Canoeing the Boundary Waters Wilderness

Author: Stephen Wilbers
Publisher: History Press (SC)
ISBN: 9781609497323
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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We quake to the haunting calls of loons and wolves, gape at the shimmering curtains of the northern lights, look expectantly for the iconic moose. But the richest and most engaging qualities of Wilbers' memoir are its social scenes. Far from being alone in the wilderness, he is surrounded by family and friends. —Greg Breining, author of Paddle North: Canoeing the Boundary Waters–Quetico WildernessThis is a deeply personal, yet universal story. Stephen Wilbers keenly observes nature, within the wilderness and within the human heart. A well-told memoir that is funny, poignant and ultimately profound.—Bill Hansen, Sawbill Canoe Outfitters This second volume…takes on true form and meaning because of Eddy, the author's son, whom we watch grow from age four (baby toads in the water jugs) to a tall twenty-two who makes the wilderness his own at every turn. It is through Eddy that we feel the movement of time, through his humor and antics that we love our own children even more.—Beth Waterhouse, Executive director, Ernest Oberholtzer Foundation

A Boundary Waters History

Author: Stephen Wilbers
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 1625841892
Format: PDF
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Teasing out the history of a place celebrated for timelessness—where countless paddle strokes have disappeared into clear waters—requires a sure and attentive hand. Stephen Wilbers’s account reaches back to the glaciers that first carved out the Boundary Waters and to the original inhabitants, as well as to generations of wilderness explorers, both past and present. He does so without losing the personal relationship built through a lifetime of pilgrimages (anchored by almost three decades of trips with his father). This story captures the untold broader narrative of the region, as well as a thousand different details sure to be recognized by fellow pilgrims, like the grinding rhythm of a long portage or the loon call that slips into that last moment before sleep.

A Year in the Wilderness

Author: Amy Freeman
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781571313713
Format: PDF, Docs
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From National Geographic's 2014 Adventurers of the Year, a beautifully illustrated account of a year in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness

Sawbill

Author: Jennifer Case
Publisher: University of New Mexico Press
ISBN: 0826359493
Format: PDF, Mobi
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In Sawbill Jennifer Case watches her family suddenly exchange their rooted existence for a series of relocations that take them across the United States. In response Case struggles to “live in place” without a geographical home, a struggle that leads her to search for grounding in the now-dismantled fishing resort her grandparents ran in northeastern Minnesota. By chronicling her migratory adulthood alongside the similarly unpredictable history of Sawbill Lodge, this memoir offers a resonant meditation on home, family, environment, and the human desire for place in the inherently mobile twenty-first century.

Boundary Waters Canoe Area Western Region

Author: Robert Beymer
Publisher: Wilderness Press
ISBN: 9780899976105
Format: PDF, Mobi
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With thousands of lakes and streams, over 1200 miles of canoe routes, 160 miles of portage trails, and 2000 campsites, the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness is a true paddler's paradise. Extending nearly 150 miles in northern Minnesota along the Canadian border, the wilderness area encompasses more than 1 million acres. This Western Region edition of the classic two-volume guide has been fully updated by area journalist Louis Dzierzak, with full coverage of 50-plus entry points and routes. Trip descriptions include day-by-day paddling distances, portage tips, and difficulty ratings, and identify the appropriate water-resistant, topographic maps W.A. Fisher maps for each trip. Together, these books deliver everything a visitor needs for the experience of a lifetime.

Forests for the People

Author: Christopher Johnson
Publisher: Island Press
ISBN: 1610912152
Format: PDF, ePub
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Forests for the People tells one of the most extraordinary stories of environmental protection in our nation’s history: how a diverse coalition of citizens, organizations, and business and political leaders worked to create a system of national forests in the Eastern United States. It offers an insightful and wide-ranging look at the actions leading to the passage of the Weeks Act in 1911—landmark legislation that established a system of well-managed forests in the East, the South, and the Great Lakes region—along with case studies that consider some of the key challenges facing eastern forests today. The book begins by looking at destructive practices widely used by the timber industry in the late 1800s and early 1900s, including extensive clearcutting followed by forest fire that devastated entire landscapes. The authors explain how this led to the birth of a new conservation movement that began simultaneously in the Southern Appalachians and New England, and describe the subsequent protection of forests in New England (New Hampshire and the White Mountains); the Great Lakes region (Michigan, Wisconsin, and Minnesota), and the Southern Appalachians. Following this historical background, the authors offer eight case studies that examine critical issues facing the eastern national forests today, including timber harvesting, the use of fire, wilderness protection, endangered wildlife, oil shale drilling, invasive species, and development surrounding national park borders. Forests for the People is the only book to fully describe the history of the Weeks Act and the creation of the eastern national forests and to use case studies to illustrate current management issues facing these treasured landscapes. It is an important new work for anyone interested in the past or future of forests and forestry in the United States.

A Boundary Waters History

Author: Stephen Wilbers
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 1625841892
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Download Now
Teasing out the history of a place celebrated for timelessness—where countless paddle strokes have disappeared into clear waters—requires a sure and attentive hand. Stephen Wilbers’s account reaches back to the glaciers that first carved out the Boundary Waters and to the original inhabitants, as well as to generations of wilderness explorers, both past and present. He does so without losing the personal relationship built through a lifetime of pilgrimages (anchored by almost three decades of trips with his father). This story captures the untold broader narrative of the region, as well as a thousand different details sure to be recognized by fellow pilgrims, like the grinding rhythm of a long portage or the loon call that slips into that last moment before sleep.