Circulation Writing and Rhetoric

Author: Laurie Gries
Publisher: University Press of Colorado
ISBN: 1607326744
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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While it has long been understood that the circulation of discourse, bodies, artifacts, and ideas plays an important constitutive force in our cultures and communities, circulation, as a concept and a phenomenon, has been underexamined in studies of rhetoric and writing. In an effort to give circulation its rhetorical due, Circulation, Writing, and Rhetoric introduces a wide range of studies that foreground circulation in both theory and practice. Contributors to the volume specifically explore the connections between circulation and public rhetorics, urban studies, feminist rhetorics, digital communication, new materialism, and digital research. Circulation is a cultural-rhetorical process that impacts various ecologies, communities, and subjectivities in an ever-increasing globally networked environment. As made evident in this collection, circulation occurs in all forms of discursive production, from academic arguments to neoliberal policies to graffiti to tweets and bitcoins. Even in the case of tombstones, borrowed text achieves only partial stability before it is recirculated and transformed again. This communicative process is even more evident in the digital realm, the underlying infrastructures of which we have yet to fully understand. As public spaces become more and more saturated with circulating texts and images and as networked relations come to the center of rhetorical focus, Circulation, Writing, and Rhetoric will be a vital interdisciplinary resource for approaching the contemporary dynamics of rhetoric and writing. Contributors: Aaron Beveridge, Casey Boyle, Jim Brown, Naomi Clark, Dànielle Nicole DeVoss, Rebecca Dingo, Sidney I. Dobrin, Jay Dolmage, Dustin Edwards, Jessica Enoch, Tarez Samra Graban, Byron Hawk, Gerald Jackson, Gesa E. Kirsch, Heather Lang, Sean Morey, Jenny Rice, Thomas Rickert, Jim Ridolfo, Nathaniel A. Rivers, Jacqueline Jones Royster, Donnie Johnson Sackey, Michele Simmons, Dale M. Smith, Patricia Sullivan, John Tinnell, Kathleen Blake Yancey

Economies of Writing

Author: Bruce Horner
Publisher: University Press of Colorado
ISBN: 1607325233
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Economies of Writing advances scholarship on political economies of writing and writing instruction, considering them in terms of course subject, pedagogy, technology, and social practice. Taking the "economic" as a necessary point of departure and contention for the field, the collection insists that writing concerns are inevitably participants in political markets in their consideration of forms of valuation, production, and circulation of knowledge with labor and with capital. Approaching the economic as plural, contingent, and political, chapters explore complex forces shaping the production and valuation of literacies, languages, identities, and institutions and consider their implications for composition scholarship, teaching, administration, and public rhetorics. Chapters engage a range of issues, including knowledge transfer, cyberpublics, graduate writing courses, and internationalized web domains. Economies of Writing challenges dominant ideologies of writing, writing skills, writing assessment, language, writing technology, and public rhetoric by revealing the complex and shifting valuations of writing practices as they circulate within and across different economies. The volume is a significant contribution to rhetoric and composition’s understanding of and ways to address its seemingly perennial unease about its own work. Contributors: Anis Bawarshi, Deborah Brandt, Jenn Fishman, T. R. Johnson, Jay Jordan, Kacie Kiser, Steve Lamos, Donna LeCourt, Rebecca Lorimer Leonard, Samantha Looker, Katie Malcolm, Paul Kei Matsuda, Joan Mullin, Jason Peters, Christian J. Pulver, Kelly Ritter, Phyllis Mentzell Ryder, Tony Scott, Scott Wible, Yuching Jill Yang, James T. Zebroski

