Becoming a Citizen

Author: Irene Bloemraad
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520248984
Format: PDF, Mobi
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"Becoming a Citizen is a terrific book. Important, innovative, well argued, theoretically significant, and empirically grounded. It will be the definitive work in the field for years to come."--Frank D. Bean, Co-Director, Center for Research on Immigration, Population and Public Policy "This book is in three ways innovative. First, it avoids the domestic navel-gazing of U.S .immigration studies, through an obvious yet ingenious comparison with Canada. Second, it shows that official multiculturalism and common citizenship may very well go together, revealing Canada, and not the United States, as leader in successful immigrant integration. Thirdly, the book provides a compelling picture of how the state matters in making immigrants citizens. An outstanding contribution to the migration and citizenship literature!"--Christian Joppke, American University of Paris

Becoming a Citizen

Author: Irene Bloemraad
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520248996
Format: PDF, Mobi
Download Now
"Becoming a Citizen is a terrific book. Important, innovative, well argued, theoretically significant, and empirically grounded. It will be the definitive work in the field for years to come."—Frank D. Bean, Co-Director, Center for Research on Immigration, Population and Public Policy "This book is in three ways innovative. First, it avoids the domestic navel-gazing of U.S .immigration studies, through an obvious yet ingenious comparison with Canada. Second, it shows that official multiculturalism and common citizenship may very well go together, revealing Canada, and not the United States, as leader in successful immigrant integration. Thirdly, the book provides a compelling picture of how the state matters in making immigrants citizens. An outstanding contribution to the migration and citizenship literature!"—Christian Joppke, American University of Paris

Becoming a Citizen

Author: Irene Bloemraad
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520940024
Format: PDF
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How can societies that welcome immigrants from around the world create civic cohesion and political community out of ethnic and racial diversity? This thought-provoking book is the first to provide a comparative perspective on how the United States and Canada encourage foreigners to become citizens. Based on vivid in-depth interviews with Portuguese immigrants and Vietnamese refugees in Boston and Toronto and on statistical analysis and documentary data, Becoming a Citizen shows that greater state support for settlement and an official government policy of multiculturalism in Canada increase citizenship acquisition and political participation among the foreign born. The United States, long a successful example of immigrant integration, today has greater problems incorporating newcomers into the polity. While many previous accounts suggest that differences in naturalization and political involvement stem from differences in immigrants’ political skills and interests, Irene Bloemraad argues that foreigners' political incorporation is not just a question of the type of people countries receive, but also fundamentally of the reception given to them. She discusses the implications of her findings for other countries, including Australia and immigrant nations in Europe.

Rallying for Immigrant Rights

Author: Kim Voss
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520267540
Format: PDF
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“Through the excellent and noteworthy pieces of scholarship here, Rallying for Immigrant Rights vividly captures the dynamics of the 2006 immigration protests. This volume heralds an exciting shift in the study of political participation and raises timely questions about protest, immigration, and U.S. politics.” —Kenneth T. Andrews, author of Freedom is a Constant Struggle: The Mississippi Civil Rights Movement and Its Legacy “Rallying for Immigrant Rights challenges the existing theories in political behavior and social movement writings. This is a timely and excellent volume, and it should be required reading for anyone interested in political activism.” —Lisa García Bedolla, Chair, Center for Latino Policy Research, UC Berkeley “The essays in Rallying for Immigrant Rights offer an enlightening perspective on the 2006 protests and what they mean for the future of immigration politics in the U.S. This impressively orginal volume will be a standard reference for years to come.” —Karthick Ramakrishnan, Associate Professor of Political Science, UC Riverside

The Road to Citizenship

Author: Sofya Aptekar
Publisher: Rutgers University Press
ISBN: 0813575443
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Between 2000 and 2011, eight million immigrants became American citizens. In naturalization ceremonies large and small these new Americans pledged an oath of allegiance to the United States, gaining the right to vote, serve on juries, and hold political office; access to certain jobs; and the legal rights of full citizens. In The Road to Citizenship, Sofya Aptekar analyzes what the process of becoming a citizen means for these newly minted Americans and what it means for the United States as a whole. Examining the evolution of the discursive role of immigrants in American society from potential traitors to morally superior “supercitizens,” Aptekar’s in-depth research uncovers considerable contradictions with the way naturalization works today. Census data reveal that citizenship is distributed in ways that increasingly exacerbate existing class and racial inequalities, at the same time that immigrants’ own understandings of naturalization defy accepted stories we tell about assimilation, citizenship, and becoming American. Aptekar contends that debates about immigration must be broadened beyond the current focus on borders and documentation to include larger questions about the definition of citizenship. Aptekar’s work brings into sharp relief key questions about the overall system: does the current naturalization process accurately reflect our priorities as a nation and reflect the values we wish to instill in new residents and citizens? Should barriers to full membership in the American polity be lowered? What are the implications of keeping the process the same or changing it? Using archival research, interviews, analysis of census and survey data, and participant observation of citizenship ceremonies, The Road to Citizenship demonstrates the ways in which naturalization itself reflects the larger operations of social cohesion and democracy in America.

