Singleton explores how elite Cuban planters used the built environment to impose a hierarchical social order upon slave laborers. Behind the wall, slaves reclaimed the space as their own, forming communities, building their own houses, celebrating, gambling, and even harboring slave runaways. What emerged there is not just an identity distinct from other North American and Caribbean plantations, but a unique slave culture that thrived despite a spartan lifestyle. Singleton s study provides insight into the larger historical context of the African diaspora, global patterns of enslavement, and the development of Cuba as an integral member of the larger Atlantic World. A volume in the series Cultural Heritage Studies, edited by Paul Shackel "