Blacked Out

Author: Alasdair Roberts
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9781139448925
Format: PDF
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Nearly forty years ago the US Congress passed the landmark Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) giving the public the right to government documents. This 'right to know' has been used over the past decades to challenge overreaching Presidents and secretive government agencies. The example of transparency in government has served as an example to nations around the world spawning similar statutes in fifty-nine countries. This 2006 book examines the evolution of the move toward openness in government. It looks at how technology has aided the disclosure and dissemination of information. The author tackles the question of whether the drive for transparency has stemmed the desire for government secrecy and discusses how many governments ignore or frustrate the legal requirements for the release of key documents. Blacked Out is an important contribution during a time where profound changes in the structure of government are changing access to government documents.

Government Secrecy

Author: Susan Maret
Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing
ISBN: 0857243896
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Divided into six sections, this title examines Government secrecy (GS) in a variety of contexts, including comparative examination of government control of information, new definitions, categories, censorship, ethics, and secrecy's relationship with freedom of information and transparency.

Soziologie als M glichkeit

Author: Cécile Rol
Publisher: Springer-Verlag
ISBN: 3531914375
Format: PDF, ePub
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Georg Simmels "Soziologie" (1908) hat auf die Begrifflichkeit und auf die Methoden des Faches in Deutschland sowie im Ausland tief gewirkt. In diesem Buch, das Simmel fünfzehn Jahre Arbeit abverlangt hat, verbindet sich in der Analyse des Gegenstandes die Konstruktion des soziologischen Blicks mit dessen praktischer Anwendung. Was aber bleibt 100 Jahre später von der "Soziologie"? Wie wird sie von den unterschiedlichen Spezialisten der Sozial- und Geisteswissenschaften wahrgenommen? Diese Fragen haben die Herausgeber Geistes- und Gesellschaftswissenschaftlern in unterschiedlichen Ländern gestellt, um zu erfahren, wie sie Simmels "Soziologie" in ihre Arbeit und ihre tägliche Forschungspraxis einbeziehen. Wegen ihrer Konstruktion und ihrer thematischen Vielfalt erweist sich die Soziologie oft als unvollendetes Werk. Die Autoren in diesem Band tragen dieser Unabgeschlossenheit Rechnung, indem auch sie dem Leser keine fertigen Analysen und Konstruktionen, sondern Einblicke in laufende Arbeiten auf verschiedenen Ebenen des gesellschaftlichen Lebens bieten. Damit zeigen sie, wie fruchtbar die "Soziologie" für die zeitgenössischen Untersuchungen der Kultur und der Gesellschaft bleibt, und bieten gleichzeitig eine Einführung in die großen Themen der Disziplin an.

Investigating Operational Incidents in a Military Context

Author: David W. Lovell
Publisher: Martinus Nijhoff Publishers
ISBN: 9004277102
Format: PDF
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The need for robust investigations into military operational incidents is critical to the proper functioning of militaries and to international justice. Investigating Operational Incidents explores the many challenges surrounding such investigations, the emerging international law, and its likely evolution.

The Oxford Handbook of Public Accountability

Author: Mark Bovens
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191002577
Format: PDF, Docs
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Over the past two decades public accountability has become not only an icon in political, managerial, and administrative discourse but also the object of much scholarly analysis across a broad range of social and administrative sciences. This handbook provides a state of the art overview of recent scholarship on public accountability. It collects, consolidates, and integrates an upsurge of inquiry currently scattered across many disciplines and subdisciplines. It provides a one-stop-shop on the subject, not only for academics who study accountability, but also for practitioners who are designing, adjusting, or struggling with mechanisms for accountable governance. Drawing on the best scholars in the field from around the world, The Oxford Handbook of Public Accountability showcases conceptual and normative as well as the empirical approaches in public accountability studies. In addition to giving an overview of scholarly research in a variety of disciplines, it takes stock of a wide range of accountability mechanisms and practices across the public, private and non-profit sectors, making this volume a must-have for both practitioners and scholars, both established and new to the field.

The Long Decade

Author: David Jenkins
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199368341
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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The terrorist attacks of 9/11 precipitated significant legal changes over the ensuing ten years, a "long decade" that saw both domestic and international legal systems evolve in reaction to the seemingly permanent threat of international terrorism. At the same time, globalization produced worldwide insecurity that weakened the nation-state's ability to monopolize violence and assure safety for its people. The Long Decade: How 9/11 Changed the Law contains contributions by international legal scholars who critically reflect on how the terrorist attacks of 9/11 precipitated these legal changes. This book examines how the uncertainties of the "long decade" made fear a political and legal force, challenged national constitutional orders, altered fundamental assumptions about the rule of law, and ultimately raised questions about how democracy and human rights can cope with competing security pressures, while considering the complex process of crafting anti-terrorism measures.

