Archaeology of the War of 1812

Author: Michael T Lucas
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1315433672
Format: PDF
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This is the first summary of archaeological contributions to our understanding of the War of 1812, published as the war commemorates its 200th anniversary. The contributors of original papers discuss recent excavations and field surveys that present an archaeological perspective that enriches-- and often conflicts with—received historical narratives. The studies cover fortifications, encampments, landscapes, shipwrecks, and battles in the midwestern, southern, mid-Atlantic, and northeastern regions of the United States and in Canada. In addition to archaeologists, this volume will appeal to military history specialists and other historians.

Coffins of the Brave

Author: Kevin J. Crisman
Publisher: Texas A&M University Press
ISBN: 1623490766
Format: PDF, Kindle
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In Coffins of the Brave: Lake Shipwrecks of the War of 1812, archaeologist Kevin J. Crisman and his fellow contributors examine sixteen different examples of 1812-era naval and commercial shipbuilding. They range from four small prewar vessels to four 16- or 20-gun brigs, three warships of much greater size, a steamboat hull converted into an armed schooner, two gunboats, and two postwar schooners. Despite their differing degrees of preservation and archaeological study, each vessel reveals something about how its creators sought the best balance of strength, durability, capacity, stability, speed, weatherliness, and seaworthiness for the anticipated naval struggle on the lakes along the US-Canadian border. The underwater archaeology reported here has guided a new approach to understanding the events of 1812–15, one that blends the evidence in contemporary documents and images with a wealth of details derived from objects lost, discarded, and otherwise left behind. This heavily illustrated volume balances scholarly findings with lively writing, interjecting the adventure of working on shipwrecks and archaeological finds into the investigation and interpretation of a war that continues to attract interest two centuries after it was fought.

A Fully Accredited Ocean

Author: Victoria Brehm
Publisher: University of Michigan Press
ISBN: 9780472107094
Format: PDF, Kindle
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What was daily life like for a sailor in the War of 1812? How was his ship constructed? What allowed some shipping companies to survive in the harsh world of early unrestrained competition on the Great Lakes while many others failed? What sorts of stories did common sailors write about sailing the lakes? Such questions form the basis of this multifaceted collection of essays, "A Fully Accredited Ocean, " edited by Victoria Brehm. The issues presented here address the fundamentals of existence of life on the lakes for a period of nearly two centuries. These essays bring to light some of the massive disruptions that affected the Great Lakes region as it became one of the most industrialized areas on the continent. The essayists explore the culture of the lakes through the archaeological investigation of the War of 1812 brig Jefferson, women on the lakes, fishing crafts of Isle Royale, and through personal narrative that touches on the competing concerns of occupational fishers, sports enthusiasts, lake biologists, and the state. Victoria Brehm is Assistant Professor of English, Grand Valley State University, Allendale, Michigan.

Death at Snake Hill

Author: Paul Litt
Publisher: Dundurn
ISBN: 1550021869
Format: PDF
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A revealing parable of the conflicts that arise when pressures for land development collide with heritage conservation.

Huts and History

Author: Clarence R. Geier
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780813029412
Format: PDF, Kindle
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The American Civil War soldier, confined much of the time to his camp, suffered from boredom and sickness. Encampment was not only tedious but detrimental to his health; far more soldiers died of diseases from sharing close quarters with their comrades than from wounds on the battlefield. Until now, archaeologists have concentrated their study on the battle sites and overlooked the importance of the camps. This edited collection is the first dedicated to the archaeology of Civil War encampments. The authors contend that intensive study to interpret and preserve these sites will help to ensure their protection as well as expand our understanding of the 19th-century soldier's life. Whether they mobilized tens of thousands of men for training or taught maneuvers to smaller groups, encampments are significant in several ways: as "cultural landscapes" characterized by architectural features, as socially and politically organized "mobile communities," and as infrastructures created to support soldiers' needs. The authors' techniques can be applied to camps not only of the Civil War but the French and Indian War, the American Revolution, the War of 1812, the Mexican War, and the Indian campaign.

