Basic Mechanical Engineering

Author: Pravin Kumar
Publisher: Pearson Education India
ISBN: 9332517738
Format: PDF, ePub
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Basic Mechanical Engineering covers a wide range of topics and engineering concepts that are required to be learnt as in any undergraduate engineering course. Divided into three parts, this book lays emphasis on explaining the logic and physics of critical problems to develop analytical skills in students.

Basic of Mechanical Engineering Integrating Science Technology and Common Sense Paul D Ronney 2013

Author: Paul D. Ronney
Publisher: Bukupedia
ISBN:
Format: PDF
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If you’re reading this book, you’re probably already enrolled in an introductory university course in Mechanical Engineering. The primary goals of this textbook are, to provide you, the student, with: 1. An understanding of what Mechanical Engineering is and to a lesser extent what it is not 2. Some useful tools that will stay with you throughout your engineering education and career 3. A brief but significant introduction to the major topics of Mechanical Engineering and enough understanding of these topics so that you can relate them to each other 4. A sense of common sense The challenge is to accomplish these objectives without diluting the effort so much that you can’t retain anything. In regards to item 2 above, many of my university courses I remember nothing about, even if I use the information I learned therein. In others I remember “factoids” that I still use. One goal of this textbook is to provide you with a set of useful factoids so that even of you don’t remember any specific words or figures from this text, and don’t even remember where you learned these factoids, you still retain them and apply them when appropriate. In regards to item 3 above, in particular the relationships between topics, this is one area where I feel engineering faculty (myself included) do not do a very good job. Time and again, I find that students learn something in class A, and this in formation is used with different terminology or in a different context in class B, but the students don’t realize they already know the material and can exploit that knowledge. As the old saying goes, “We get too soon old and too late smart…” Everyone says to themselves at some point in their education, “oh… that’s so easy… why didn’t the book [or instructor] just say it that way…” I hope this text will help you to get smarter sooner and older later. A final and less tangible purpose of this text (item 4 above) is to try to instill you with a sense of common sense. Over my 26 years of teaching, I have found that students have become more technically skilled and well rounded but have less ability to think and figure out things for themselves. I attribute this in large part to the fact that when I was a teenager, cars were relatively simple and my friends and I spent hours working on them. When our cars weren’t broken, we would sabotage (nowadays “hack” might be a more descriptive term) each others’ cars. The best hacks were those that were difficult to diagnose, but trivial to fix once you know what was wrong. We learned a lot of common sense working on cars. Today, with electronic controls, cars are very difficult to work on or hack. Even with regards to electronics, today the usual solution to a broken device is to throw it away and buy a newer device, since the old one is probably nearly obsolete by the time it breaks. Of course, common sense per se is probably not teachable, but a sense of common sense, that is, to know when it is needed and how to apply it, might be teachable. If I may be allowed an immodest moment in this textbook, I would like to give an anecdote about my son Peter. When he was not quite 3 years old, like most kids his age had a pair of shoes with lights (actually lightemitting diodes or LEDs) that flash as you walk. These shoes work for a few months until the heel switch fails (usually in the closed position) so that the LEDs stay on continuously for a day or two until the battery goes dead. One morning he noticed that the LEDs in one of his shoes were on continuously. He had a puzzled look on his face, but said nothing. Instead, he went to look for his other shoe, and after rooting around a bit, found it. He then picked it up, hit it against something v and the LEDs flashed as they were supposed to. He then said, holding up the good shoe, “this shoe - fixed… [then pointing at the other shoe] that shoe - broken!” I immediately thought, “I wish all my students had that much common sense…” In my personal experience, about half of engineering is common sense as opposed to specific, technical knowledge that needs to be learned from coursework. Thus, to the extent that common sense can be taught, a final goal of this text is to try to instill this sense of when common sense is needed and even more importantly how to integrate it with technical knowledge. The most employable and promotable engineering graduates are the most flexible ones, i.e. those that take the attitude, “I think I can handle that” rather than “I can’t handle that since no one taught me that specific knowledge.” Students will find at some point in their career, and probably in their very first job, that plans and needs change rapidly due to testing failures, new demands from the customer, other engineers leaving the company, etc. In most engineering programs, retention of incoming first-year students is an important issue; at many universities, less than half of first-year engineering students finish an engineering degree. Of course, not every incoming student who chooses engineering as his/her major should stay in engineering, nor should every student who lacks confidence in the subject drop out, but in all cases it is important that incoming students receive a good enough introduction to the subject that they make an informed, intelligent choice about whether he/she should continue in engineering. Along the thread of retention, I would like to give an anecdote. At Princeton University, in one of my first years of teaching, a student in my thermodynamics class came to my office, almost in tears, after the first midterm. She did fairly poorly on the exam, and she asked me if I thought she belonged in Engineering. (At Princeton thermodynamics was one of the first engineering courses that students took). What was particularly distressing to her was that her fellow students had a much easier time learning the material than she did. She came from a family of artists, musicians and dancers and got little support or encouragement from home for her engineering studies. While she had some of the artistic side in her blood, she said that her real love was engineering, but she wondered was it a lost cause for her? I told her that I didn’t really know whether she should be an engineer, but I would do my best to make sure that she had a good enough experience in engineering that she could make an informed choice from a comfortable position, rather than a decision made under the cloud of fear of failure. With only a little encouragement from me, she did better and better on each subsequent exam and wound up receiving a very respectable grade in the class. She went on to graduate from Princeton with honors and earn a Ph.D. in engineering from a major Midwestern university. I still consider her one of my most important successes in teaching. Thus, a goal of this text is (along with the instructor, fellow students, and infrastructure) is to provide a positive first experience in engineering. There are also many topics that should be (and in some instructors’ views, must be) covered in an introductory engineering textbook but are not covered here because the overriding desire to keep the book’s material manageable within the limits of a one-semester course: 1. History of engineering 2. Philosophy of engineering 3. Engineering ethics Finally, I offer a few suggestions for faculty using this book: 1. Syllabus. Appendix A gives an example syllabus for the course. As Dwight Eisenhower said, “plans are nothing… planning is everything.” 2. Projects. I assign small, hands-on design projects for the students, examples of which are given in Appendix B. 3. Demonstrations. Include simple demonstrations of engineering systems – thermoelectrics, piston-type internal combustion engines, gas turbine engines, transmissions, … 4. Computer graphics. At USC, the introductory Mechanical Engineering course is taught in conjunction with a computer graphics laboratory.

