Arduino Projects to Save the World

Author: Emery Premeaux
Publisher: Apress
ISBN: 1430236248
Format: PDF, ePub
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Arduino Projects to Save the World shows that it takes little more than a few tools, a few wires and sensors, an Arduino board, and a bit of gumption to build devices that lower energy bills, help you grow our own food, monitor pollution in the air and in the ground, even warn you about earth tremors. Arduino Projects to Save the World introduces the types of sensors needed to collect environmental data—from temperature sensors to motion sensors. You'll see projects that deal with energy sources—from building your own power strip to running your Arduino board on solar panels so you can actually proceed to build systems that help, for example, to lower your energy bills. Once you have some data, it's time to put it to good use by publishing it online as you collect it; this book shows you how. The core of this book deals with the Arduino projects themselves: Account for heat loss using a heat loss temperature sensor array that sends probes into every corner of your house for maximum measurement. Monitor local seismic activity with your own seismic monitor. Keep your Arduino devices alive in the field with a solar powered device that uses a smart, power-saving design. Monitor your data and devices with a wireless radio device; place your sensors where you like without worrying about wires. Keep an eye on your power consumption with a sophisticated power monitor that records its data wherever you like. Arduino Projects to Save the World teaches the aspiring green systems expert to build environmentally-sound, home-based Arduino devices. Saving the world, one Arduino at a time. Please note: the print version of this title is black & white; the eBook is full color.

Arduino Projects to Save the World Premeaux Evans 2011

Author: Technology in Action (TIA)
Publisher: Bukupedia
ISBN:
Format: PDF
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Preface In the year following the Tohoku earthquake and tsunami, I have been fortunate enough to be able to work alongside some incredible people in the open source community, doing extraordinary things. By now I am sure you are all well aware that the tsunami caused severe damage to the Fukushima daiichi (number 1) power plant. When the backup generators were swamped by the waves, the reactors began melting down. Almost overnight, the cost of Geiger counters and Geiger-muller tubes skyrocketed. The price hike was not limited to Japan. A lack of ready supplies of Geiger counters caused a global price shock. The Japanese government began radiation tests almost as quickly as the news pundits started making comparisons to Three Mile Island and Chernobyl. It quickly became apparent to the hacker community that a few spot measurements taken outside government office buildings once a week were not going to cut it. Not that the Japanese government failed to step in and do its job, but until now the standard practices within the nuclear energy industry were limited to stationary sensors and limited readings. Essentially, the book would have to be rewritten. Only a few days after the quake, a few Tokyo HackerSpace members braved the dangers and ventured out to the space to have our usual meeting. Right away we began brainstorming ideas as to how we could help, by applying our technical skills to the current disasters (it was in fact multiple disasters). We got to work on solar-powered cell phone chargers, international pleas for donations and supplies, and coordinating with volunteers to provide crash space, food, and equipment for their trips up north. In the first week, radiation was definately at the top of everyone’s list. About that time, Pieter Franken made contact with a group of people in the U.S., willing to set up and host a data server for collecting radiation data. In the beginning they could only aggregate all the independent sensors registered on sites such as Patchube, as well as independent servers. Even so, they quickly developed a radiation map far more sophisticated than anything the government could come up with. The advantage was many distributed sensors maintained by enthusiasts, willing to spend a bit of money and sweat to do it. Once the Peter Franken-to-SafeCast-to-Tokyo-HackerSpace connection was made, the project exploded in scope. Akiba, one of our star members in the field of wireless sensor networks, quickly mashed up a portable Geiger counter system that logged readings to an SD card every 5 seconds. It does not sound like an amazing feat, but you must keep in mind that up till this point, the best the universities and government could come up with was to send ten people into an area. They each carried a Geiger counter, GPS receiver, camera, marking stick, and a clipboard. They were literally writing down GPS coordinates and timestamps on pieces of paper before jotting down the Geiger reading! Terribly inefficient to say the least. Pieter got hold of the prototype, added his own touches to it, and the bGeigi was born. The bGeigi (or bento geigi; literally “lunchbox Geiger counter”) contains an off-the-shelf, professionally calibrated Geiger counter connected to a wireless Arduino board. The Arduino reads the counts, reads a GPS receiver, and logs all the data to a memory card. In addition, it transmits the Geiger reading to a remote receiver. www.it-ebooks.info ■ PREFACE xvii The concept works like this: The bGeigi is mounted to a car, bus, or bicycle. It is battery powered and takes readings continuously every 5 seconds for up to 12 hours. You simply drive around, taking readings everywhere you go! By now, the SafeCast team has over a million readings throughout northern Japan. One volunteer has vowed to get readings on every street in his town. Even in the early days of the SafeCast project, the resultant data maps were very telling and quite interesting to see evolve. Now that they have more than a million data points, you start to see the radiation cloud effect. As more data comes in, the true fallout pattern becomes more apparent. It’s like assembling a jigsaw puzzle, only without seeing the box cover. So you really don’t know what you will have till it’s done. Each new puzzle piece reveals surprising perspective. The team has not limited themselves to only road data. They make regular stops at homes, office parks, train stations, and other high-traffic areas. In fact, once the first bGeigi was complete, their first order of business was to collect readings in and around every public school in the affected areas. Children were the first priority. Through these field studies they have learned some interesting lessons about how radiation settles in and around a home. Certain materials are more prone to retaining radioactive materials. Areas around drainpipes often contain the highest concentrations (don’t let your pets play or drink in the puddles). A very interesting experiment involved measuring a family’s yard soil before and after an attempt at cleaning up. They shoveled and bagged the first few centemeters of half their yard, then took readings on both areas. The results were significant. The undisturbed soil had readings that were highly disturbing (do a search for SafeCast on YouTube for the shock of a lifetime). The simple act of bagging the top soil had an incredibly positive affect. Unfortunately, other parts of the new home were contaminated in ways that were much more difficult to clean up, and the family felt their best option was to move. The SafeCast model is the best example of citizen data in action. Individuals came together, applied open source thinking and tools to a national problem, and arrived at a solution that far outperformed the hertofore existing solutions. Their open and public data was at first debated and downplayed by some members of the scientific community, only to be fully backed by Keiyo University (one of the top three universities in Japan). This “unorganized,” “scientifically questionable,” non-corporate, all-volunteer organization is currently deploying the largest radiation network in Japan. Until recently, funding was entirely private donations. With the backing of Keiyo and a few corporations that shall remain nameless, this group of concerned citizens is now providing reliable and consistant data to the scientific community and the public. Eventually the government adopted a similar solution of high data rate mobile automated logging. Imitation is the best form of flattery. All of our current models and understanding of the environment are based on a limited data set. We make grand predictions based on isolated sensors taking readings once a day. Our models can only get more accurate as we exponentially increase the number of sensors out there collecting data. But it is absolutely critical that this data be open. Perhaps more important is that we enable each individual to participate in the collection process. The Arduino is perfectly situated to make this happen. As it becomes more acceptable for normal everyday people to be mobile science stations, smart phones will fill the role of data collector. The next step for the bGeigi? The smart phone iGeigi. Then the world.

