Columbia University and Morningside Heights

Author: Michael V. Susi
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 9780738549767
Format: PDF
Download Now
Outgrowing its remarkably shortlived location in midtown Manhattan, Columbia College moved uptown in the mid1890s, not only transforming itself into an urban university under university president Seth Low, but also creating an urban campus guided by Charles McKim, William Rutherford Mead, and Stanford White's master plan. The university became a major constituent of what would be described as New York's Acropolis on Morningside Heights. It was preceded in this endeavor by the Cathedral Church of St. John the Divine and St. Luke's Hospital, and it was soon joined by Barnard College, Teachers College, and Union Theological Seminary, among others. The arrival of the Interborough Rapid Transit Subway in 1904 spurred residential and retail development.

A Storm Foretold

Author: Christiane Collins
Publisher: eBook Bakery
ISBN: 9781938517488
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download Now
A Storm Foretold: Columbia University and Morningside Heights, 1968 offers an eyewitness account of the famous confrontation between Columbia and its surrounding community, one of the pivotal civil rights battles that characterized the sixties. Focused from the point of view of urban planning, author and urban historian Christiane Crasemann Collins provides firsthand insight into a preeminent institution's racially motivated tactics. With extensive research, architectural maps, and photos of the protests, A Storm Foretold shows how the university pursued the goal of creating an exclusive white acropolis on the Hudson, justified as a "need for expansion." Beginning with a plan to acquire properties on Morningside Heights, and then to empty them of "undesirable" tenants, a planned cordon sanitaire was intended to blockade the campus against the presumed alien territory of the surrounding neighborhoods, including areas in West Harlem and Morningside Park. In 1968, ignoring growing community opposition, Columbia began construction of a gymnasium next to an athletic field the university had shared with the community since the 1950s at the southern end of the scenic park. Collins' story might be titled, "Morningside Park: A Civil Rights Battle Ground" as grassroots opposition by the multi-racial community grew vigorous. Long angered by an intentionally decimating housing policy, and using "Gym Crow" as the symbol of Columbia's racist policy, community residents, students, and African-American organizations united to call for an end to the gymnasium's "invasion" of public open space. A Storm Foretold brings alive the institutional insensitivity and arrogance that ignited the civil rights movement in Morningside Heights, and the issues Collins presents are as relevant today as they were in the sixties.

Harlem vs Columbia University

Author: Stefan M. Bradley
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 0252090586
Format: PDF, Mobi
Download Now
In 1968-69, Columbia University became the site for a collision of American social movements. Black Power, student power, antiwar, New Left, and Civil Rights movements all clashed with local and state politics when an alliance of black students and residents of Harlem and Morningside Heights openly protested the school's ill-conceived plan to build a large, private gymnasium in the small green park that separates the elite university from Harlem. Railing against the university's expansion policy, protesters occupied administration buildings and met violent opposition from both fellow students and the police. In this dynamic book, Stefan M. Bradley describes the impact of Black Power ideology on the Students' Afro-American Society (SAS) at Columbia. While white students--led by Mark Rudd and Students for a Democratic Society (SDS)--sought to radicalize the student body and restructure the university, black students focused on stopping the construction of the gym in Morningside Park. Through separate, militant action, black students and the black community stood up to the power of an Ivy League institution and stopped it from trampling over its relatively poor and powerless neighbors. Bradley also compares the events at Columbia with similar events at Harvard, Cornell, Yale, and the University of Pennsylvania.

Morningside Heights

Author: Andrew S. Dolkart
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 9780231078511
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Download Now
Evelyn Blackwood and Saskia Wieringa have compiled thirteen essays from a group of historians, sociologists, and anthropologists who discuss same-sex desire among women outside the West, exploring female eroticism in such societies and cultures as India, Polynesia, Latin America, Native North America, and southern Africa.Female Desires offers compelling evidence against the commonly accepted notion that non-Western women are generally passive victims of male domination and compulsory heterosexuality. It also dispells the idea that same-sex female desire is rooted in Western neo-imperialist culture: contributors show non-Western women to be active agents of their own sexual identities. Essays include Giti Thadani on lesbian desire in ancient and modern India, Saskia Wieringa on butch-femme social types in Indonesia and Peru, and Norma Mogrovejo on the lesbian movement in Mexico.In a larger sense, the essays attempt to look past the ethnocentric categories in which sexuality, identity, and culture are often considered.

