Coming to Terms with the Nation

Author: Thomas Mullaney
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520262786
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Studies China's "Ethnic classification project" (minzu shibie) of 1954, conducted in Yunnan province.

Imagined Civilizations

Author: Roger Hart
Publisher: JHU Press
ISBN: 1421406063
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While the Jesuits claimed Xu as a convert, he presented the Jesuits as men from afar who had traveled from the West to China to serve the emperor.

Luxury and Rubble

Author: Erik Harms
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520292510
Format: PDF, Docs
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"Luxury and Rubble is the tale of two cities within a city. It is the story of two master-planned, mixed-use residential and commercial developments that are changing the face of Ho Chi Minh City. The two developments that Erik Harms examines are examples of urban development projects known in Vietnam as 'New Urban Zones.' These programs, which were born in the early 1990s, are steadily reorganizing the urban landscape in cities across the country. For many Vietnamese, they are a symbol of the country's emergence into global modernity and post-socialist economic reforms. However, they are also sites of great contestation, sparking land disputes and controversies over how to compensate evicted residents. This is a vivid portrayal of urban reorganization along deeply human terms, which delves into the complex and sometimes contradictory experiences of individuals grappling with the forces of privatization in a socialist country"--Provided by publisher.

Mabiki

Author: Fabian Drixler
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520953614
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This book tells the story of a society reversing deeply held worldviews and revolutionizing its demography. In parts of eighteenth-century Japan, couples raised only two or three children. As villages shrank and domain headcounts dwindled, posters of child-murdering she-devils began to appear, and governments offered to pay their subjects to have more children. In these pages, the long conflict over the meaning of infanticide comes to life once again. Those who killed babies saw themselves as responsible parents to their chosen children. Those who opposed infanticide redrew the boundaries of humanity so as to encompass newborn infants and exclude those who would not raise them. In Eastern Japan, the focus of this book, population growth resumed in the nineteenth century. According to its village registers, more and more parents reared all their children. Others persisted in the old ways, leaving traces of hundreds of thousands of infanticides in the statistics of the modern Japanese state. Nonetheless, by 1925, total fertility rates approached six children per women in the very lands where raising four had once been considered profligate. This reverse fertility transition suggests that the demographic history of the world is more interesting than paradigms of unidirectional change would have us believe, and that the future of fertility and population growth may yet hold many surprises.

Affirmative Action in China and the U S

Author: M. Zhou
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 0230100929
Format: PDF
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This volume is the first to comprehensively examine Chinese's affirmative action policies in the critical area of minority education, the most important conduit to employment and economic success in the PRC after the economic reforms begun in the late 1970s.

Republican Lens

Author: Joan Judge
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520284364
Format: PDF, Mobi
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"The early Republican (1911-1921) Chinese public looked, read, and interacted in profoundly different ways from its late imperial predecessor. While current scholarly has labeled the 1911 Revolution a virtual 'non-event' and the early Republic a political failure, the micro-historical view offered by the Chinese periodical press presents a much different perspective. Reversing orthodox academic practice, this book considers the realm of high politics as ephemeral and the institutions, associations, and practices of the reading and viewing public as the site of enduring and historical significance. The book centers on a selection of extraordinary photographic portraits taken from the periodical Funü shibao, one of the few journals to straddle the 1911 divide and remain in print through the early Republican period"--Provided by publisher.

The Nature of the Beasts

Author: Ian Jared Miller
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520952103
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It is widely known that such Western institutions as the museum, the university, and the penitentiary shaped Japan’s emergence as a modern nation-state. Less commonly recognized is the role played by the distinctly hybrid institution—at once museum, laboratory, and prison—of the zoological garden. In this eye-opening study of Japan’s first modern zoo, Tokyo’s Ueno Imperial Zoological Gardens, opened in 1882, Ian Jared Miller offers a refreshingly unconventional narrative of Japan’s rapid modernization and changing relationship with the natural world. As the first zoological garden in the world not built under the sway of a Western imperial regime, the Ueno Zoo served not only as a staple attraction in the nation’s capital—an institutional marker of national accomplishment—but also as a site for the propagation of a new "natural" order that was scientifically verifiable and evolutionarily foreordained. As the Japanese empire grew, Ueno became one of the primary sites of imperialist spectacle, a microcosm of the empire that could be traveled in the course of a single day. The meaning of the zoo would change over the course of Imperial Japan’s unraveling and subsequent Allied occupation. Today it remains one of Japan’s most frequently visited places. But instead of empire in its classic political sense, it now bespeaks the ambivalent dominion of the human species over the natural environment, harkening back to its imperial roots even as it asks us to question our exploitation of the planet’s resources.

Ethnicity in China A Critical Introduction

Author: Xiaowei Zang
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 0745690459
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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On the global stage, China is often seen to be a homogenous nation when, in fact, it is a diverse multi-ethnic society, with 55 minority nationality groups recognized by the government. Scattered across the vast landmass, ethnic minorities in China occupy a precarious place in the state, where the Confucian concept of cultural community plays down ethnicity and encourages integration of minority nationalities into the majority Han-Chinese society. This insightful book reveals the ethnic diversity underlying the People’s Republic of China and examines how ethnicity intersects with social and political issues through key themes such as ethnic inequality, the preservation and contribution of the rich traditions and customs of minority cultures, and the autonomy of regions such as Tibet and Xinjiang. The author investigates the important role of the state and Beijing’s assimilation stance to show how its nationality policy, driven by Confucian assimilation ideology, has dictated China’s own minority rights regime and influenced its foreign policy towards international minority rights. This book by a distinguished scholar of ethnicity in China will be essential reading for students and scholars of race and ethnic relations, nationalism and Chinese culture and society.

Hygienic Modernity

Author: Ruth Rogaski
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520283821
Format: PDF, Docs
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Placing meanings of health and disease at the center of modern Chinese consciousness, Ruth Rogaski reveals how hygiene became a crucial element in the formulation of Chinese modernity in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Rogaski focuses on multiple manifestations across time of a single Chinese concept, weisheng—which has been rendered into English as "hygiene," "sanitary," "health," or "public health"—as it emerged in the complex treaty-port environment of Tianjin. Before the late nineteenth century, weisheng was associated with diverse regimens of diet, meditation, and self-medication. Hygienic Modernity reveals how meanings of weisheng, with the arrival of violent imperialism, shifted from Chinese cosmology to encompass such ideas as national sovereignty, laboratory knowledge, the cleanliness of bodies, and the fitness of races: categories in which the Chinese were often deemed lacking by foreign observers and Chinese elites alike.

Cultural Encounters on Chinas Ethnic Frontiers

Author: Stevan Harrell
Publisher: University of Washington Press
ISBN: 0295804084
Format: PDF, Kindle
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China's exploitation by Western imperialism is well known, but the imperialist treatment within China of ethnic minorities has been little explored. Around the geographic periphery of China, as well as some of the less accessible parts of the interior, and even in its cities, live a variety of peoples of different origins, languages, ecological adaptations, and cultures. These people have interacted for centuries with the Han Chinese majority, with other minority ethnic groups (minzu), and with non-Chinese, but identification of distinct groups and analysis of their history and relationship to others still are problematic. Cultural Encounters on China's Ethnic Frontiers provides rich material for the comparative study of colonialism and imperialism and for the study of Chinese nation-building. It represents some of the first scholarship on ethnic minorities in China based on direct research since before World War II. This, combined with increasing awareness in the West of the importance of ethnic relations, makes it an especially timely book. It will be of interest to anthopologists, historians, and political scientists, as well as to sinologists.