City People

Author: Gunther Barth
Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand
ISBN: 9780195031942
Format: PDF, ePub
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Depicts the development of such aspects of urban culture as apartment buildings, metropolitan newspapers, department stores, baseball parks, and vaudeville

The American Past A Survey of American History Volume II Since 1865

Author: Joseph Conlin
Publisher: Cengage Learning
ISBN: 0495572896
Format: PDF, ePub
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Author Joseph R. Conlin’s award-winning teaching and writing styles are reflected in this colorful and engaging look at the individuals, events, and ideas that have shaped our nation’s past. Organized into short chapters and updated with new insights into recently published research, this text sets the story in a political context, weaving in social, cultural, economic, intellectual, constitutional, diplomatic, and military events along the way. Conlin’s popular sidebars and How They Lived vignettes-many of which are new in this edition-bring historical stories to life and emphasize the human and social dimensions of history. With its literary prose style and its unifying voice, THE AMERICAN PAST, Ninth Edition will capture and hold your students’ interest as it guides them on a fascinating, eye-opening walk through the years gone by. Conlin’s text is available in the following volume options: THE AMERICAN PAST: A SURVEY OF AMERICAN HISTORY, Comprehensive, (Chapters 1-52), ISBN: 049557287X; VOLUME I: TO 1877, (Chapters 1-24), ISBN: 0495572888; VOLUME II: SINCE 1865, (Chapters 24-52), ISBN: 0495572896. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

The Making of Urban America

Author: Raymond A. Mohl
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 9780842026390
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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The process by which a group of small colonial settlements in an untamed wilderness grew into a highly industrialized and urbanized nation is one of the central and most important themes of American history. The updated Making of Urban America provides a superb collection of essays for students and teachers on the many facets of urban development through history. This detailed and well-researched study traces urban development from the preindustrial city to the twentieth-century city. With emphasis on the social, economic, political, commercial, and cultural aspects of urban history, these essays illustrate the growth and change that brought about modern-day urban life. In his extensive historiographical analysis of urban America, Professor Raymond Mohl introduces the reader to current literature and perspectives on urban history. Dynamic topics such as technology, immigration and ethnicity, suburbanization, sunbelt cities, urban political history, and planning and housing are examined. The Making of Urban America is the only reader available covering all of U.S. urban history and includes the most recent interpretive scholarship on the subject.

City of the Century

Author: Donald L. Miller
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 0684831384
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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A chronicle of the coming of the Industrial Age to one American city traces the explosive entrepreneurial, technological, and artistic growth that converted Chicago from a trading post to a modern industrial metropolis by the 1890s

Fleeting Moments

Author: Gunther Barth
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780195362671
Format: PDF, Kindle
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The tension between nature and culture, which accompanies the rise of any large society, has become a subject of great concern in our time. In this compelling study, Gunther Barth, acclaimed author of City People: The Rise of Modern City Culture in Nineteenth-Century America, identifies fleeting moments of concord between nature and culture in the course of American history. During the search for the Wilderness Passage, the progress of the Lewis and Clark expedition, and the building of park cemeteries and big city parks, Americans realized that nature was not merely a force to be reckoned with, not merely a resource to be exploited, but also an integral component of their lives. Through the engineering of nature and culture in the urban environment, the energetic attempts to conserve large-scale nature in the United States emerged as an offspring of the big city. Heightening our understanding of the historical complexity of the relationship between nature and culture, and suggesting that harmony between the two is a mark of civilization, this original study will be an invaluable guide to anyone concerned with the quality of life in America, past and future.

Urban Appetites

Author: Cindy R. Lobel
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022612889X
Format: PDF, ePub
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Glossy magazines write about them, celebrities give their names to them, and you’d better believe there’s an app (or ten) committed to finding you the right one. They are New York City restaurants and food shops. And their journey to international notoriety is a captivating one. The now-booming food capital was once a small seaport city, home to a mere six municipal food markets that were stocked by farmers, fishermen, and hunters who lived in the area. By 1890, however, the city’s population had grown to more than one million, and residents could dine in thousands of restaurants with a greater abundance and variety of options than any other place in the United States. Historians, sociologists, and foodies alike will devour the story of the origins of New York City’s food industry in Urban Appetites. Cindy R. Lobel focuses on the rise of New York as both a metropolis and a food capital, opening a new window onto the intersection of the cultural, social, political, and economic transformations of the nineteenth century. She offers wonderfully detailed accounts of public markets and private food shops; basement restaurants and immigrant diners serving favorites from the old country; cake and coffee shops; and high-end, French-inspired eating houses made for being seen in society as much as for dining. But as the food and the population became increasingly cosmopolitan, corruption, contamination, and undeniably inequitable conditions escalated. Urban Appetites serves up a complete picture of the evolution of the city, its politics, and its foodways.

The Spectator and the City in Nineteenth Century American Literature

Author: Dana Brand
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521362078
Format: PDF, Kindle
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In this publication, Brand traces the origin of the flaneur, a detached, casual, and powerful urban spectator, who regards the metropolis as an entertaining spectacle and text, of seventeenth-century English literature. He then discusses the development of the English language tradition of the flaneur in its social, cultural, and philosophical contexts. Taking the encounter with the spectator and city life as an important point of contact with modernity, Brand offers his own readings of three of the most important American writers of the nineteenth century, Poe, Hawthorne, and Whitman, and the way in which, at various points in their work, each author represents a spectator who looks at a city crowd and responds to it as an entertaining spectacle, tracing the similarities and the differences that distinguish each author in his common search for literary forms adequate to the rush of city life.

The Routledge Research Companion to Law and Humanities in Nineteenth Century America

Author: Nan Goodman
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 1317042972
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Nineteenth-century America witnessed some of the most important and fruitful areas of intersection between the law and humanities, as people began to realize that the law, formerly confined to courts and lawyers, might also find expression in a variety of ostensibly non-legal areas such as painting, poetry, fiction, and sculpture. Bringing together leading researchers from law schools and humanities departments, this Companion touches on regulatory, statutory, and common law in nineteenth-century America and encompasses judges, lawyers, legislators, litigants, and the institutions they inhabited (courts, firms, prisons). It will serve as a reference for specific information on a variety of law- and humanities-related topics as well as a guide to understanding how the two disciplines developed in tandem in the long nineteenth century.

The Horse in the City

Author: Clay McShane
Publisher: JHU Press
ISBN: 9780801886003
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Clay McShane and Joel A. Tarr reveal the critical role that the horse played in the growing nineteenth-century metropolis. They explore how the horses were housed and fed, and how equine workers bred, trained, marketed, and employed their four-legged assets.