Amulets Effigies Fetishes and Charms

Author: Edward J. Lenik
Publisher: University of Alabama Press
ISBN: 0817319239
Format: PDF
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Amulets, Effigies, Fetishes, and Charms rounds out Edward J. Lenik's comprehensive and expert study of the rock art of northeastern Native Americans. This volume provides a basis for interpreting the symbolism of more than eighty portable stone artifacts found in the region.

Native America

Author: Daniel S. Murphree
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 0313381267
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Discusses Native American history through the lens of all fifty U.S. states in which American Indians lived or helped shape, featuring for each state a chronology, historical overview, cultural contributions, and notable Indians.

Our Beloved Kin

Author: Lisa Brooks
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300196733
Format: PDF, ePub
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A compelling and original recovery of Native American resistance and adaptation to colonial America With rigorous original scholarship and creative narration, Lisa Brooks recovers a complex picture of war, captivity, and Native resistance during the "First Indian War" (later named King Philip's War) by relaying the stories of Weetamoo, a female Wampanoag leader, and James Printer, a Nipmuc scholar, whose stories converge in the captivity of Mary Rowlandson. Through both a narrow focus on Weetamoo, Printer, and their network of relations, and a far broader scope that includes vast Indigenous geographies, Brooks leads us to a new understanding of the history of colonial New England and of American origins. Brooks's pathbreaking scholarship is grounded not just in extensive archival research but also in the land and communities of Native New England, reading the actions of actors during the seventeenth century alongside an analysis of the landscape and interpretations informed by tribal history.

House of Lost Worlds

Author: Richard Conniff
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300211635
Format: PDF, ePub
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A gripping tale of 150 years of scientific adventure, research, and discovery at the Yale Peabody Museum

Memory Lands

Author: Christine M. DeLucia
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300231121
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Noted historian Christine DeLucia offers a major reconsideration of the violent seventeenth-century conflict in northeastern America known as King Philip’s War, providing an alternative to Pilgrim-centric narratives that have conventionally dominated the histories of colonial New England. DeLucia grounds her study of one of the most devastating conflicts between Native Americans and European settlers in early America in five specific places that were directly affected by the crisis, spanning the Northeast as well as the Atlantic world. She examines the war’s effects on the everyday lives and collective mentalities of the region’s diverse Native and Euro-American communities over the course of several centuries, focusing on persistent struggles over land and water, sovereignty, resistance, cultural memory, and intercultural interactions. An enlightening work that draws from oral traditions, archival traces, material and visual culture, archaeology, literature, and environmental studies, this study reassesses the nature and enduring legacies of a watershed historical event.

Native Modernism

Author: George Morrison
Publisher: University of Washington Press
ISBN:
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Native Modernism: The Art of George Morrison and Allan Houser showcases magnificent paintings, drawings, and sculptures by two highly acclaimed artists. In this groundbreaking, beautifully illustrated book, distinguished Native American writers and scholars add a rich new dimension to previously published accounts of Native American art with a fascinating exploration of Morrison's and Houser's work in the context of contemporary art, Native American art history, and cultural identity. George Morrison (Grand Portage Band of Chippewa, 1919–2000) and Allan Houser (Warm Springs Chiricahua Apache, 1914–1994) shattered expectations for Native art, and paved the way for successive generations to experiment with a wide array of styles and techniques. Born in a small Chippewa community in Minnesota, Morrison traveled and studied in New York City and Europe during an extraordinarily creative period in twentieth-century art. He emerged triumphantly as both a major American artist and an Indian artist. Often described as an abstract expressionist, Morrison developed, in such celebrated series as his Horizon paintings, a non-figurative visual language. Sculptor and painter Allan Houser also forged a unique path that redefined the way art by Native Americans is viewed and understood. The work of this prominent twentieth-century artist has appeared in important exhibitions in the Americas, Europe, and Asia, and his monumental bronze Offering of the Sacred Pipe, installed at the U.S. Mission to the United Nations, has become a worldwide symbol of peace.