Coming to Terms with the Nation

Author: Thomas Mullaney
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520262786
Format: PDF, Docs
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Studies China's "Ethnic classification project" (minzu shibie) of 1954, conducted in Yunnan province.

Imagined Civilizations

Author: Roger Hart
Publisher: JHU Press
ISBN: 1421406063
Format: PDF, Mobi
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While the Jesuits claimed Xu as a convert, he presented the Jesuits as men from afar who had traveled from the West to China to serve the emperor.

World Heritage Sites and Indigenous Peoples Rights

Author: Stefan Disko
Publisher: International Work Group for Indegenous Aff
ISBN:
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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This book includes twenty case studies of World Heritage sites from around the world that explore, from a human rights perspective, indigenous peoples' experiences with World Heritage sites and with the processes of the World Heritage Convention. The book will serve as a resource for indigenous peoples, World Heritage site managers, and UNESCO, as well as academics, and it will contribute to discussions about what changes or actions are needed to ensure that World Heritage sites can play a consistently positive role for indigenous peoples, in line with the spirit of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

Sinophone Studies

Author: Shu-mei Shih
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231527101
Format: PDF, ePub
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This definitive anthology casts Sinophone studies as the study of Sinitic-language cultures born of colonial and postcolonial influences. Essays by such authors as Rey Chow, Ha Jin, Leo Ou-fan Lee, Ien Ang, Wei-ming Tu, and David Wang address debates concerning the nature of Chineseness while introducing readers to essential readings in Tibetan, Malaysian, Taiwanese, French, Caribbean, and American Sinophone literatures. By placing Sinophone cultures at the crossroads of multiple empires, this anthology richly demonstrates the transformative power of multiculturalism and multilingualism, and by examining the place-based cultural and social practices of Sinitic-language communities in their historical contexts beyond "China proper," it effectively refutes the diasporic framework. It is an invaluable companion for courses in Asian, postcolonial, empire, and ethnic studies, as well as world and comparative literature.