The War of 1812

Author: Donald R. Hickey
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 0252078373
Format: PDF, ePub
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This comprehensive and authoritative history of the War of 1812, thoroughly revised for the 200th anniversary of the historic conflict, is a myth-shattering study that will inform and entertain students, historians, and general readers alike. Donald R. Hickey explores the military, diplomatic, and domestic history of America's second war with Great Britain, bringing the study up to date with recent scholarship on all aspects of the war, from the Gulf of Mexico to Canada. With additional information on the British forces, American Indians, and military operations The War of 1812: A Forgotten Conflict, Bicentennial Edition explains how the war promoted American nationalism and manifest destiny, stimulated peacetime defence spending, and enhanced America's reputation abroad. Hickey also shows that the war sparked bloody conflicts between pro-war Republican and anti-war Federalist neighbours and solidified the United States' antipathy toward the British. Donald R. Hickey is a professor of history at Wayne State College in Wayne, Nebraska. He is the author of seven books, including Don't Give Up the Ship! Myths of the War of 1812, and numerous articles on the early republic.

Making Senses of the Past

Author: Jo Day
Publisher: SIU Press
ISBN: 0809332876
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Since the nineteenth century, museums have kept their artifacts in glass cases to better preserve them. This practice has led to an archaeology dominated by visual descriptions of relics, even though human interaction with the surrounding world involves the whole body and all of its senses. In the past few years, sensory archaeology has become more prominent, and Making Senses of the Past is one of the first collected volumes of its kind on this subject. The essays in this volume take readers on a multisensory journey around the world and across time, explore alternative ways to perceive past societies, and offer a new way of writing archaeology that incorporates each of the five senses.

The Routledge Handbook of the War of 1812

Author: Donald R. Hickey
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317701976
Format: PDF, Mobi
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The War of 1812 ranged over a remarkably large territory, as the fledgling United States battled Great Britain at sea and on land across what is now the eastern half of the U.S. and Canada. Native people and the Spanish were also involved in the war’s interrelated conflicts. Often overlooked, the War of 1812 has been the subject of an explosion of new research over the past twenty-five years. The Routledge Handbook of the War of 1812 brings together the insights of this research through an array of fresh essays by leading scholars in the field, offering an overview of current understandings of the war that will be a vital reference for students and researchers alike. The essays in this volume examine a wide range of military, political, social, and cultural dimensions of the war. With full consideration given to American, Canadian, British, and native viewpoints, the international group of contributors place the war in national and international context, chart the course of events in its different theaters, consider the war’s legacy and commemoration, and examine the roles of women, African Americans, and natives. Capturing the state of the field in a single volume, this handbook is a must-have resource for anyone with an interest in early America.

Tohopeka

Author: Kathryn E. Holland Braund
Publisher: Pebble Hill Books
ISBN: 9780817357115
Format: PDF, ePub
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Tohopeka contains a variety of perspectives and uses a wide array of evidence and approaches, from scrutiny of cultural and religious practices to literary and linguistic analysis, to illuminate this troubled period. Almost two hundred years ago, the territory that would become Alabama was both ancient homeland and new frontier where a complex network of allegiances and agendas was playing out. The fabric of that network stretched and frayed as the Creek Civil War of 1813-14 pitted a faction of the Creek nation known as Red Sticks against those Creeks who supported the Creek National Council. The war began in July 1813, when Red Stick rebels were attacked near Burnt Corn Creek by Mississippi militia and settlers from the Tensaw area in a vain attempt to keep the Red Sticks’ ammunition from reaching the main body of disaffected warriors. A retaliatory strike against a fortified settlement owned by Samuel Mims, now called Fort Mims, was a Red Stick victory. The brutality of the assault, in which 250 people were killed, outraged the American public and “Remember Fort Mims” became a national rallying cry. During the American-British War of 1812, Americans quickly joined the war against the Red Sticks, turning the civil war into a military campaign designed to destroy Creek power. The battles of the Red Sticks have become part of Alabama and American legend and include the famous Canoe Fight, the Battle of Holy Ground, and most significantly, the Battle of Tohopeka (also known as Horseshoe Bend)—the final great battle of the war. There, an American army crushed Creek resistance and made a national hero of Andrew Jackson. New attention to material culture and documentary and archaeological records fills in details, adds new information, and helps disabuse the reader of outdated interpretations. Contributors Susan M. Abram / Kathryn E. Holland Braund/Robert P. Collins / Gregory Evans Dowd / John E. Grenier / David S. Heidler / Jeanne T. Heidler / Ted Isham / Ove Jensen / Jay Lamar / Tom Kanon / Marianne Mills / James W. Parker / Craig T. Sheldon Jr. / Robert G. Thrower / Gregory A. Waselkov