Cities in the Wilderness The First Century of Urban Life in America 1625 1742

Author: Carl Bridenbaugh
Publisher: Read Books Ltd
ISBN: 1447485874
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Today more than half of all Americans make their homes in cities, and the ease of modern transportation causes the lives of many more to be affected by town conditions. Our national history has been that of transition from a predominantly rural and agricultural way of living to one in which the city plays a major role. Both materially and psychologically urban factors govern much of American life. Their origins are therefore of more than passing interest Many of the earliest books, particularly those dating back to the 1900s and before, are now extremely scarce and increasingly expensive. We are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions, using the original text and artwork.

The Colonial Spanish American City

Author: Jay Kinsbruner
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 9780292779860
Format: PDF, Mobi
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The colonial Spanish-American city, like its counterpart across the Atlantic, was an outgrowth of commercial enterprise. A center of entrepreneurial activity and wealth, it drew people seeking a better life, with more educational, occupational, commercial, bureaucratic, and marital possibilities than were available in the rural regions of the Spanish colonies. Indeed, the Spanish-American city represented hope and opportunity, although not for everyone. In this authoritative work, Jay Kinsbruner draws on many sources to offer the first history and interpretation in English of the colonial Spanish-American city. After an overview of pre-Columbian cities, he devotes chapters to many important aspects of the colonial city, including its governance and administrative structure, physical form, economy, and social and family life. Kinsbruner's overarching thesis is that the Spanish-American city evolved as a circumstance of trans-Atlantic capitalism. Underpinning this thesis is his view that there were no plebeians in the colonial city. He calls for a class interpretation, with an emphasis on the lower-middle class. His study also explores the active roles of women, many of them heads of households, in the colonial Spanish-American city.

Colonial Life

Author: Rebecca Stefoff
Publisher: Marshall Cavendish
ISBN: 9780761412052
Format: PDF
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Presents the history of the British colonies in North America, beginning with the Jamestown settlement, through excerpts from letters, pamphlets, journal entries, and other documents of the time.

Colonial Towns

Author: Verna Fisher
Publisher: Nomad Press
ISBN: 1619303965
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Taking young readers on a journey back in time, this dynamic series showcases various aspects of colonial life. Each book contains creative illustrations, interesting facts, highlighted vocabulary words, end-of-book challenges, and sidebars that help children understand the differences between modern and colonial life and inspire them to imagine what it would have been like to grow up in colonial America. The volumes in this series focus on the colonists but also include relevant information about Native Americans, offering a variety of perspectives on life in the colonies. Entertainment, transportation, and issues of urban living are all discussed in this book about living in a town during colonial times. Explaining how life in town varied from one area of the country to another, this book also compares colonial towns with villages of the Native Americans.

Focus on U S History

Author: Kathy Sammis
Publisher: Walch Publishing
ISBN: 9780825133350
Format: PDF
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Early colonists -- Colonial conflicts and Native Americans -- Rise of individualism abd the seeds of democracy -- Religious diversity and freedom -- Social and cultural life -- Colonial economy -- Rise of slavery. :: Reproducible student activities cover colonial experiences, including interaction with Native Americans, family and social life, the beginnings of slavery, and the seeds democracy.

Town House

Author: Bernard L. Herman
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 0807839167
Format: PDF, Docs
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In this abundantly illustrated volume, Bernard Herman provides a history of urban dwellings and the people who built and lived in them in early America. In the eighteenth century, cities were constant objects of idealization, often viewed as the outward manifestations of an organized, civil society. As the physical objects that composed the largest portion of urban settings, town houses contained and signified different aspects of city life, argues Herman. Taking a material culture approach, Herman examines urban domestic buildings from Charleston, South Carolina, to Portsmouth, New Hampshire, as well as those in English cities and towns, to better understand why people built the houses they did and how their homes informed everyday city life. Working with buildings and documentary sources as diverse as court cases and recipes, Herman interprets town houses as lived experience. Chapters consider an array of domestic spaces, including the merchant family's house, the servant's quarter, and the widow's dower. Herman demonstrates that city houses served as sites of power as well as complex and often conflicted artifacts mapping the everyday negotiations of social identity and the display of sociability.

Cities and Towns

Author: Rebecca Stefoff
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317474597
Format: PDF, Docs
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First Published in 2015. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an Informa company.

The Shoemaker

Author: Ann Heinrichs
Publisher: Marshall Cavendish
ISBN: 9780761447986
Format: PDF, ePub
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"Explore the life of a colonial shoemaker and his importance to the community, as well as everyday life, responsibilities, and social practices during that time"--Provided by publisher.

The Death and Life of Great American Cities

Author: Jane Jacobs
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 052543285X
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Thirty years after its publication, The Death and Life of Great American Cities was described by The New York Times as "perhaps the most influential single work in the history of town planning....[It] can also be seen in a much larger context. It is first of all a work of literature; the descriptions of street life as a kind of ballet and the bitingly satiric account of traditional planning theory can still be read for pleasure even by those who long ago absorbed and appropriated the book's arguments." Jane Jacobs, an editor and writer on architecture in New York City in the early sixties, argued that urban diversity and vitality were being destroyed by powerful architects and city planners. Rigorous, sane, and delightfully epigrammatic, Jacobs's small masterpiece is a blueprint for the humanistic management of cities. It is sensible, knowledgeable, readable, indispensable. The author has written a new foreword for this Modern Library edition.