Changes in the Land

Author: William Cronon
Publisher: Hill and Wang
ISBN: 142992828X
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Winner of the Francis Parkman Prize Changes in the Land offers an original and persuasive interpretation of the changing circumstances in New England's plant and animal communities that occurred with the shift from Indian to European dominance. With the tools of both historian and ecologist, Cronon constructs an interdisciplinary analysis of how the land and the people influenced one another, and how that complex web of relationships shaped New England's communities.

Changes in the Land Revised Edition

Author: William Cronon
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 0809016346
Format: PDF, Kindle
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[This book offers an] interpretation of the changing circumstances in New England's plant and animal communities that occurred with the shift from Indian to European dominance. [In the book, the author] constructs [an] interdisciplinary analysis of how the land and the people influenced one another, and how that complex web of relationships shaped New England's communities.-Back cover.

Changes in the Land

Author: William Cronon
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 0809034050
Format: PDF
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This book offers an original and persuasive interpretation of the changing circumstances in New England's plant and animal communities that occurred with the shift from Indian to European dominance.

Ecological Revolutions

Author: Carolyn Merchant
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 9780807899625
Format: PDF, ePub
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With the arrival of European explorers and settlers during the seventeenth century, Native American ways of life and the environment itself underwent radical alterations as human relationships to the land and ways of thinking about nature all changed. This colonial ecological revolution held sway until the nineteenth century, when New England's industrial production brought on a capitalist revolution that again remade the ecology, economy, and conceptions of nature in the region. In Ecological Revolutions, Carolyn Merchant analyzes these two major transformations in the New England environment between 1600 and 1860. In a preface to the second edition, Merchant introduces new ideas about narrating environmental change based on gender and the dialectics of transformation, while the revised epilogue situates New England in the context of twenty-first-century globalization and climate change. Merchant argues that past ways of relating to the land could become an inspiration for renewing resources and achieving sustainability in the future.

Nature s Metropolis Chicago and the Great West

Author: William Cronon
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393072452
Format: PDF, Docs
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A Finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and Winner of the Bancroft Prize. "No one has written a better book about a city…Nature's Metropolis is elegant testimony to the proposition that economic, urban, environmental, and business history can be as graceful, powerful, and fascinating as a novel." —Kenneth T. Jackson, Boston Globe In this groundbreaking work, William Cronon gives us an environmental perspective on the history of nineteenth-century America. By exploring the ecological and economic changes that made Chicago America's most dynamic city and the Great West its hinterland, Mr. Cronon opens a new window onto our national past. This is the story of city and country becoming ever more tightly bound in a system so powerful that it reshaped the American landscape and transformed American culture. The world that emerged is our own. Winner of the Chicago Tribune Heartland Prize

Indian New England Before the Mayflower

Author: Howard S. Russell
Publisher: University Press of New England
ISBN: 1611686369
Format: PDF, Kindle
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In offering here a highly readable yet comprehensive description of New England's Indians as they lived when European settlers first met them, the author provides a well-rounded picture of the natives as neither savages nor heroes, but fellow human beings existing at a particular time and in a particular environment. He dispels once and for all the common notion of native New England as peopled by a handful of savages wandering in a trackless wilderness. In sketching the picture the author has had help from such early explorers as Verrazano, Champlain, John Smith, and a score of literate sailors; Pilgrims and Puritans; settlers, travelers, military men, and missionaries. A surprising number of these took time and trouble to write about the new land and the characteristics and way of life of its native people. A second major background source has been the patient investigations of modern archaeologists and scientists, whose several enthusiastic organizations sponsor physical excavations and publications that continually add to our perception of prehistoric men and women, their habits, and their environment. This account of the earlier New Englanders, of their land and how they lived in it and treated it; their customs, food, life, means of livelihood, and philosophy of life will be of interest to all general audiences concerned with the history of Native Americans and of New England.

New England s Prospect

Author: William Wood
Publisher: Univ of Massachusetts Press
ISBN: 9780870238901
Format: PDF, ePub
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Nature Incorporated

Author: Theodore Steinberg
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521527118
Format: PDF, ePub
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A reinterpretation of industrialization that centres on the struggle to control and master nature.

Land of Sunshine

Author: William Deverell
Publisher: University of Pittsburgh Pre
ISBN: 9780822959397
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Most people equate Los Angeles with smog, sprawl, forty suburbs in search of a city-the great "what-not-to-do" of twentieth-century city building. But there's much more to LA's story than this shallow stereotype. History shows that Los Angeles was intensely, ubiquitously planned. The consequences of that planning-the environmental history of urbanism--is one place to turn for the more complex lessons LA has to offer. Working forward from ancient times and ancient ecologies to the very recent past, Land of Sunshine is a fascinating exploration of the environmental history of greater Los Angeles. Rather than rehearsing a litany of errors or insults against nature, rather than decrying the lost opportunities of "roads not taken," these essays, by nineteen leading geologists, ecologists, and historians, instead consider the changing dynamics both of the city and of nature. In the nineteenth century, for example, "density" was considered an evil, and reformers struggled mightily to move the working poor out to areas where better sanitation and flowers and parks "made life seem worth the living." We now call that vision "sprawl," and we struggle just as much to bring middle-class people back into the core of American cities. There's nothing natural, or inevitable, about such turns of events. It's only by paying very close attention to the ways metropolitan nature has been constructed and construed that meaningful lessons can be drawn. History matters. So here are the plants and animals of the Los Angeles basin, its rivers and watersheds. Here are the landscapes of fact and fantasy, the historical actors, events, and circumstances that have proved transformative over and over again. The result is a nuanced and rich portrait of Los Angeles that will serve planners, communities, and environmentalists as they look to the past for clues, if not blueprints, for enhancing the quality and viability of cities.

New England Frontier

Author: Alden T. Vaughan
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
ISBN: 9780806127187
Format: PDF, Kindle
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In contrast to most accounts of Puritan-Indian relations, "New England Frontier "argues that the first two generations of""Puritan settlers were neither generally hostile toward their""Indian neighbors nor indifferent to their territorial rights.""Rather, American Puritans-especially their political and""religious leaders-sought peaceful and equitable relations""as the first step in molding the Indians into neo-Englishmen.""When accumulated Indian resentments culminated in the""war of 1675, however, the relatively benign intercultural""contact of the preceding fifty-five-year period rapidly declined.""With a new introduction updating developments in""Puritan-Indian studies in the last fifteen years, this third""edition affords the reader a clear, balanced overview of a""complex and sensitive area of American history.""