Archaeologies of Slavery and Freedom in the Caribbean

Author: Lynsey A. Bates
Publisher: Florida Museum of Natural Hist
ISBN: 9781683400554
Format: PDF, Mobi
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While the patterns of habitation and development are similar throughout the Caribbean, there was also a great deal of diversity. The authors in this volume use innovative techniques and perspectives to reveal the stories of places and times where the usual rules did not always apply.

Jamaica in Slavery and Freedom

Author: Kathleen E. A. Monteith
Publisher: University of West Indies Press
ISBN: 9789766401085
Format: PDF
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Jamaica's rich history has been the subject of many books, articles and papers. This collection of 18 original essays considers aspects of Jamaican history not covered in more general histories of the island and illuminates developments in Jamaican and West Indian history. The collection emphasises the relevance of history to everyday life and the development of a national identity, culture and economy. The essays are organized in three sections: historiography and sources; society, culture and heritage; and economy, labour and politics.

Creole Transformation from Slavery to Freedom

Author: Douglas V. Armstrong
Publisher: University Press of Florida
ISBN: 0813031818
Format: PDF, Mobi
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OC With the first study to address the development of a free, mixed-race Caribbean community using historical and archaeological evidence, Armstrong has provided a new direction for research and challenged accepted notions of Caribbean family structure."

Out of Many One People

Author: James A. Delle
Publisher: University of Alabama Press
ISBN: 0817356487
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Scholars present archaeological findings to paint a complex and fascinating picture of life in colonial Jamaica. Simultaneous.

International Handbook of Historical Archaeology

Author: Teresita Majewski
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9780387720715
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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In studying the past, archaeologists have focused on the material remains of our ancestors. Prehistorians generally have only artifacts to study and rely on the diverse material record for their understanding of past societies and their behavior. Those involved in studying historically documented cultures not only have extensive material remains but also contemporary texts, images, and a range of investigative technologies to enable them to build a broader and more reflexive picture of how past societies, communities, and individuals operated and behaved. Increasingly, historical archaeology refers not to a particular period, place, or a method, but rather an approach that interrogates the tensions between artifacts and texts irrespective of context. In short, historical archaeology provides direct evidence for how humans have shaped the world we live in today. Historical archaeology is a branch of global archaeology that has grown in the last 40 years from its North American base into an increasingly global community of archaeologists each studying their area of the world in a historical context. Where historical archaeology started as part of the study of the post-Columbian societies of the United States and Canada, it has now expanded to interface with the post-medieval archaeologies of Europe and the diverse post-imperial experiences of Africa, Latin America, and Australasia. The 36 essays in the International Handbook of Historical Archaeology have been specially commissioned from the leading researchers in their fields, creating a wide-ranging digest of the increasingly global field of historical archaeology. The volume is divided into two sections, the first reviewing the key themes, issues, and approaches of historical archaeology today, and the second containing a series of case studies charting the development and current state of historical archaeological practice around the world. This key reference work captures the energy and diversity of this global discipline today.

Slavery Behind the Wall

Author: Theresa A. Singleton
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780813054117
Format: PDF, Kindle
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A significant contribution in Caribbean archaeology. Singleton weaves archaeological and documentary evidence into a compelling narrative of the lives of the enslaved at Santa Ana de Biajacas. Patricia Samford, author of "Subfloor Pits and the Archaeology of Slavery in Colonial Virginia" Presents results of the first historical archaeology in Cuba by an American archaeologist since the 1950s revolution. Singleton s extensive historical research provides rich context for this and future archaeological investigations, and the entire body of her pioneering research provides comparative material for other studies of African American life and institutional slavery in the Caribbean and the Americas. Leland Ferguson, author of "God s Fields: Landscape, Religion, and Race in Moravian Wachovia" Singleton s enlightening findings on plantation slavery life will undoubtedly constitute a reference point for future studies on Afro-Cuban archaeology. Manuel Barcia, author of "The Great African Slave Revolt of 1825: Cuba and the Fight for Freedom in Matanzas " Cuba had the largest slave society of the Spanish colonial empire. At Santa Ana de Biajacas the plantation owner sequestered slaves behind a massive masonry wall. In the first archaeological investigation of a Cuban plantation by an English speaker, Theresa Singleton explores how elite Cuban planters used the built environment to impose a hierarchical social order upon slave laborers. Behind the wall, slaves reclaimed the space as their own, forming communities, building their own houses, celebrating, gambling, and even harboring slave runaways. What emerged there is not just an identity distinct from other North American and Caribbean plantations, but a unique slave culture that thrived despite a spartan lifestyle. Singleton s study provides insight into the larger historical context of the African diaspora, global patterns of enslavement, and the development of Cuba as an integral member of the larger Atlantic World. A volume in the series Cultural Heritage Studies, edited by Paul Shackel "

Sugar Slavery and Freedom in Nineteenth Century Puerto Rico

Author: Luis A. Figueroa
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 9780807876831
Format: PDF, ePub
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The contributions of the black population to the history and economic development of Puerto Rico have long been distorted and underplayed, Luis A. Figueroa contends. Focusing on the southeastern coastal region of Guayama, one of Puerto Rico's three leading centers of sugarcane agriculture, Figueroa examines the transition from slavery and slave labor to freedom and free labor after the 1873 abolition of slavery in colonial Puerto Rico. He corrects misconceptions about how ex-slaves went about building their lives and livelihoods after emancipation and debunks standing myths about race relations in Puerto Rico. Historians have assumed that after emancipation in Puerto Rico, as in other parts of the Caribbean and the U.S. South, former slaves acquired some land of their own and became subsistence farmers. Figueroa finds that in Puerto Rico, however, this was not an option because both capital and land available for sale to the Afro-Puerto Rican population were scarce. Paying particular attention to class, gender, and race, his account of how these libertos joined the labor market profoundly revises our understanding of the emancipation process and the evolution of the working class in Puerto Rico.