Arduino Projects to Save the World

Author: Apress L. P.
Publisher: Apress
ISBN:
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Arduino Projects to Save the World shows that it takes little more than a few tools, a few wires and sensors, an Arduino board, and a bit of gumption to build devices that lower energy bills, help you grow our own food, monitor pollution in the air and in the ground, even warn you about earth tremors. Arduino Projects to Save the World introduces the types of sensors needed to collect environmental data from temperature sensors to motion sensors. You'll see projects that deal with energy sources from building your own power strip to running your Arduino board on solar panels so you can actually proceed to build systems that help, for example, to lower your energy bills. Once you have some data, it's time to put it to good use by publishing it online as you collect it; this book shows you how. The core of this book deals with the Arduino projects themselves: Account for heat loss using a heat loss temperature sensor array that sends probes into every corner of your house for maximum measurement. Monitor local seismic activity with your own seismic monitor. Keep your Arduino devices alive in the field with a solar powered device that uses a smart, power-saving design. Monitor your data and devices with a wireless radio device; place your sensors where you like without worrying about wires. Keep an eye on your power consumption with a sophisticated power monitor that records its data wherever you like. Arduino Projects to Save the World teaches the aspiring green systems expert to build environmentally-sound, home-based Arduino devices. Saving the world, one Arduino at a time. Please note: the print version of this title is black & white; the eBook is full color."

Arduino Workshops

Author: John Boxall
Publisher: dpunkt.verlag
ISBN: 3864913802
Format: PDF, ePub
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Der Arduino ist eine preiswerte und flexible Open-Source-Mikrocontroller- Plattform mit einer nahezu unbegrenzten Palette von Add-ons für die Ein- und Ausgänge - wie Sensoren, Displays, Aktoren und vielem mehr. In "Arduino-Workshops" erfahren Sie, wie diese Add-ons funktionieren und wie man sie in eigene Projekte integriert. Sie starten mit einem Überblick über das Arduino-System und erfahren dann rasch alles über die verschiedenen elektronischen Komponenten und Konzepte. Hands-on-Projekte im ganzen Buch vertiefen das Gelernte Schritt für Schritt und helfen Ihnen, dieses Wissen anzuwenden. Je tiefer Sie in die Materie eindringen, desto komplexer und raffinierter werden die Projekte.