The Right to Know

Author: Ann Florini
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231512074
Format: PDF, ePub
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The Right to Know is a timely and compelling consideration of a vital question: What information should governments and other powerful organizations disclose? Excessive secrecy corrodes democracy, facilitates corruption, and undermines good public policymaking, but keeping a lid on military strategies, personal data, and trade secrets is crucial to the protection of the public interest. Over the past several years, transparency has swept the world. India and South Africa have adopted groundbreaking national freedom of information laws. China is on the verge of promulgating new openness regulations that build on the successful experiments of such major municipalities as Shanghai. From Asia to Africa to Europe to Latin America, countries are struggling to overcome entrenched secrecy and establish effective disclosure policies. More than seventy now have or are developing major disclosure policies or laws. But most of the world's nearly 200 nations do not have coherent disclosure laws; implementation of existing rules often proves difficult; and there is no consensus about what disclosure standards should apply to the increasingly powerful private sector. As governments and corporations battle with citizens and one another over the growing demand to submit their secrets to public scrutiny, they need new insights into whether, how, and when greater openness can serve the public interest, and how to bring about beneficial forms of greater disclosure. The Right to Know distills the lessons of many nations' often bitter experience and provides careful analysis of transparency's impact on governance, business regulation, environmental protection, and national security. Its powerful lessons make it a critical companion for policymakers, executives, and activists, as well as students and scholars seeking a better understanding of how to make information policy serve the public interest.

The Collapse of Fortress Bush

Author: Alasdair Roberts
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 9780814776254
Format: PDF, Mobi
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When the Bush presidency began to collapse, pundits were quick to tell a tale of the “imperial presidency” gone awry, a story of secretive, power-hungry ideologues who guided an arrogant president down the road to ruin. But the inside story of the failures of the Bush administration is both much more complex and alarming, says leading policy analyst Alasdair Roberts. In the most comprehensive, balanced view of the Bush presidency to date, Roberts portrays a surprisingly weak president, hamstrung by bureaucratic, constitutional, cultural and economic barriers and strikingly unable to wield authority even within his own executive branch. The Collapse of Fortress Bush shows how the president fought—and lost—key battles with the defense and intelligence communities. From Homeland Security to Katrina, Bush could not coordinate agencies to meet domestic threats or disasters. Either the Bush administration refused to exercise authority, was thwarted in the attempt to exercise authority, or wielded authority but could not meet the test of legitimacy needed to enact their goals. Ultimately, the vaunted White House discipline gave way to public recriminations among key advisers. Condemned for secretiveness, the Bush administration became one of the most closely scrutinized presidencies in the modern era. Roberts links the collapse of the Bush presidency to deeper currents in American politics and culture, especially a new militarism and the supremacy of the Reagan-era consensus on low taxes, limited government, and free markets. Only in this setting was it possible to have a “total war on terrorism” in which taxes were reduced, private consumption was encouraged, and businesses were lightly regulated. A balanced, incisive account by a skilled observer of U.S. government, The Collapse of Fortress Bush turns the spotlight from the powerful cabal that launched the war in Iraq to tell a much more disturbing story about American power and the failure of executive leadership.

The End of Protest

Author: Alasdair Roberts
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 080147003X
Format: PDF, Mobi
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The United States has just gone through the worst economic crisis in a generation. Why was there not more protest, as there was in other countries? During the United States’ last great era of free-market policies, before World War II, economic crises were always accompanied by unrest. “The history of capitalism,” the economist Joseph Schumpeter warned in 1942, “is studded with violent bursts and catastrophes.” In The End of Protest, Alasdair Roberts explains how, in the modern age, governments learned to unleash market forces while also avoiding protest about the market’s failures. Roberts argues that in the last three decades, the two countries that led the free-market revolution—the United States and Britain—have invented new strategies for dealing with unrest over free market policies. The organizing capacity of unions has been undermined so that it is harder to mobilize discontent. The mobilizing potential of new information technologies has also been checked. Police forces are bigger and better equipped than ever before. And technocrats in central banks have been given unprecedented power to avoid full-scale economic calamities. Tracing the histories of economic unrest in the United States and Great Britain from the nineteenth century to the present, The End of Protest shows that governments have always been preoccupied with the task of controlling dissent over free market policies. But today’s methods pose a new threat to democratic values. For the moment, advocates of free-market capitalism have found ways of controlling discontent, but the continued effectiveness of these strategies is by no means certain.

The Professionalization of Intelligence Cooperation

Author: A. Svendsen
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137269367
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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An insightful exploration of intelligence cooperation (officially known as liaison), including its international dimensions. This book offers a distinct understanding of this process, valuable to those involved in critical information flows, such as intelligence, risk, crisis and emergency managers.