Cherokee Women

Author: Theda Perdue
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 9780803235861
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Theda Perdue examines the roles and responsibilities of Cherokee women during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, a time of intense cultural change. While building on the research of earlier historians, she develops a uniquely complex view of the effects of contact on Native gender relations, arguing that Cherokee conceptions of gender persisted long after contact. Maintaining traditional gender roles actually allowed Cherokee women and men to adapt to new circumstances and adopt new industries and practices.

Cherokee Women

Author: Theda Perdue
Publisher:
ISBN:
Format: PDF
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In a landmark study, historian Theda Perdue examines the roles and responsibilities of Cherokee women during the 18th and 19th centuries, a time of intense cultural change. Perdue shows that the strength of their traditions empowered the Cherokee to resist changes, including pressure from the federal government to relinquish tribal lands.

Cherokee Women

Author: Theda Perdue
Publisher: Bison Books
ISBN: 9780803287600
Format: PDF
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Theda Perdue examines the roles and responsibilities of Cherokee women during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, a time of intense cultural change. While building on the research of earlier historians, she develops a uniquely complex view of the effects of contact on Native gender relations, arguing that Cherokee conceptions of gender persisted long after contact. Maintaining traditional gender roles actually allowed Cherokee women and men to adapt to new circumstances and adopt new industries and practices.

Cherokee Americans

Author: John R. Finger
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 9780803268791
Format: PDF
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Finger is a descendant of the tribal remnant that avoided removal in the 1830s and instead remained in North Carolina. Most now live on a reservation adjacent to Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

North American Indians A Very Short Introduction

Author: Theda Perdue
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199746101
Format: PDF, Kindle
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When Europeans first arrived in North America, between five and eight million indigenous people were already living there. But how did they come to be here? What were their agricultural, spiritual, and hunting practices? How did their societies evolve and what challenges do they face today? Eminent historians Theda Perdue and Michael Green begin by describing how nomadic bands of hunter-gatherers followed the bison and woolly mammoth over the Bering land mass between Asia and what is now Alaska between 25,000 and 15,000 years ago, settling throughout North America. They describe hunting practices among different tribes, how some made the gradual transition to more settled, agricultural ways of life, the role of kinship and cooperation in Native societies, their varied burial rites and spiritual practices, and many other features of Native American life. Throughout the book, Perdue and Green stress the great diversity of indigenous peoples in America, who spoke more than 400 different languages before the arrival of Europeans and whose ways of life varied according to the environments they settled in and adapted to so successfully. Most importantly, the authors stress how Native Americans have struggled to maintain their sovereignty--first with European powers and then with the United States--in order to retain their lands, govern themselves, support their people, and pursue practices that have made their lives meaningful. Going beyond the stereotypes that so often distort our views of Native Americans, this Very Short Introduction offers a historically accurate, deeply engaging, and often inspiring account of the wide array of Native peoples in America. About the Series: Combining authority with wit, accessibility, and style, Very Short Introductions offer an introduction to some of life's most interesting topics. Written by experts for the newcomer, they demonstrate the finest contemporary thinking about the central problems and issues in hundreds of key topics, from philosophy to Freud, quantum theory to Islam.

Cherokee Renascence in the New Republic

Author: William Gerald McLoughlin
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9780691006277
Format: PDF, Mobi
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The Cherokees, the most important tribe in the formative years of the American Republic, became the test case for the Founding Fathers' determination to Christianize and "civilize" all Indians and to incorporate them into the republic as full citizens. From the standpoint of the Cherokees, rather than from that of the white policymakers, William McLoughlin tells the dramatic success story of the "renascence" of the tribe. He goes on to give a full account of how the Cherokees eventually fell before the expansionism of white America and the zeal of Andrew Jackson. "This is more than a chronicle of events in Cherokee history during this decisive period, although the material covered here has not been better treated before. McLoughlin includes not only the tribe's relations with the federal government but also the internal divisions that seemed likely to split the nation on several occasions."--Gary E. Moulton, American Historical Review "A masterfully crafted, meticulously documented analysis of Cherokee acculturation between 1794 and 1833."--Mary Young, Journal of the Early Republic

Gender and Sexuality in Indigenous North America 1400 1850

Author: Sandra Slater
Publisher: Univ of South Carolina Press
ISBN: 1611172039
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Prior to the arrival of Europeans in the New World, Native Americans across the continent had developed richly complex attitudes and forms of expression concerning gender and sexual roles. The role of the "berdache," a man living as a woman or a woman living as a man in native societies, has received recent scholarly attention but represents just one of many such occurrences of alternative gender identification in these cultures. Editors Sandra Slater and Fay A. Yarbrough have brought together scholars who explore the historical implications of these variations in the meanings of gender, sexuality, and marriage among indigenous communities in North America. Essays that span from the colonial period through the nineteenth century illustrate how these aspects of Native American life were altered through interactions with Europeans. Organized chronologically, Gender and Sexuality in Indigenous North America, 1400–1850 probes gender identification, labor roles, and political authority within Native American societies. The essays are linked by overarching examinations of how Europeans manipulated native ideas about gender for their own ends and how indigenous people responded to European attempts to impose gendered cultural practices at odds with established traditions. Representing groundbreaking scholarship in the field of Native American studies, these insightful discussions of gender, sexuality, and identity advance our understanding of cultural traditions and clashes that continue to resonate in native communities today as well as in the larger societies those communities exist within.

Cherokee Women In Crisis

Author: Carolyn Johnston
Publisher: University of Alabama Press
ISBN: 081735056X
Format: PDF, Mobi
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"American Indian women have traditionally played vital roles in social heirarchies, including at the family, clan, and tribal levels. In the Cherokee Nation, specifically, women and men are considered equal contributors to the culture. With this study we learn that three key historical events in the 19th and early 20th centuries-removal, the Civil War, and allotment of their lands-forced a radical renegotiation of gender roles and relations in Cherokee society."--Back cover.

The Cherokee Nation and the Trail of Tears

Author: Theda Perdue
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9780670031504
Format: PDF
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Documents the 1830s policy shift of the U.S. government through which it discontinued efforts to assimilate Native Americans in favor of forcibly relocating them west of the Mississippi, in an account that traces the decision's specific effect on the Cherokee Nation, U.S.-Indian relations, and contemporary society.