Still Life with Rhetoric

Author: Laurie Gries
Publisher: University Press of Colorado
ISBN: 0874219787
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Winner of the 2016 CCCC Advancement of Knowledge Award and the 2016 CCCC Research Impact Award In Still Life with Rhetoric, Laurie Gries forges connections among new materialism, actor network theory, and rhetoric to explore how images become rhetorically active in a digitally networked, global environment. Rather than study how an already-materialized “visual text” functions within a specific context, Gries investigates how images often circulate and transform across media, genre, and location at viral rates. A four-part case study of Shepard Fairey’s now iconic Obama Hope image elucidates how images reassemble collective life as they actualize in different versions, enter into various relations, and spark a firework of activity across the globe. While intent on tracking the rhetorical life of a single, multiple image, Still Life with Rhetoric is most concerned with studying rhetoric in motion. To account for an image’s widespread circulation and emergent activities, Gries introduces iconographic tracking—a digital research method for tracing an image’s divergent rhetorical becomings. Yet Gries also articulates a dynamic set of theoretical principles for studying rhetoric as a distributed, generative, and unforeseeable event that is applicable beyond the study of visual rhetoric. With an eye toward futurity—the strands of time beyond a thing’s initial moment of production and delivery—Still Life with Rhetoric intends to be taken up by those interested in visual rhetoric, research methods, and theory.

Circulating Communities

Author: Paula Mathieu
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 0739167103
Format: PDF, Docs
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Circulating Communities: The Tactics and Strategies of Community Publishing, edited by Paula Mathieu, Steve Parks, and Tiffany Rousculp, represents the first attempt to gather the myriad of community and college publishing projects, providing not only history and analysis but extended samples of the community writing produced. Rather than feature only the voices of academic scholars, this collection features also the words of writing group participants, community organizers, literacy instructors, librarians, and stay-at-home parents as well. In libraries, community centers, prisons, and homeless shelters across the US and around the world, people not traditionally understood as writers regularly come together to write, offer feedback, revise, publish and most importantly circulate their words. The vast amount of literature that these community-publishing projects create has historically been overlooked by scholars of literature, journalism, and literacy. Over the past decade, however, higher education has moved outward, off campus and into the streets. Many of these efforts build from writing and publication projects that extend back over decades, are grassroots in nature, and are independent of college efforts. Circulating Communities offers a unique glimpse into how neighbor and scholar, teacher and activist, are using writing and publishing to improve the daily lives on the streets they call home."

Digital Rhetoric

Author: Douglas Eyman
Publisher: University of Michigan Press
ISBN: 0472052683
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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A survey of a range of disciplines whose practitioners are venturing into the new field of digital rhetoric, examining the history of the ways digital and networked technologies inhabit and shape traditional rhetorical practices as well as considering new rhetorics made possible by current technologies

Rhetorics for Community Action

Author: Phyllis Mentzell Ryder
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 0739137689
Format: PDF
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Offering both theoretical analysis and classroom advice, Rhetorics for Community Action: Public Writing and Writing Publics, by Phyllis Mentzell Ryder, is a guide to studying and teaching public writing. The book shows how public groups embed competing democratic ideals into the rhetorical structures of their texts, how they work with and against traditional media to spread those ideals, and how teachers can partner with community organizations and support students as they practice public writing in all its complexity.

Early Modern Women s Writing and the Rhetoric of Modesty

Author: P. Pender
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137008016
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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An in-depth study of early modern women's modesty rhetoric from the English Reformation to the Restoration. This book provides new readings of modesty's gendered deployment in the works of Anne Askew, Katharine Parr, Mary Sidney, Aemilia Lanyer and Anne Bradstreet.

Writing Spaces and Places

Author: Charles Notto Lesh
Publisher:
ISBN:
Format: PDF, Docs
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As its central and motivating claim, this dissertation argues that writing makes space. Through an ethnographic examination of graffiti writing in Boston and the various social spaces it produces-the blackbook, the city, and the train-my work here is intended to alert scholars of writing and rhetoric to the ways in which rhetorical activity not only exists in space, requires space, and negotiates space, but also makes spaces that promote, facilitate, and limit particular assemblages of social relations. While previous work in rhetoric and composition has persuasively argued that space informs, shapes, and produces (the conditions for) writing, I argue in this dissertation that writing informs, shapes, and produces space. I contend that graffiti writing provides an instructive example of the ways in which communities of writers use resources available to them to alter their spatial realities and challenge larger spatial processes. Through close ethnographic work with graffiti writers, I demonstrate how communities of writers-particularly those with limited spaces for rhetorical work-must think in terms of spatial production as well as spatial impact and negotiation. Graffiti writing provides a rich example of this rhetorical spatial production: a community of writers working to produce alternative spatial experiences within spaces and places designed to erase, marginalize, or eradicate their textual engagements. While my work here deals directly with graffiti writing in Boston, I believe that my emphasis on the spatial production of writing has implications for a range of conversations in the field, apart from its more obvious connections to work on space and place. In each chapter, I work through how this orientation towards the study of writing challenges and supplements disciplinary thinking on a range of topics that, while ostensibly discrete, are brought into contact through an examination of their connections to spatially productive writing. In an attempt to think through the rhetorical work of graffiti writing in Boston, I pull from, and intervene in, a range of disciplinary conversations, including ethnography and methodology (Chapter 1), Rhetorical Genre Studies (Chapter 2), publics and public writing (Chapter 3), and circulation and mobility (Chapter 4). The glue that holds these varied interventions together is a new approach to the study of writing that requires an examination of texts and the social spaces they produce, and how this refigured relationship to writing reorients the ways we examine publics, the texts they circulate, and the channels of textual circulation they employ. Graffiti writing challenges boundaries; indeed, its rhetorical efficacy is tied up in its ability to appear where it should not. In this way, this dissertation mimics this rhetorical expansiveness, with graffiti writing popping up in unexpected and, perhaps, inhospitable places.

