Asphalt and Politics

Author: Thomas L. Karnes
Publisher: McFarland
ISBN: 0786454679
Format: PDF, Kindle
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From animal paths to superhighways, transportation has been the backbone of American expansion and growth. This examination of the interstate highway system in the United States, and the forces that shaped it, includes the introduction of the automobile, the Good Roads Movement, and the Lincoln Highway Association. The book offers an analysis of state and federal road funding, modern road-building options, and the successes and failures of the current highway system. Instructors considering this book for use in a course may request an examination copy here.

Getting Out of the Mud

Author: Martin T. Olliff
Publisher: University of Alabama Press
ISBN: 0817319557
Format: PDF, ePub
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When roads were bad -- Alabamians become wide-awake to good roads -- State highways take the lead -- Peering beyond the state's boundaries: named trails and interstate highways -- Laying the foundation for a modern highway system -- Alabama administers its highway program

Divided Highways

Author: Tom Lewis
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 0801467837
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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In Divided Highways, Tom Lewis offers an encompassing account of highway development in the United States. In the early twentieth century Congress created the Bureau of Public Roads to improve roads and the lives of rural Americans. The Bureau was the forerunner of the Interstate Highway System of 1956, which promoted a technocratic approach to modern road building sometimes at the expense of individual lives, regional characteristics, and the landscape. With thoughtful analysis and engaging prose Lewis charts the development of the Interstate system, including the demographic and economic pressures that influenced its planning and construction and the disputes that pitted individuals and local communities against engineers and federal administrators. This is a story of America's hopes for its future life and the realities of its present condition. It is an engaging history of the people and policies that profoundly transformed the American landscape-and the daily lives of Americans. In this updated edition of Divided Highways, Lewis brings his story of the Interstate system up to date, concluding with Boston's troubled and yet triumphant Big Dig project, the growing antipathy for big federal infrastructure projects, and the uncertain economics of highway projects both present and future.

The Big Roads

Author: Earl Swift
Publisher: HMH
ISBN: 054754913X
Format: PDF, ePub
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Discover the twists and turns of one of America’s great infrastructure projects with this “engrossing history of the creation of the U.S. interstate system” (Los Angeles Times). It’s become a part of the landscape that we take for granted, the site of rumbling eighteen-wheelers and roadside rest stops, a familiar route for commuters and vacationing families. But during the twentieth century, the interstate highway system dramatically changed the face of our nation. These interconnected roads—over 47,000 miles of them—are man-made wonders, economic pipelines, agents of sprawl, uniquely American symbols of escape and freedom, and an unrivaled public works accomplishment. Though officially named after President Dwight D. Eisenhower, this network of roadways has origins that reach all the way back to the World War I era, and The Big Roads—“the first thorough history of the expressway system” (The Washington Post)—tells the full story of how they came to be. From the speed demon who inspired a primitive web of dirt auto trails to the largely forgotten technocrats who planned the system years before Ike reached the White House to the city dwellers who resisted the concrete juggernaut when it bore down on their neighborhoods, this book reveals both the massive scale of this government engineering project, and the individual lives that have been transformed by it. A fast-paced history filled with fascinating detours, “the book is a road geek’s treasure—and everyone who travels the highways ought to know these stories” (Kirkus Reviews).

The River of History

Author: Peter Farrugia
Publisher: University of Calgary Press
ISBN: 1552381609
Format: PDF, Docs
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The articles in this collection are dedicated to the proposition that human beings make history, not just in the sense of being agents of change in the here and now, but in the sense that we interpret, appropriate and make use of the past for our own purposes in the future. Covering topics that range from teaching history, to the concept of property rights and the discipline of history in the television age, these essays will radically alter the notion of how we 'make history'. It will show that we are never fully able to bend history to our will, and that as we attempt to do so, we are often shocked at the turns it takes, despite our best efforts to shape it for future generations.

Diesel Smoke Over Asphalt Ribbons

Author: Jerry Aaron
Publisher: Jerry Aaron
ISBN:
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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This book is an affectionate, detailed look at trucking and truck drivers in Nevada and California who hauled loads over US 40 and the infamous Donner Pass during the 1930s and on, into the day of modern trucking along Interstate 80.

Roads Were Not Built for Cars

Author: Carlton Reid
Publisher: Island Press
ISBN: 1610916891
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Cyclists were written out of highway history in the 1920s and 1930s by the all-powerful motor lobby:Roads Were Not Built For Cars tells the real story, putting cyclists center stage again. Not that the book is only about cyclists. It will also contains lots of automotive history because many automobile pioneers were cyclists before becoming motorists. A surprising number of the first car manufacturers were also cyclists, including Henry Ford. Some carried on cycling right through until the 1940s. One famous motor manufacturing pioneer was a racing tricycle rider to his dying day.

Assessing and Managing the Ecological Impacts of Paved Roads

Author: Committee on Ecological Impacts of Road Density
Publisher: National Academies Press
ISBN: 0309656311
Format: PDF, ePub
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All phases of road development—from construction and use by vehicles to maintenance—affect physical and chemical soil conditions, water flow, and air and water quality, as well as plants and animals. Roads and traffic can alter wildlife habitat, cause vehicle-related mortality, impede animal migration, and disperse nonnative pest species of plants and animals. Integrating environmental considerations into all phases of transportation is an important, evolving process. The increasing awareness of environmental issues has made road development more complex and controversial. Over the past two decades, the Federal Highway Administration and state transportation agencies have increasingly recognized the importance of the effects of transportation on the natural environment. This report provides guidance on ways to reconcile the different goals of road development and environmental conservation. It identifies the ecological effects of roads that can be evaluated in the planning, design, construction, and maintenance of roads and offers several recommendations to help better understand and manage ecological impacts of paved roads.