The Making of English National Identity

Author: Krishan Kumar
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107320097
Format: PDF
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Why is English national identity so enigmatic and so elusive? Why, unlike the Scots, Welsh, Irish and most of continental Europe, do the English find it so difficult to say who they are? The Making of English National Identity, first published in 2003, is a fascinating exploration of Englishness and what it means to be English. Drawing on historical, sociological and literary theory, Krishan Kumar examines the rise of English nationalism and issues of race and ethnicity from earliest times to the present day. He argues that the long history of the English as an imperial people has, as with other imperial people like the Russians and the Austrians, developed a sense of missionary nationalism which in the interests of unity and empire has necessitated the repression of ordinary expressions of nationalism. Professor Kumar's lively and provocative approach challenges readers to reconsider their pre-conceptions about national identity and who the English really are.

Becoming Multicultural

Author: Triadafilos Triadafilopoulos
Publisher: UBC Press
ISBN: 077481568X
Format: PDF, ePub
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During the first half of the twentieth century, Canada and Germany’s responses to questions of national membership consisted of discriminatory policies aimed at harnessing migration for economic ends. Yet, by the end of the century, both countries were transformed into highly diverse multicultural societies. How did this remarkable shift come about? Triadafilopoulos argues that, after the war, global human rights norms intersected with domestic political identities and institutions, opening the way for the liberalization of Canada and Germany’s immigration and citizenship policies. His is a thought-provoking analysis that sheds light on the dynamics of membership politics and policy making in contemporary liberal-democratic countries.

The Integration of Immigrants into American Society

Author: National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine
Publisher: National Academies Press
ISBN: 0309373980
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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The United States prides itself on being a nation of immigrants, and the country has a long history of successfully absorbing people from across the globe. The integration of immigrants and their children contributes to our economic vitality and our vibrant and ever changing culture. We have offered opportunities to immigrants and their children to better themselves and to be fully incorporated into our society and in exchange immigrants have become Americans - embracing an American identity and citizenship, protecting our country through service in our military, fostering technological innovation, harvesting its crops, and enriching everything from the nation's cuisine to its universities, music, and art. Today, the 41 million immigrants in the United States represent 13.1 percent of the U.S. population. The U.S.-born children of immigrants, the second generation, represent another 37.1 million people, or 12 percent of the population. Thus, together the first and second generations account for one out of four members of the U.S. population. Whether they are successfully integrating is therefore a pressing and important question. Are new immigrants and their children being well integrated into American society, within and across generations? Do current policies and practices facilitate their integration? How is American society being transformed by the millions of immigrants who have arrived in recent decades? To answer these questions, this new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine summarizes what we know about how immigrants and their descendants are integrating into American society in a range of areas such as education, occupations, health, and language.

Handbook of Research Methods in Migration

Author: Carlos Vargas-Silva
Publisher: Edward Elgar Publishing
ISBN: 1781005230
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Covering both qualitative and quantitative topics, the expert contributors in this Handbook explore fundamental issues of scientific logic, methodology and methods, through to practical applications of different techniques and approaches in migration research. The chapters of this interdisciplinary Handbook maintain an introductory level of discussion on migration research methods, while providing readers with references necessary for those wishing to go deeper into the topic. Using a combination of concepts and techniques with research experiences from the field, this Handbook will prove to be an invaluable guide. Master-level students and academics in migration-related programs will find this compendium a useful and stimulating resource. It also discusses issues relating to the collection of data on migrants, including topics such as survey designs, interviewing techniques and ethical issues that policymakers and government employees will find informative. Advisory Board: Professor Stephen Castles Professor Robin Cohen Professor Josh DeWind Professor Raoel Delgado Wise