Black White and Indian

Author: Claudio Saunt
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780195313109
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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"History professor Saunt examines the complicated history of race in America through five generations of a Native American family, the Graysons, whose long-denied descendants include African slaves. From 1780 to 1920, Saunt traces the Graysons and their interaction and intermixing with whites and blacks. At the center of this family saga is Katy Grayson, a Creek woman, who, along with her brother, had children with partners of African descent. Katy later married a Scottish-Creek man, disowned her black children, and became a slave owner. Her brother, William, stayed with his black wife and children, later emancipating them. In 1907, when Creeks were granted U.S. citizenship, state law split the family by defining some as black and some as white. The divergent paths of these families parallel the interactions among whites, blacks, and Indians as racial and social differences solidified through slavery and the mistreatment of Indians. This is a fascinating look at a seldom-recognized aspect of American race relations." -- Vernon Ford.

Recovering History Constructing Race

Author: Martha Menchaca
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 0292752547
Format: PDF
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"In this book it is my intent to write about the Mexican American people's Indian, White, and Black racial history. In doing so, I offer an interpretive historical analysis of the experiences of the Mexican Americans' ancestors in Mexico and the United States. This analysis begins with the Mexican Americans' prehistoric foundations and continues into the late twentieth century. My focus, however, is on exploring the legacy of racial discrimination that was established in the aftermath of the Spanish conquest and was later intensified by the United States government when in 1848, it conquered northern Mexico (presently the U.S. Southwest) and annexed it to the United States (Menchaca 1999:3). The central period of study ranges from 1570 to 1898"--Page 1.

Black White and Indian

Author: Claudio Saunt
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780195313109
Format: PDF, Mobi
Download Now
"History professor Saunt examines the complicated history of race in America through five generations of a Native American family, the Graysons, whose long-denied descendants include African slaves. From 1780 to 1920, Saunt traces the Graysons and their interaction and intermixing with whites and blacks. At the center of this family saga is Katy Grayson, a Creek woman, who, along with her brother, had children with partners of African descent. Katy later married a Scottish-Creek man, disowned her black children, and became a slave owner. Her brother, William, stayed with his black wife and children, later emancipating them. In 1907, when Creeks were granted U.S. citizenship, state law split the family by defining some as black and some as white. The divergent paths of these families parallel the interactions among whites, blacks, and Indians as racial and social differences solidified through slavery and the mistreatment of Indians. This is a fascinating look at a seldom-recognized aspect of American race relations." -- Vernon Ford.

Making the White Man s Indian

Author: Angela Aleiss
Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group
ISBN: 9780275983963
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Looks at the history of depictions and treatment of Native Americans in movies from the silent era through the present day.

Identity in Black and White

Author: Shae Ann Adams
Publisher:
ISBN:
Format: PDF
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During the late 19th and early 20th centuries, thousands of American Indian children attended off-reservation boarding schools where administrators hoped to assimilate students into mainstream Anglo society. To achieve this goal, administrators forcefully changed the outward appearances of students while depriving them of their own languages and traditions. Postcards of these schools were sold to curious school outsiders. This thesis examines those postcards in relation to the myriad of student experiences within the framework [of] an online exhibition.

The Absolutely True Diary of a Part Time Indian

Author: Sherman Alexie
Publisher: Little, Brown Books for Young Readers
ISBN: 0316219304
Format: PDF
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Bestselling author Sherman Alexie tells the story of Junior, a budding cartoonist growing up on the Spokane Indian Reservation. Determined to take his future into his own hands, Junior leaves his troubled school on the rez to attend an all-white farm town high school where the only other Indian is the school mascot. Heartbreaking, funny, and beautifully written, The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, which is based on the author's own experiences, coupled with poignant drawings by Ellen Forney that reflect the character's art, chronicles the contemporary adolescence of one Native American boy as he attempts to break away from the life he was destined to live. With a forward by Markus Zusak, interviews with Sherman Alexie and Ellen Forney, and four-color interior art throughout, this edition is perfect for fans and collectors alike.

Black Indians

Author: William Loren Katz
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1442446366
Format: PDF, Docs
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Traces the history of relations between blacks and American Indians, and the existence of black Indians, from the earliest foreign landings through pioneer days.

The White Man s Indian

Author: Robert F. Berkhofer
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307761975
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Columbus called them "Indians" because his geography was faulty. But that name and, more importantly, the images it has come to suggest have endured for five centuries, not only obscuring the true identity of the original Americans but serving as an idealogical weapon in their subjugation. Now, in this brilliant and deeply disturbing reinterpretation of the American past, Robert Berkhofer has written an impressively documented account of the self-serving stereotypes Europeans and white Americans have concocted about the "Indian": Noble Savage or bloodthirsty redskin, he was deemed inferior in the light of western, Christian civilization and manipulated to its benefit. A thought-provoking and revelatory study of the absolute, seemingly ineradicable pervasiveness of white racism, The White Man's Indian is a truly important book which penetrates to the very heart of our understanding of ourselves. "A splendid inquiry into, and analysis of, the process whereby white adventurers and the white middle class fabricated the Indian to their own advantage. It deserves a wide and thoughtful readership." —Chronicle of Higher Education "A compelling and definitive history...of racist preconceptions in white behavior toward native Americans." —Leo Marx, The New York Times Book Review

Black and White

Author: Bryan Peppin
Publisher: AuthorHouse
ISBN: 1477218009
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Bryan was born into an "Anglo-Indian" family in 1952. His schooling was completed in 1968, exclusively in "Anglo-Indian" schools, which, up to that point in time at least, were identifiably "Anglo-Indian". Growing up with an "us/them" attitude, the issue was not a real problem until early research work in the field of British Fiction on India brought to Bryan's notice the unchanging negative profiling of the "Anglo-Indian" in books on the theme. Full-fledged research on the "Anglo-Indian" identity ( which culminated in a PhD from the University of Madras in 2010) threw up the picture of a minimal human species that combined the worst traits of East and West. Since Kipling's refrain was so blindly accepted in the nineteenth century, and most of the twentieth century, writers--both Indian and Western--blatantly vilified the "Anglo-Indian", in life as in fiction. This book is an attempt to set down an accurate record, by examining some of the latest (and not so new) books on the exclusive subject. It also calls to account the horrendous and often unforgivable errors made by some writers and many critics. Today, more than ever before, "Anglo-Indians" are completely at home, in India, as well as in other parts of the English-speaking world. It is hoped that, in time, a clearer, more humane picture of the real "Anglo-Indian" will emerge, as it must, when understanding erases the dark images of the past.

Black Slaves Indian Masters

Author: Barbara Krauthamer
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469607115
Format: PDF, Kindle
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From the late eighteenth century through the end of the Civil War, Choctaw and Chickasaw Indians bought, sold, and owned Africans and African Americans as slaves, a fact that persisted after the tribes' removal from the Deep South to Indian Territory. The tribes formulated racial and gender ideologies that justified this practice and marginalized free black people in the Indian nations well after the Civil War and slavery had ended. Through the end of the nineteenth century, ongoing conflicts among Choctaw, Chickasaw, and U.S. lawmakers left untold numbers of former slaves and their descendants in the two Indian nations without citizenship in either the Indian nations or the United States. In this groundbreaking study, Barbara Krauthamer rewrites the history of southern slavery, emancipation, race, and citizenship to reveal the centrality of Native American slaveholders and the black people they enslaved. Krauthamer's examination of slavery and emancipation highlights the ways Indian women's gender roles changed with the arrival of slavery and changed again after emancipation and reveals complex dynamics of race that shaped the lives of black people and Indians both before and after removal.