California and Great Basin Olivella Shell Bead Guide

Author: Randall T Milliken
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1315432528
Format: PDF, Docs
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Olivella shell beads are ubiquitous at Central California Indian sites and were traded far inland by the local inhabitants. Their distinctive patterns of manufacture provide archaeologists with important chronological, morphological, and distributional information. This guide—authored by a professional artifact replicator and an archaeological expert on shell bead typology-- offers a well developed 16-category typology, including the descriptive, temporal, and metric characteristics of each style, illustrated with almost 200 color photographs. Spiral bound to facilitate field and laboratory work, it is an essential tool for conducting archaeology in the American west. Sponsored by the Society for California Archaeology and Pacific Legacy, Inc.

A Field Guide to Conservation Archaeology in North America

Author: Georgess McHargue
Publisher: Book Sales
ISBN:
Format: PDF, ePub
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Provides the amateur with all necessary information on and essential instruction in the techniques and purposes of archaeological fieldwork, emphasizing the preservation of evidence in even the smallest site

Traders and Raiders

Author: Natale A. Zappia
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469615851
Format: PDF
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The Colorado River region looms large in the history of the American West, vitally important in the designs and dreams of Euro-Americans since the first Spanish journey up the river in the sixteenth century. But as Natale A. Zappia argues in this expansive study, the Colorado River basin must be understood first as home to a complex Indigenous world. Through 300 years of western colonial settlement, Spaniards, Mexicans, and Americans all encountered vast Indigenous borderlands peopled by Mojaves, Quechans, Southern Paiutes, Utes, Yokuts, and others, bound together by political, economic, and social networks. Examining a vast cultural geography including southern California, Nevada, Utah, Arizona, Sonora, Baja California, and New Mexico, Zappia shows how this interior world pulsated throughout the centuries before and after Spanish contact, solidifying to create an autonomous, interethnic Indigenous space that expanded and adapted to an ever-encroaching global market economy. Situating the Colorado River basin firmly within our understanding of Indian country, Traders and Raiders investigates the borders and borderlands created during this period, connecting the coastlines of the Atlantic and Pacific worlds with a vast Indigenous continent.