Arduino Kochbuch

Author: Michael Margolis
Publisher: O'Reilly Germany
ISBN: 3868993541
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Mit dem Arduino-Kochbuch, das auf der Version Arduino 1.0 basiert, erhalten Sie ein Füllhorn an Ideen und praktischen Beispielen, was alles mit dem Mikrocontroller gezaubert werden kann. Sie lernen alles über die Arduino-Softwareumgebung, digitale und analoge In- und Outputs, Peripheriegeräte, Motorensteuerung und fortgeschrittenes Arduino-Coding. Egal ob es ein Spielzeug, ein Detektor, ein Roboter oder ein interaktives Kleidungsstück werden soll: Elektronikbegeisterte finden über 200 Rezepte, Projekte und Techniken, um mit dem Arduino zu starten oder bestehende Arduino-Projekt mit neuen Features aufzupimpen.

Arduino f r Dummies

Author: John Nussey
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN:
Format: PDF, ePub
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Vom Hobbybastler zum großen Entwickler und Künstler Sie wollen Ihrer Kreativität mit dem Arduino freien Lauf lassen, brauchen aber noch Hintergrundwissen? John Nussey und Gerhard Franken führen Sie Schritt für Schritt in die Nutzung des Arduino ein: Sie lernen die Komponenten Ihres Arduino–Boards kennen, erfahren, wie Sie die Software installieren und mit dem ersten Sketch LEDs blinken lassen. Nützliche Werkzeuge wie Steckplatine und Multimeter werden vorgestellt, das Wichtigste zur Elektrizität und zum Löten wird erläutert. Komplexere Schaltungen und Projekte können Sie anhand der vorhandenen Beispielsketche gleich umsetzen. Bald steht der Realisierung Ihrer eigenen Ideen nichts mehr im Wege.

Making things talk

Author: Tom Igoe
Publisher: O'Reilly Germany
ISBN: 3868991638
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Es macht Spaß, elektronische Dinge zu bauen, die mit der realen Welt interagieren. Aber so richtig cool wird’s erst, wenn die Dinge anfangen sich untereinander zu unterhalten. Mit 33 leicht nachzubauenden Projekten wird dir in Making Things Talk – Die Welt hören, sehen, fühlen gezeigt, wie du deine Gadgets dazu bringst, mit dir und mit der Umwelt zu kommunizieren. Das Buch ist genau für die geschrieben, die zwar nur wenig technische Erfahrung, dafür aber umso mehr geekige Neugierde mitbringen. Lass Mikrocontroller, PCs, Server und Smartphones miteinander quatschen. Vielleicht willst du deinen Freunden zeigen, wie man das Wetter aus unterschiedlichen Teilen der Welt clever darstellen kann. Vielleicht bist du aber auch eine Künstlerin, die ihren Skulpturen mechanisches Leben einhauchen möchte. In diesem Standardwerk lernst du, wie man Geräte-Netzwerke schafft, die sich Daten teilen und auf Befehle von außen reagieren. Mit ein wenig Elektronikgrundwissen, preiswerten Mikrocontrollern und ein paar Netzwerkmodulen baust du coole Projekte: Blink - Dein allererstes Programm Monski Pong - Steuere ein Computerspiel mit einem flauschigen, pinkfarbenen Stoffäffchen Internet-Luftqualitätsmesser - Bau eine Internet-Messstation für Luftqualität Giftwarnung in der Werkstatt - Verwende ein XBee-Modul, Sensoren und ein Stofftier, um dich vor giftigen Dämpfen warnen zu lassen. Bluetooth GPS - Bau einen batteriebetriebenes GPS-Gerät, das via Bluetooth seinen Standort mitteilt. Tweets mit RFID - Lese einen Twitter-Stream via RFID-Tags.

Arduino

Author: Maik Schmidt
Publisher: dpunkt.verlag
ISBN: 3864916461
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Arduino ist ein Open-Source-Projekt, das sowohl aus Hardware als auch aus Software besteht. Ohne Vorlesungen in Elektrotechnik belegen zu müssen, können Sie erste Ideen mit Arduino in kürzester Zeit umsetzen. Von Anfang an praxisorientiert und ohne graue Theorie führt Sie dieses Buch in die Arduino- Welt ein. Teil 1 »Erste Schritte mit Arduino« vermittelt Ihnen die erforderlichen Grundlagen, um die elf Projekte aus Teil 2 bauen zu können. Zunächst erfahren Sie, wie Sie die IDE verwenden und wie Sie Programme kompilieren und auf den Arduino laden. Schnell beginnen Sie mit dem ersten Projekt - dem Elektrowürfel -, das Ihnen den Umgang mit einfachen Bauteilen wie Leuchtdioden, Tastern und Widerständen zeigt. Danach erlernen Sie den Umgang mit analogen und digitalen Sensoren. Sie verwenden einen Temperatur- und einen Ultraschallsensor, um einen digitalen Zollstock zu bauen. Messergebnisse visualisieren Sie im Webbrowser mit JavaScript, HTML5 und CSS3. Sie können auch mit vorhandener Hardware herumspielen und werden sehen, wie leicht es ist, zum Beispiel den Nunchuk für Nintendo Wii in eigenen Programmen einzusetzen oder eine Infrarotfernbedienung zu konstruieren. Schritt für Schritt erschließen Ihnen die Projekte so alle Möglichkeiten, die sich mit Arduino bieten. Zu jedem Projekt gibt es den vollständigen Programmcode zum Download. Wenn Sie an Elektronik interessiert sind und besonders daran, Ihre eigenen Spielzeuge, Modelle und Ideen umzusetzen, haben Sie das richtige Buch gekauft. Und wenn Sie schon Software entwickelt haben - vorzugsweise in C/C++ oder Java -, bringen Sie die besten Voraussetzungen mit.

