Blood Ink

Author: Albert Borowitz
Publisher: Kent State University Press
ISBN: 9780873386937
Format: PDF, ePub
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The interplay between crime fact and crime fiction can be detected back to literature's earliest beginnings. True crime has long been the basis of many plots of memorable literature - from Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter to Jean Genet's play The Maids, there has often been blood on the page.

In the Wake of the Butcher

Author: James Jessen Badal
Publisher: Kent State University Press
ISBN: 9780873386890
Format: PDF, Mobi
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"In the Wake of the Butcher is based on police reports, autopsy protocols, personal interviews with the descendants of victims and investigators, and unpublished manuscripts and is illustrated with maps, rare crime scene and morgue photographs, and newspaper photos. The author dispels some long-held rumors about the crimes and confirms others. In the Wake of the Butcher presents its compelling case and leaves readers to come to their own conclusions about the notorious Cleveland murders."--BOOK JACKET.

The Oxford Handbook of Criminal Law

Author: Markus Dirk Dubber
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0199673594
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Providing scholars with a comprehensive international resource, a common point of entry into cutting edge contemporary research and a snapshot of the state and scope of the field, this Handbook takes a broad approach to its subject matter, disciplinarily, geographically, and systemically.

Law and Literature

Author: María José Falcón y Tella
Publisher: BRILL
ISBN: 9004304355
Format: PDF, Kindle
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María José Falcón y Tella invites us on a fascinating journey through the world of law and literature, travelling through the different eras and meeting eternal and as such current issues. Law in Literature is undoubtedly the most fertile and documented perspective of this book.

The Rise of True Crime 20th Century Murder and American Popular Culture

Author: Jean Murley
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 1573567728
Format: PDF, Mobi
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During the 1950s and 1960s True Detective magazine developed a new way of narrating and understanding murder. It was more sensitive to context, gave more psychologically sophisticated accounts, and was more willing to make conjectures about the unknown thoughts and motivations of killers than others had been before. This turned out to be the start of a revolution, and, after a century of escalating accounts, we have now become a nation of experts, with many ordinary people able to speak intelligently about blood-spatter patterns and organized vs. disorganized serial killers. The Rise of True Crime examines the various genres of true crime using the most popular and well-known examples. And despite its examination of some of the potentially negative effects of the genre, it is written for people who read and enjoy true crime, and wish to learn more about it. With skyrocketing crime rates and the appearance of a frightening trend toward social chaos in the 1970s, books, documentaries, and fiction films in the true crime genre tried to make sense of the Charles Manson crimes and the Gary Gilmore execution events. And in the 1980s and 1990s, true crime taught pop culture consumers about forensics, profiling, and highly technical aspects of criminology. We have thus now become a nation of experts, with many ordinary people able to speak intelligently about blood-spatter patterns and organized vs. disorganized serial killers. Through the suggestion that certain kinds of killers are monstrous or outside the realm of human morality, and through the perpetuation of the stranger-danger idea, the true crime aesthetic has both responded to and fostered our culture's fears. True crime is also the site of a dramatic confrontation with the concept of evil, and one of the few places in American public discourse where moral terms are used without any irony, and notions and definitions of evil are presented without ambiguity. When seen within its historical context, true crime emerges as a vibrant and meaningful strand of popular culture, one that is unfortunately devalued as lurid and meaningless pulp.

Victorians Against the Gallows

Author: James Gregory
Publisher: I.B.Tauris
ISBN: 0857730886
Format: PDF
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By the time that Queen Victoria ascended the throne in 1837, the list of crimes liable to attract the death penalty had effectively been reduced to murder. Yet, despite this, the gallows remained a source of controversy in Victorian Britain and there was a growing unease in liberal quarters surrounding the question of capital punishment. In this book, James Gregory examines organised efforts to abolish capital punishment in Britain and the Empire in the Victorian era, focusing particularly on the activities of the Society for the Abolition of Capital Punishment. The amelioration of the notoriously ‘Bloody Code’ of the British state may have limited capital punishment effectively to a small number of murderers after 1840 but, despite this, capital punishment was a matter of perennial debate, from the local arena of school debating societies to the ‘imperial Parliament’, and a topic to trouble the minds of thoughtful Victorians across the British world. Drawing on a wide range of sources, from pamphlets by abolitionists or their opponents to gallows broadsides, official inquiries, provincial newspapers, novels and short stories, Gregory studies a movement acknowledged by contemporaries to be agitating one of the ‘questions of the day’ - challenging as it did contemporary theology, state infliction of violence, and prevalent ideas about punishment. He explores important aspects such as: capital punishment debates in the ‘Lex Britannica’ of British colonies and dominions, the role of women abolitionists and the class and gendered inflexions to the ‘gallows question’, the representation of the problem of capital punishment in Victorian fiction, and the relationship between abolitionists and the Home Office which exercised the royal prerogative of mercy. While the abolitionism of Nonconformist reformers such as the Quakers and Unitarians is familiar, Gregory introduces the reader to the abolitionist debates in Jewish, secularist and spiritualist circles, and explores themes such as the imagined role of the Queen as ‘fount of mercy’ and the disturbing figure of the hangman. Studying the provincial, national and international aspects to the movement, Victorians Against the Gallows offers an important contribution to our understanding of Victorian reform activities, and Victorian culture.

Terrorism for Self glorification

Author: Albert Borowitz
Publisher: Kent State University Press
ISBN: 9780873388184
Format: PDF, Kindle
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"The study of terrorism requires interdisciplinary inquiry. Proving that terrorism cannot be the exclusive focus of a single field of scholarship, Borowitz presents this complex subject using sources based in religion, philosophy, history, Greek mythology, and world literature, including works of Chaucer, Cervantes, Mark Twain, and Jean-Paul Sartre." "Written in clear and direct prose, Terrorism for Self-Glorification is original, thorough, and thought provoking. Scholars, specialists, and general readers will find this study of terrorism fascinating and illuminating."--BOOK JACKET.

The Old Religion in a New World

Author: Mark A. Noll
Publisher: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing
ISBN: 9780802849489
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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With some exceptions, Noll (Christian thought, Wheaton College, Illinois) focuses on the chronological development of Christianity in the United States, although he does include a comparative chapter on Canada and Mexico. Synthesizing the work of other scholars, Noll describes the activities and bel