The Columbia Guide to Asian American History

Author: Gary Y. Okihiro
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 9780231115100
Format: PDF, ePub
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A comprehensive reference to Asian American history reveals the key events and personalities while also exploring the historical debates that rage around their interpretation.

In Defense of Asian American Studies

Author: Sucheng Chan
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 9780252072536
Format: PDF, ePub
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In Defense of Asian American Studies amounts to tales from the trenches on the origins and evolution of the field of Asian American studies, as told by one of its founders and most highly regarded scholars. With great intellectual energy, critical acumen, and a sly sense of humour, Sucheng Chan discusses her experiences on three campuses within the University of California system where Asian American studies was first developed--in response to vehement student demand--under the rubric of ethnic studies. Chan speaks by turns as an advocate and an administrator striving to secure a place for Asian American studies; as a teacher working to give Asian American students a voice and white students a perspective on race and racism; and as a scholar and researcher still asking her own questions. The essays span three decades, closing with a piece on new challenges that face Asian American studies. Eloquently documenting a field of endeavour in which scholarship and identity define and strengthen each other, this volume combines analysis, personal experience, and practical advice indispensable to those engaged in building and sustaining programs in Asian American studies.

Asian American Women and Gender

Author: Franklin Ng
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 9780815334361
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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First published in 1999. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Handbook of Asian American Health

Author: Grace J. Yoo
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 1461422272
Format: PDF, ePub
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Asian Americans encounter a range of health issues often unknown to the American public, policy makers, researchers and even clinicians. National research often combines Asian Americans into a single category, not taking into account the differences and complexity among Asian ethnic subgroups. The definition of Asian American derives from the U.S. Census Bureau’s definition of Asian, which includes peoples from all the vast territories of the Far East, Southeast Asia and the South Asian Subcontinent. While Census classifications determine demographic measurements that affect equal opportunity programs, the broad rubric “Asian-American” can never describe accurately the more than 50 distinct Asian American subgroups, who together comprise multifaceted diversity across cultural ethnicities, socio-economic status, languages, religions and generations. This volume rectifies that situation by exploring the unique needs and health concerns of particular subgroups within the Asian American community. It consolidates a wide range of knowledge on various health issues impacting Asian Americans while also providing a discussion into the cultural, social, and structural forces impacting morbidity, mortality and quality of life. The volume is designed to advance the understanding of Asian American health by explaining key challenges and identifying emerging trends faced in specific ethnic groups and diseases/illnesses, innovative community-based interventions and the future needed areas of research.

The History and Immigration of Asian Americans

Author: Franklin Ng
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 9780815326908
Format: PDF, Mobi
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This volume traces the modern critical and performance history of this play, one of Shakespeare's most-loved and most-performed comedies. The essay focus on such modern concerns as feminism, deconstruction, textual theory, and queer theory.

The Color of Success

Author: Ellen D. Wu
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400848873
Format: PDF, Mobi
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The Color of Success tells of the astonishing transformation of Asians in the United States from the "yellow peril" to "model minorities"--peoples distinct from the white majority but lauded as well-assimilated, upwardly mobile, and exemplars of traditional family values--in the middle decades of the twentieth century. As Ellen Wu shows, liberals argued for the acceptance of these immigrant communities into the national fold, charging that the failure of America to live in accordance with its democratic ideals endangered the country's aspirations to world leadership. Weaving together myriad perspectives, Wu provides an unprecedented view of racial reform and the contradictions of national belonging in the civil rights era. She highlights the contests for power and authority within Japanese and Chinese America alongside the designs of those external to these populations, including government officials, social scientists, journalists, and others. And she demonstrates that the invention of the model minority took place in multiple arenas, such as battles over zoot suiters leaving wartime internment camps, the juvenile delinquency panic of the 1950s, Hawaii statehood, and the African American freedom movement. Together, these illuminate the impact of foreign relations on the domestic racial order and how the nation accepted Asians as legitimate citizens while continuing to perceive them as indelible outsiders. By charting the emergence of the model minority stereotype, The Color of Success reveals that this far-reaching, politically charged process continues to have profound implications for how Americans understand race, opportunity, and nationhood.