Das intelligente Haus Heimautomation mit Arduino und Android und PC

Author: Mike Riley
Publisher: O'Reilly Germany
ISBN: 3868993649
Format: PDF
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In Das intelligente Haus -- Heimautomation mit Arduino, Android und PC führt Sie der Technologie-begeisterte Autor Mike Riley durch eine Reihe von Heimautomations-Projekten – von einer Telefon-App, die Sie informiert, wenn ein Paket vor Ihrer Haustür abgelegt wurde, bis zu einem elektronischen Wachhund, der unerwünschte Besucher fernhält. Geekige Projekte Öffnen Sie Türen mit Ihrem Smartphone. Bauen Sie ein Vogelhäuschen, das sich via Twitter meldet, wenn die Vögel zum Fressen kommen oder das Futter ausgeht. Lassen Sie Ihr Haus sprechen, wenn Sie eine E-Mail erhalten, Besucher kommen und vieles mehr. Spannende Projekte Sie werden lernen, wie Sie Android-Smartphones, Arduinos und eine ganze Reihe von Sensoren, Servos, Programmiersprachen, Web-Frameworks und mobile SDKs einsetzen. Das intelligente Haus -- Heimautomation mit Arduino, Android und PC ist für Smartphone-Programmierer, Webentwickler, Technik-Bastler und alle anderen, die Spaß daran haben, als Heimwerker spannende elektronische Projekte zu verwirklichen. Innovative Projekte Dieses Buch soll Sie inspirieren und Ihnen die notwendigen Fertigkeiten zum Bauen erstaunlicher Automationsprojekte vermitteln, so dass Sie Ihr Haus in das intelligenteste Haus der ganzen Nachbarschaft verwandeln können! Was Sie brauchen Um Das intelligente Haus -- Heimautomation mit Arduino, Android und PC richtig einsetzen zu können, sollte Ihnen die Arduino-Plattform nicht ganz fremd sein und Sie sollten Spaß am Basteln haben. Und natürlich sollten Sie neugierig sein und dazulernen wollen. Auch ein bisschen Erfahrung bei der Anwendungsentwicklung ist nicht verkehrt.

Building Arduino Projects for the Internet of Things

Author: Adeel Javed
Publisher: Apress
ISBN: 1484219406
Format: PDF
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Gain a strong foundation of Arduino-based device development, from which you can go in any direction according to your specific development needs and desires. You'll build Arduino-powered devices for everyday use, and then connect those devices to the Internet. You'll be introduced to the building blocks of IoT, and then deploy those principles to by building a variety of useful projects. Projects in the books gradually introduce the reader to key topics such as internet connectivity with Arduino, common IoT protocols, custom web visualization, and Android apps that receive sensor data on-demand and in realtime. IoT device enthusiasts of all ages will want this book by their side when developing Android-based devices. If you're one of the many who have decided to build your own Arduino-powered devices for IoT applications, then Building Arduino Projects for the Internet of Things is exactly what you need. This book is your single resource--a guidebook for the eager-to-learn Arduino enthusiast--that teaches logically, methodically, and practically how the Arduino works and what you can build with it. Written by a software developer and solution architect who got tired of hunting and gathering various lessons for Arduino development as he taught himself all about the topic. For Arduino enthusiasts, this book not only opens up the world of IoT applications, you will also learn many techniques that likely would not be obvious if not for experience with such a diverse group of applications What You'll Learn Create an Arduino circuit that senses temperature Publish data collected from an Arduino to a server and to an MQTT broker Set up channels in Xively Using Node-RED to define complex flows Publish data visualization in a web app Report motion-sensor data through a mobile app Create a remote control for house lights Set up an app in IBM Bluematrix Who This Book Is For IoT device enthusiasts of all ages will want this book by their side when developing Android-based devices.