Morningside Heights

Author: Cheryl Mendelson
Publisher: Random House Trade Paperbacks
ISBN: 0375760687
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Download Now
Long-time residents of Morningside Heights, a once marginal neighborhood attracting the attention of Wall Street types in search of a good investment and more space, are faced with dramatic changes to their community as increasing prices and a rising cost of living begin to force this group of artists, musicians, and intellectuals out of the area. A first novel. Reader's Guide included. Reprint. 15,000 first printing.

Stand Columbia

Author: Robert McCaughey
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231503555
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download Now
-- Merri Rosenberg, Education Update

My Columbia

Author: Ashbel Green
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 9780231134866
Format: PDF, ePub
Download Now
From where--and what--does water come? How did it become the key to life in the universe? Water from Heaven presents a state-of-the-art portrait of the science of water, recounting how the oxygen needed to form H2O originated in the nuclear reactions in the interiors of stars, asking whether microcomets may be replenishing our world's oceans, and explaining how the Moon and planets set ice-age rhythms by way of slight variations in Earth's orbit and rotation. The book then takes the measure of water today in all its states, solid and gaseous as well as liquid. How do the famous El Niño and La Niña events in the Pacific affect our weather? What clues can water provide scientists in search of evidence of climate changes of the past, and how does it complicate their predictions of future global warming? Finally, Water from Heaven deals with the role of water in the rise and fall of civilizations. As nations grapple over watershed rights and pollution controls, water is poised to supplant oil as the most contested natural resource of the new century. The vast majority of water "used" today is devoted to large-scale agriculture and though water is a renewable resource, it is not an infinite one. Already many parts of the world are running up against the limits of what is readily available. Water from Heaven is, in short, the full story of water and all its remarkable properties. It spans from water's beginnings during the formation of stars, all the way through the origin of the solar system, the evolution of life on Earth, the rise of civilization, and what will happen in the future. Dealing with the physical, chemical, biological, and political importance of water, this book transforms our understanding of our most precious, and abused, resource. Robert Kandel shows that water presents us with a series of crucial questions and pivotal choices that will change the way you look at your next glass of water.

A Time to Stir

Author: Paul Cronin
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231544332
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download Now
For seven days in April 1968, students occupied five buildings on the campus of Columbia University to protest a planned gymnasium in a nearby Harlem park, links between the university and the Vietnam War, and what they saw as the university’s unresponsive attitude toward students and faculty. Exhilarating to some and troubling to others, the student protests paralyzed the university, grabbed the world’s attention, and inspired other uprisings. Fifty years after the events, A Time to Stir captures the reflections of those who participated in and witnessed the Columbia rebellion. With more than sixty essays from members of the Columbia chapter of Students for a Democratic Society, the Students’ Afro-American Society, faculty, undergraduates who opposed the protests, “outside agitators,” and members of the New York Police Department, A Time to Stir sheds light on the politics, passions, and ideals of the 1960s. Moving beyond accounts from the student movement’s white leadership, this book presents the perspectives of black students, who were dealing with their uneasy integration into a supposedly liberal campus, as well as the views of women, who increasingly questioned their second-class status within the protest movement and society at large. A Time to Stir also speaks to the complicated legacy of the uprising. For many, the events at Columbia inspired a lifelong dedication to social causes while for others they signaled the beginning of the chaos that would soon engulf Students for a Democratic Society. Taken together, these reflections present a nuanced and moving portrait that reflects the sense of possibility and excess that characterized the 1960s.