Feminist Rhetorical Practices

Author: Jacqueline Jones Royster
Publisher: SIU Press
ISBN: 0809330709
Format: PDF, ePub
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From two leading scholars in the field comes this landmark assessment of the shifting terrain of feminist rhetorical practices in recent decades. Jacqueline Jones Royster and Gesa E. Kirsch contend the field of rhetorical studies is being transformed through the work of feminist rhetoricians who have brought about notable changes in who the subjects of rhetorical study can be, how their practices can be critiqued, and how the effectiveness and value of the inquiry frameworks can be articulated. To contextualize a new and changed landscape for narratives in the history of rhetoric, Royster and Kirsch present four critical terms of engagement—critical imagination, strategic contemplation, social circulation, and globalization—as the foundation for a new analytical model for understanding, interpreting, and evaluating feminist rhetorical inquiry and the study and teaching of rhetoric in general. This model draws directly on the wealth of knowledge and understanding gained from feminist rhetorical practices, especially sensitivity toward meaningfully and respectfully rendering the work, lives, cultures, and traditions of historical and contemporary women in rhetorical scholarship. Proposing ambitious new standards for viewing and valuing excellence in feminist rhetorical practice, Royster and Kirsch advocate an ethos of respect and humility in the analysis of communities and specific rhetorical performances neglected in rhetorical history, recasting rhetorical studies as a global phenomenon rather than a western one. They also reflect on their own personal and professional development as researchers as they highlight innovative feminist research over the past thirty years to articulate how feminist work is changing the field and pointing to the active participation of women in various discourse arenas and to the practices and genres they use. Valuable to new and established scholars of rhetoric, Feminist Rhetorical Practice: New Horizons for Rhetoric, Composition, and Literacy Studies is essential for understanding the theoretical, methodological, and ethical impacts of feminist rhetorical studies on the wider field. Winner, 2014 Winifred Bryan Horner Outstanding Book Award

Networking Arguments

Author: Rebecca Dingo
Publisher: University of Pittsburgh Preaa
ISBN: 0822977885
Format: PDF
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Networking Arguments presents an original study on the use and misuse of global institutional rhetoric and the effects of these practices on women, particularly in developing countries. Using a feminist lens, Rebecca Dingo views the complex networks that rhetoric flows through, globally and nationally, and how it’s often reconfigured to work both for and against women and to maintain existing power structures. To see how rhetorics travel, Dingo deconstructs the central terminology employed by global institutions—mainstreaming, fitness, and empowerment—and shows how their meanings shift depending on the contexts in which they’re used. She studies programs by the World Bank, the United Nations, and the United States, among others, to view the original policies, then follows the trail of their diffusion and manipulation and the ultimate consequences for individuals. To analyze transnational rhetorical processes, Dingo builds a theoretical framework by employing concepts of transcoding, ideological traffic, and interarticulation to uncover the intricacies of power relationships at work within networks. She also views transnational capitalism, neoliberal economics, and neocolonial ideologies as primary determinants of policy and arguments over women’s roles in the global economy. Networking Arguments offers a new method of feminist rhetorical analysis that allows for an increased understanding of global gender policies and encourages strategies to counteract the negative effects they can create.