Beauty and Business

Author: Philip Scranton
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136692576
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Leading historians explore how our ideas of what is attractive are influenced by a broad range of social and economic factors. They force us to reckon with the ways that beauty has been made, bought and sold in modern America.

Artifacts from Modern America

Author: Helen Sheumaker
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 1440846839
Format: PDF
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This intriguing book examines how material objects of the 20th century—ranging from articles of clothing to tools and weapons, communication devices, and toys and games—reflect dominant ideas and testify to the ways social change happens. • Supplies numerous examples of the ways in which American innovation depended on immigrants who invented new technologies and contributed immeasurably towards a uniquely powerful American economy • Demonstrates how American material life was created through globalization, from products imported into this country, such as Atari's video game console, to American products dependent upon imported materials, such as American cigarettes that used imported tobacco, and the coffee percolator on the kitchen table, serving up imported brewed coffee beans • Highlights how the ongoing struggle to achieve true equality and democracy is evidenced through objects such as a voting machine from 1900, the bus that Rosa Parks boarded, the buttons worn by gay rights activists, and the robe Muhammad Ali, a converted Muslim American, fought in—material items that played a role in the ongoing project of American political life

The Technological Fix

Author: Lisa Rosner
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135938504
Format: PDF, ePub
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The term "technological fix" should mean a fix provided by technology--a solution for all of our problems, from medicine and food production to the environment and business. Instead, technological fix has come to mean a cheap, quick fix using inappropriate technology that usually creates more problems than it solves. This collection sets out the distinction between a technological fix and a true technological solution. Bringing together scholars from a variety of disciplines, the essays trace the technological fix as it has appeared throughout the twentieth century. Addressing such "fixes" as artificial hearts, industrial agriculture and climate engineering, these essays examine our need to turn to technology for solutions to all of our problems.

The American economic history reader

Author: John William Malsberger
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780415962674
Format: PDF, ePub
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Economics as a discipline often relies on abstract theories and formulas to exlain the functions of national economies. American Economic History: Documents and Readings is a collection of primary documents and essays illustrating the practical applications of these theories in real life, showing how and why the American economy developed as it did. It identifies and explains some of the key questions in economic history, as well as documents some of the leading voices in the discipline. Suggestions for further reading at the end of each chapter provide students with an additional study tool. Twelve chapters survey the development and growth of the American economy from colonial times through the presidency of George W. Bush. Each chapter focuses on a controversial issue in American economic history and includes two or more articles written by experts that provide different interpretations of that issue, together with a series of related primary source documents. Each chapter begins with a general introduction that briefly outlines an important question in American economic history, and concludes with a list of additional relevant sources on the topic.

Food Chains

Author: Warren Belasco
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 0812204441
Format: PDF
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In recent years, the integrity of food production and distribution has become an issue of wide social concern. The media frequently report on cases of food contamination as well as on the risks of hormones and cloning. Journalists, documentary filmmakers, and activists have had their say, but until now a survey of the latest research on the history of the modern food-provisioning system—the network that connects farms and fields to supermarkets and the dining table—has been unavailable. In Food Chains, Warren Belasco and Roger Horowitz present a collection of fascinating case studies that reveal the historical underpinnings and institutional arrangements that compose this system. The dozen essays in Food Chains range widely in subject, from the pig, poultry, and seafood industries to the origins of the shopping cart. The book examines what it took to put ice in nineteenth-century refrigerators, why Soviet citizens could buy ice cream whenever they wanted, what made Mexican food popular in France, and why Americans turned to commercial pet food in place of table scraps for their dogs and cats. Food Chains goes behind the grocery shelves, explaining why Americans in the early twentieth century preferred to buy bread rather than make it and how Southerners learned to like self-serve shopping. Taken together, these essays demonstrate the value of a historical perspective on the modern food-provisioning system.