Becoming Ms Burton

Author: Susan Burton
Publisher: The New Press
ISBN: 1620972131
Format: PDF, Docs
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Winner of the 49th NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Literary Work (Biography/Autobiography) Winner of the 2017 Goddard Riverside Stephan Russo Book Prize for Social Justice “Valuable . . . [like Michelle] Alexander’s The New Jim Crow.” —Los Angeles Review of Books “Susan Burton is a national treasure . . . her life story is testimony to the human capacity for resilience and recovery . . . [Becoming Ms. Burton is] a stunning memoir.” —Nicholas Kristof, in The New York Times One woman’s remarkable odyssey from tragedy to prison to recovery—and recognition as a leading figure in the national justice reform movement Susan Burton’s world changed in an instant when her five-year-old son was killed by a van driving down their street. Consumed by grief and without access to professional help, Susan self-medicated, becoming addicted first to cocaine, then crack. As a resident of South Los Angeles, a black community under siege in the War on Drugs, it was but a matter of time before Susan was arrested. She cycled in and out of prison for over fifteen years; never was she offered therapy or treatment for addiction. On her own, she eventually found a private drug rehabilitation facility. Once clean, Susan dedicated her life to supporting women facing similar struggles. Her organization, A New Way of Life, operates five safe homes in Los Angeles that supply a lifeline to hundreds of formerly incarcerated women and their children—setting them on the track to education and employment rather than returns to prison. Becoming Ms. Burton not only humanizes the deleterious impact of mass incarceration, it also points the way to the kind of structural and policy changes that will offer formerly incarcerated people the possibility of a life of meaning and dignity.

Becoming Ms Burton

Author: Susan Burton
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781620974353
Format: PDF, Docs
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"Valuable . . . [like Michelle] Alexander?s The New Jim Crow." --Los Angeles Review of Books "Susan Burton is a national treasure . . . her life story is testimony to the human capacity for resilience and recovery . . . [Becoming Ms. Burton is] a stunning memoir." --Nicholas Kristof, in The New York Times Winner of the prestigious NAACP Image Award, a uniquely American story of trauma, incarceration, and "the breathtaking resilience of the human spirit" (Michelle Alexander) Widely hailed as a stunning memoir from someone more likely to be locked up or otherwise silenced, Becoming Ms. Burton is the life story of Susan Burton, whose organization A New Way of Life has transformed the lives of more than one thousand formerly incarcerated women in Los Angeles. In this "stirring and moving tour-de-force" (John Legend), Susan takes us on her own journey through the criminal justice system--from growing up amid poverty and abuse in L.A. to battling addiction after tragically losing her son, and from cycling in and out of prison for more than fifteen years to her transformation into a powerful advocate for "a more humane justice system guided by compassion and dignity" (Booklist, starred review). Frequently compared to The New Jim Crow and Just Mercy, Becoming Ms. Burton--winner of the Goddard Riverside Stephan Russo Book Prize for Social Justice--is an unforgettable book on the devastating impact of mass incarceration that powerfully shows the structural changes necessary to restore the lives of formerly incarcerated people. The paperback edition includes a reading group guide.

Becoming Ms Burton

Author: Susan Burton
Publisher: The New Press
ISBN: 1620974398
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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“Valuable . . . [like Michelle] Alexander’s The New Jim Crow.” —Los Angeles Review of Books “Susan Burton is a national treasure . . . her life story is testimony to the human capacity for resilience and recovery . . . [Becoming Ms. Burton is] a stunning memoir.” —Nicholas Kristof, in The New York Times Winner of the prestigious NAACP Image Award, a uniquely American story of trauma, incarceration, and “the breathtaking resilience of the human spirit” (Michelle Alexander) Widely hailed as a stunning memoir from someone more likely to be locked up or otherwise silenced, Becoming Ms. Burton is the life story of Susan Burton, whose organization A New Way of Life has transformed the lives of more than one thousand formerly incarcerated women in Los Angeles. In this “stirring and moving tour-de-force” (John Legend), Susan takes us on her own journey through the criminal justice system—from growing up amid poverty and abuse in L.A. to battling addiction after tragically losing her son, and from cycling in and out of prison for more than fifteen years to her transformation into a powerful advocate for “a more humane justice system guided by compassion and dignity” (Booklist, starred review). Frequently compared to The New Jim Crow and Just Mercy, Becoming Ms. Burton—winner of the Goddard Riverside Stephan Russo Book Prize for Social Justice—is an unforgettable book on the devastating impact of mass incarceration that powerfully shows the structural changes necessary to restore the lives of formerly incarcerated people.

Breathe

Author: Angela Burgin Logan
Publisher: BroadStreet Publishing Group LLC
ISBN: 1424553032
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Madam

Author: Cari Lynn
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101634758
Format: PDF, Mobi
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When vice had a legal home and jazz was being born—the captivating story of an infamous true-life madam New Orleans, 1900. Mary Deubler makes a meager living as an “alley whore.” That all changes when bible-thumping Alderman Sidney Story forces the creation of a red-light district that’s mockingly dubbed “Storyville.” Mary believes there’s no place for a lowly girl like her in the high-class bordellos of Storyville’s Basin Street, where Champagne flows and beautiful girls turn tricks in luxurious bedrooms. But with gumption, twists of fate, even a touch of Voodoo, Mary rises above her hopeless lot to become the notorious Madame Josie Arlington. Filled with fascinating historical details and cameos by Jelly Roll Morton, Louis Armstrong, and E. J. Bellocq, Madam is a fantastic romp through The Big Easy and the irresistible story of a woman who rose to power long before the era of equal rights. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Racial Purity and Dangerous Bodies

