Black Power

Author: Richard Wright
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 006201837X
Format: PDF
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Originally published in 1954, Richard Wright's Black Power is an extraordinary nonfiction work by one of America's premier literary giants of the twentieth century. An impassioned chronicle of the author's trip to Africa's Gold Coast before it became the free nation of Ghana, it speaks eloquently of empowerment and possibility, and resonates loudly to this day. Also included in this omnibus edition are two nonfiction works Wright produced around the time of Black Power. White Man, Listen! is a stirring collection of his essays on race, politics, and other essential social concerns ("Deserves to be read with utmost seriousness"—New York Times). The Color Curtain is an indispensable work urging the removal of the color barrier. It remains one of the key commentaries on the question of race in the modern era. ("Truth-telling will perhaps always be unpopular and suspect, but in The Color Curtain, as in all his later nonfiction, Wright did not hesitate to tell the truth as he saw it."—Amritjit Singh, Ohio University)

The Color Curtain

Author: Richard Wright
Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi
ISBN: 9780878057481
Format: PDF, Docs
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The expatriate, one of America's greatest black writers, giving a bold assessment of the world's outlook on race, a report of the Bandung Conference of 1955.

American Hunger

Author: Richard Wright
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 0062041509
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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American Hunger, published posthumously in 1977, was originally intended as the second volume of Black Boy.

Romanticism and Pragmatism

Author: U. Schulenberg
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 113747419X
Format: PDF, ePub
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This interdisciplinary project is situated at the boundary between literary studies and philosophy. Its chief focus is on American Romanticism and it examines work by a number of prominent writers and philosophers, from Whitman and Thoreau to Barthes and Rorty.

Revision as Resistance in Twentieth Century American Drama

Author: M. Malburne-Wade
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137441615
Format: PDF, Mobi
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American dramas consciously rewrite the past as a means of determined criticism and intentional resistance. While modern criticism often sees the act of revision as derivative, Malburne-Wade uses Victor Turner's concept of the social drama and the concept of the liminal to argue for a more complicated view of revision.

The Long Dream

Author: Richard Wright
Publisher: UPNE
ISBN: 9781555534233
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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In a small town in Mississippi, a prosperous black mortician's business arrangements with police and politicians unravel as his son enters adulthood.

The Cambridge Companion to American Novelists

Author: Timothy Parrish
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107013135
Format: PDF, Docs
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This volume provides newly commissioned essays from leading scholars and critics on the social and cultural history of the novel in America. It explores the work of the most influential American novelists of the past 200 years, including Melville, Twain, James, Wharton, Cather, Faulkner, Ellison, Pynchon, and Morrison.

Abandoning the Black Hero

Author: John C. Charles
Publisher: Rutgers University Press
ISBN: 0813554349
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Abandoning the Black Hero is the first book to examine the postwar African American white-life novel—novels with white protagonists written by African Americans. These fascinating works have been understudied despite having been written by such defining figures in the tradition as Richard Wright, Zora Neale Hurston, James Baldwin, Ann Petry, and Chester Himes, as well as lesser known but formerly best-selling authors Willard Motley and Frank Yerby. John C. Charles argues that these fictions have been overlooked because they deviate from two critical suppositions: that black literature is always about black life and that when it represents whiteness, it must attack white supremacy. The authors are, however, quite sympathetic in the treatment of their white protagonists, which Charles contends should be read not as a failure of racial pride but instead as a strategy for claiming creative freedom, expansive moral authority, and critical agency. In an era when “Negro writers” were expected to protest, their sympathetic treatment of white suffering grants these authors a degree of racial privacy previously unavailable to them. White writers, after all, have the privilege of racial privacy because they are never pressured to write only about white life. Charles reveals that the freedom to abandon the “Negro problem” encouraged these authors to explore a range of new genres and themes, generating a strikingly diverse body of novels that significantly revise our understanding of mid-twentieth-century black writing.