Basic Mechanical Engineering

Author: Basant Agrawal
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 9788126518784
Format: PDF
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Special Features: · Simple language, point-wise descriptions in easy steps.· Chapter organization in exact agreement with sequence of syllabus.· Simple line diagrams.· Concepts supported by ample number of solved examples and illustrations.· Pedagogy in tune with examination pattern of RGTU.· Large number of Practice problems.· Model Question Papers About The Book: This book is designed to suit the core engineering course on basic mechanical engineering offered to first year students of all engineering colleges in Madhya Pradesh. This book meets the syllabus requirements of Basic Mechanical Engineering and has been written for the first year students (all branches) of BE Degree course of RGPV Bhopal affiliated Engineering Institutes. A number of illustrations have been used to explain and clarify the subject matter. Numerous solved examples are presented to make understanding the content of the book easy. Objective type questions have been provided at the end of each chapter to help the students to quickly review the concepts.

Basics of Mechanical Engineering

Author: R. K. Singal
Publisher: I. K. International Pvt Ltd
ISBN: 9788189866204
Format: PDF
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Basics of Mechanical Engineering systematically develops the concepts and principles essential for understanding engineering thermodynamics, mechanics and strength of materials. This book is meant for first year B. Tech students of various technical universities. It will also be helpful for candidates preparing for various competitive examinations.