Boston Light

Author: Sally R. Snowman
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 1439657157
Format: PDF, Docs
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On September 14, 1716, Boston Light became the first lighthouse established in Colonial America. With many ships floundering in the treacherous waters of the Massachusetts harbor, there was a great need for navigational aid. At night and during storms, it was difficult to discern the entrance to the main shipping channel of Nantasket Roads, situated between the Brewster islands and the town of Hull. The ledges had become a graveyard for ships, resulting in great loss to human life and cargo—a deterrent to European colonization efforts. Ship captains and merchants petitioned the colonial government for a lighthouse to be erected on Little Brewster Island as a way of safe passage to the inner harbor. Three hundred years later, Boston Light continues to serve its purpose. Today, the lighthouse is protected by an ever-present Coast Guard civilian keeper and a cadre of specially trained Coast Guard Auxiliary volunteer assistant keepers.

Boston Light

Author: Aileen Weintraub
Publisher: The Rosen Publishing Group, Inc
ISBN: 9780823961702
Format: PDF
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War has not been kind to Boston Light. During the American Revolution, the lighthouse was blown up and a new one had to be built. The lighthouse was also affected by wars in later years. Its lights were dimmed or put out in WWI and WWII so that enemy troops would not be guided by its beam.

Boston s South End

Author: Anthony Mitchell Sammarco
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 9780738534701
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Originally a narrow, barren strip of land known as the Neck, Boston's South End grew from a lonely sentry post and execution grounds to what is today the largest Victorian neighborhood in the United States. With the filling of the South Cove in the 1830s, the area became one of the greatest planned residential districts of its time, a heritage preserved in unique architectural features such as red brick swell bay facades, elaborate balusters, and fanciful porches.

America s Lighthouses

Author: Francis Ross Holland
Publisher: Courier Corporation
ISBN: 9780486255767
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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A history of the lighthouse which examines its technical development in the United States

Boston Police Department

Author: Donna M. Wells
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 9780738513027
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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The Boston Police Department was formally organized in 1854, but the department traces its origins to the establishment of a night watch of six men and an officer in 1631. At a town meeting in 1701, watchmen were instructed to be "on duty from ten o'clock till broad daylight. . . . They are to go about silently with watch bills, not using any bell, and no watchman to smoke tobacco while walking their rounds; and when they see occasion, to call to persons to take care of their light." Today, the duties of the Boston police officer are supported by advanced forensic technologies and modern equipment. Officers walk neighborhood beats, control local crime, and are ready at a moment's notice to respond to acts of terrorism. Boston Police Department, the first comprehensive photographic history of the department, details one hundred fifty years of crime fighting in Boston. The collection includes images of the 1919 Boston Police Strike; an overview of specialized units, vehicles, uniforms, and equipment; and an honor roll of officers who have fallen in the line of duty.

Das Bild der Stadt

Author: Kevin Lynch
Publisher: Birkhäuser
ISBN: 3035602166
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Wie orientieren wir uns in einer Stadt? Woher rühren unsere ganz fest umrissenen visuellen Vorstellungen? Um diese Fragen beantworten zu können, studierte Kevin Lynch die Erfahrungen von Menschen und zeigt damit, wie man das Bild der Stadt wieder lebendiger und einprägsamer machen könnte.

Lighthouses of New England

Author: Jon Marcus
Publisher: Voyageur Press (MN)
ISBN: 9780896584846
Format: PDF, Docs
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This is both a history and a tour guide illustrating the development of lighthouses in the region. Included are excerpts from original logs and a descriptive tour of the last manned lighthouse in America--Boston Light--with its three resident Coast Guardsmen and their dog. Color photos.

Hull and Nantasket Beach

Author: Committee for the Preservation of Hull's History
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 9780738503189
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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This delightful and nostalgic pictorial history tells the story of Hull, Massachusetts, as it evolved from a quiet, remote seafaring village into a thriving community and resort. Home of world-famous Nantasket Beach, this 7-mile peninsula is rich with a history that includes maritime traditions, technological advances, and celebrated personalities. Through these fascinating images collected by the Committee for the Preservation of Hull's History, we learn about the unique heritage of this flourishing summer resort town. Visitors view Hull as a wonderful vacation paradise, but it is also a progressive community of firsts. North America's first lighthouse and the first U.S. electric railroad were both built in Hull. The area is also the site of the famous amusement park, Paragon Park, which was opened in 1905 and was considered comparable to the World's Fair. Through the 1950s, steamboats, trains, and famous hotels brought millions of visitors to Hull, making it one of the area's premier tourist destinations. During the later part of the 20th century, Hull has been ardently re-establishing its links to the past while growing and prospering, as more people discover this jewel of the region as a place to visit or reside. In Hull and Nantasket Beach, the authors invite you to join them on an exciting journey through an area rich with historic hotels and beaches, maritime and military history, technological advances, famous visitors, and proud residents.

Yankee Theatre

Author: Francis Hodge
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 0292761546
Format: PDF, ePub
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The famous "Stage Yankees," with their eccentric New England dialect comedy, entertained audiences from Boston to New Orleans, from New York to London in the years between 1825 and 1850. They provided the creative energy for the development of an American-type character in early plays of native authorship. This book examines the full range of their theatre activity, not only as actors, but also as playmakers, and re-evaluates their contribution to the growth of the American stage. Yankee theatre was not an oddity, a passing fad, or an accident of entertainment; it was an honest exploitation of the materials of American life for an audience in search of its own identification. The delineation of the American character—a full-length realistic portrait in the context of stage comedy—was its projected goal; and though not the only method for such delineation, the theatre form was the most popular and extensive way of disseminating the American image. The Yankee actors openly borrowed from what literary sources were available to them, but because of their special position as actors, who were required to give flesh-and-blood imitations of people for the believable acceptance of others viewing the same people about them, they were forced to draw extensively on their actors' imaginations and to present the American as they saw him. If the image was too often an external one, it still revealed the Yankee as a hardy individual whose independence was a primary assumption; as a bargainer, whose techniques were more clever than England's sharpest penny-pincher; as a country person, more intelligent, sharper and keener in dealings than the city-bred type; as an American freewheeler who always landed on top, not out of naive honesty but out of a simple perception of other human beings and their gullibility. Much new evidence in this study is based on London productions, where the view of English audiences and critics was sharply focused on what Americans thought about themselves and the new culture of democracy emerging around them. The shift from America, the borrower, to America, the original doer, can be clearly seen in this stager activity. Yankee theatre, then, is an epitome of the emerging American after the Second War for Independence. Emerging nationalism meant emerging national definition. Yankee theatre thus led to the first cohesive body of American plays, the first American actors seen in London, and to a new realistic interpretation of the American in the "character" plays of the 1870s and 1880s.