Author: Rima L. Vesely-Flad
Publisher: Fortress Press
ISBN: 1506420508
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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At the center of contemporary struggles over aggressive policing practices is an assumed association in U.S. culture of blackness with criminality. Rima L. Vesely-Flad examines the religious and philosophical constructs of the black body in U.S. society, examining racialized ideas about purity and pollution as they have developed historically and as they are institutionalized today in racially disproportionate policing and mass incarceration. These systems work, she argues, to keeps threatening elements of society in a constant state of harassment and tension so that they are unable to pollute the morals of mainstream society. Policing establishes racialized boundaries between communities deemed “dangerous” and communities deemed “pure” and, along with prisons and reentry policies, sequesters and restrains the pollution of convicted “criminals,” thus perpetuating the image of the threatening black male criminal. Vesely-Flad shows how the anti-Stop and Frisk and the Black Lives Matter movements have confronted these systems by exposing unquestioned assumptions about blackness and criminality. They hold the potential, she argues, to reverse the construal of “pollution” and invasion in America’s urban cores if they extend their challenge to mass imprisonment and the barriers to reentry of convicted felons.

Writing My Wrongs

Author: Shaka Senghor
Publisher: Convergent Books
ISBN: 1101907304
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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New York Times Bestseller A memoir of redemption, reform, and second chances amidst America's mass incarceration epidemic. Shaka Senghor was raised in a middle class neighborhood on Detroit’s east side during the height of the 1980s crack epidemic. An honor roll student and a natural leader, he dreamed of becoming a doctor—but at age 11, his parents' marriage began to unravel, and the beatings from his mother worsened, sending him on a downward spiral that saw him run away from home, turn to drug dealing to survive, and end up in prison for murder at the age of 19, fuming with anger and despair. Writing My Wrongs is the story of what came next. During his nineteen-year incarceration, seven of which were spent in solitary confinement, Senghor discovered literature, meditation, self-examination, and the kindness of others—tools he used to confront the demons of his past, forgive the people who hurt him, and begin atoning for the wrongs he had committed. Upon his release at age thirty-eight, Senghor became an activist and mentor to young men and women facing circumstances like his. His work in the community and the courage to share his story led him to fellowships at the MIT Media Lab and the Kellogg Foundation and invitations to speak at events like TED and the Aspen Ideas Festival. In equal turns, Writing My Wrongs is a page-turning portrait of life in the shadow of poverty, violence, and fear; an unforgettable story of redemption, reminding us that our worst deeds don’t define us; and a compelling witness to our country’s need for rethinking its approach to crime, prison, and the men and women sent there. — Oprah's Super Soul 100 Member

Black Prisoners and Their World Alabama 1865 1900

Author: Mary Ellen Curtin
Publisher: Rutgers University Press
ISBN: 9780813919843
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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In the late nineteenth century, prisoners in Alabama, the vast majority of them African Americans, were forced to work as coal miners under the most horrendous conditions imaginable. Black Prisoners and Their World draws on a variety of sources, including the reports and correspondence of prison inspectors and letters from prisoners and their families, to explore the history of the African American men and women whose labor made Alabama's prison system the most profitable in the nation. To coal companies and the state of Alabama, black prisoners provided, respectively, sources of cheap labor and state revenue. By 1883, a significant percentage of the workforce in the Birmingham coal industry was made up of convicts. But to the families and communities from which the prisoners came, the convict lease was a living symbol of the dashed hopes of Reconstruction. Indeed, the lease—the system under which the prisoners labored for the profit of the company and the state—demonstrated Alabama's reluctance to let go of slavery and its determination to pursue profitable prisons no matter what the human cost. Despite the efforts of prison officials, progressive reformers, and labor unions, the state refused to take prisoners out of the coal mines. In the course of her narrative, Mary Ellen Curtin describes how some prisoners died while others endured unspeakable conditions and survived. Curtin argues that black prisoners used their mining skills to influence prison policy, demand better treatment, and become wage-earning coal miners upon their release. Black Prisoners and Their World unearths new evidence about life under the most repressive institution in the New South. Curtin suggests disturbing parallels between the lease and today's burgeoning system of private incarceration.

Leg the Spread

Author: Cari Lynn
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 9781841126647
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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'Leg The Spread' tells the story of one woman's experience of surviving the stereotyping, stress and sexism of the ultimate boys club - the commodities trading floor.

Race to Incarcerate

Author: Marc Mauer
Publisher: New Press, The
ISBN: 1595585419
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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"Do not underestimate the power of the book you are holding in your hands." —Michelle Alexander More than 2 million people are now imprisoned in the United States, producing the highest rate of incarceration in the world. How did this happen? As the director of The Sentencing Project, Marc Mauer has long been one of the country’s foremost experts on sentencing policy, race, and the criminal justice system. His book Race to Incarcerate has become the essential text for understanding the exponential growth of the U.S. prison system; Michelle Alexander, author of the bestselling The New Jim Crow, calls it "utterly indispensable." Now, Sabrina Jones, a member of the World War 3 Illustrated collective and an acclaimed author of politically engaged comics, has collaborated with Mauer to adapt and update the original book into a vivid and compelling comics narrative. Jones's dramatic artwork adds passion and compassion to the complex story of the penal system’s shift from rehabilitation to punishment and the ensuing four decades of prison expansion, its interplay with the devastating "War on Drugs," and its corrosive effect on generations of Americans. With a preface by Mauer and a foreword by Alexander, Race to Incarcerate: A Graphic Retelling presents a compelling argument about mass incarceration’s tragic impact on communities of color—if current trends continue, one of every three black males and one of every six Latino males born today can expect to do time in prison. The race to incarcerate is not only a failed social policy, but also one that prevents a just, diverse society from flourishing.