Confession of Faith in a Mennonite Perspective

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Publisher: Herald Press (VA)
ISBN: 9780836190434
Format: PDF, ePub
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Adopted by the General Conference Mennonite Church and the Mennonite Church at Wichita, Kansas, July 1995. The 24 articles and summary statement were accepted by both groups as their statement of faith for teaching and nurture in the life of the church.

Mennonite Confession of Faith

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Publisher: Herald Press (VA)
ISBN: 9780836113143
Format: PDF, Kindle
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In 1921 Mennonite General Conference adopted a statement on the Fundamentals of the Christian Faith consisting of eighteen articles. But in recent years there has been some conviction that is is imperative to draw up a new confession of faith, not to repudiate any earlier confession, but to restate the doctrinal position of the church in terms relevant to today's issues, and especially to incorporate the insights of the various doctrinal pronouncements of Mennonite General Conference.

What Mennonites Believe

Author: John Christian Wenger
Publisher: Herald Press (VA)
ISBN: 9780836118339
Format: PDF
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Mennonites are and what they stand for. He goes on to explore beliefs held in common by Christians of all denominations and highlights those stressed by Mennonites. Included is an explanation of how the 16th-century Radical Reformation group, the Anabaptists, are the spiritual ancestors of Mennonites and how what the Anabaptists taught and the persecution they experienced affects Mennonite beliefs today. Recommended for Mennonites as a helpful aid to explaining their beliefs and for those curious about the beliefs and lifestyle of simplicity, biblical pacifism, strong sense of community, and service orientation of Mennonites.

The Bloody Theater Or Martyrs Mirror

Author: Thieleman J. van Braght
Publisher: Herald Press (VA)
ISBN: 9780836192308
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Thieleman J. van Braght's record of Christian faith and endurance from the first century to the Anabaptist persecutions in the 16th by a Dutch Mennonite to strengthen the faith of his fellow believers and translated into German in 1748 at the time of the French and Indian War for the same reason. Translated into English in 1886.

Chosen Nation

Author: Benjamin W. Goossen
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400885191
Format: PDF, Kindle
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During the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, the global Mennonite church developed an uneasy relationship with Germany. Despite the religion's origins in the Swiss and Dutch Reformation, as well as its longstanding pacifism, tens of thousands of members embraced militarist German nationalism. Chosen Nation is a sweeping history of this encounter and the debates it sparked among parliaments, dictatorships, and congregations across Eurasia and the Americas. Offering a multifaceted perspective on nationalism's emergence in Europe and around the world, Benjamin Goossen demonstrates how Mennonites' nationalization reflected and reshaped their faith convictions. While some church leaders modified German identity along Mennonite lines, others appropriated nationalism wholesale, advocating a specifically Mennonite version of nationhood. Examining sources from Poland to Paraguay, Goossen shows how patriotic loyalties rose and fell with religious affiliation. Individuals might claim to be German at one moment but Mennonite the next. Some external parties encouraged separatism, as when the Weimar Republic helped establish an autonomous "Mennonite State" in Latin America. Still others treated Mennonites as quintessentially German; under Hitler's Third Reich, entire colonies benefited from racial warfare and genocide in Nazi-occupied Ukraine. Whether choosing Germany as a national homeland or identifying as a chosen people, called and elected by God, Mennonites committed to collective action in ways that were intricate, fluid, and always surprising. The first book to place Christianity and diaspora at the heart of nationality studies, Chosen Nation illuminates the rising religious nationalism of our own age.

Mennonite Girls Can Cook

Author: Lovella Schellenberg
Publisher: Herald Press (VA)
ISBN: 9780836195538
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Mennonite Girls Can Cook is a blog about recipes, hospitality, relationships, encouragement and helping the hungry-and now it's a book, too! Like the blog, Mennonite Girls Can Cook-the book-is more than just recipes. It is about hospitality, versus entertaining; about blessing, versus impressing. It is about taking God's Bounty, and co-creating the goodness from God's creation into something that can bless family and friends, and help sustain health and energy.

Latino Mennonites

Author: Felipe Hinojosa
Publisher: JHU Press
ISBN: 1421412845
Format: PDF, ePub
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Felipe Hinojosa's parents first encountered Mennonite families as migrant workers in the tomato fields of northwestern Ohio. What started as mutual admiration quickly evolved into a relationship that strengthened over the years and eventually led to his parents founding a Mennonite Church in South Texas. Throughout his upbringing as a Mexican American evangélico, Hinojosa was faced with questions not only about his own religion but also about broader issues of Latino evangelicalism, identity, and civil rights politics. Latino Mennonites offers the first historical analysis of the changing relationship between religion and ethnicity among Latino Mennonites. Drawing heavily on primary sources in Spanish, such as newspapers and oral history interviews, Hinojosa traces the rise of the Latino presence within the Mennonite Church from the origins of Mennonite missions in Latino communities in Chicago, South Texas, Puerto Rico, and New York City, to the conflicted relationship between the Mennonite Church and the California farmworker movements, and finally to the rise of Latino evangelical politics. He also analyzes how the politics of the Chicano, Puerto Rican, and black freedom struggles of the 1960s and 1970s civil rights movements captured the imagination of Mennonite leaders who belonged to a church known more for rural and peaceful agrarian life than for social protest. Whether in terms of religious faith and identity, race, immigrant rights, or sexuality, the politics of belonging has historically presented both challenges and possibilities for Latino evangelicals in the religious landscapes of twentieth-century America. In Latino Mennonites, Hinojosa has interwoven church history with social history to explore dimensions of identity in Latino Mennonite communities and to create a new way of thinking about the history of American evangelicalism. -- Timothy Matovina, University of Notre Dame

The Schleitheim Confession

Author: John Howard Yoder
Publisher: Herald Press (VA)
ISBN:
Format: PDF, Docs
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John H. Yoder, editor and translator. In the historic meeting held in 1527 at Schleitheim, Switzerland, an ad hoc group of Anabaptists worked through fundamental disagreements and emerged with a consensus on seven points of faith which became known as the Schleitheim Confession. One chapter from The Legacy of Michael Sattler.