Cosmology in Antiquity

Author: Rosemary Wright
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134524188
Format: PDF, Mobi
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The popularity of Stephen Hawking's work has put cosmology back in the public eye. The question of how the universe began, and why it hangs together, still puzzles scientists. Their puzzlement began two and a half thousand years ago when Greek philosophers first 'looked up at the sky and formed a theory of everything.' Though their solutions are little credited today, the questions remain fresh. The early Greek thinkers struggled to come to terms with and explain the totality of their surroundings; to identitify an original substance from which the universe was compounded; and to reconcile the presence of balance and proportion with the apparent disorder of the universe. Rosemary Wright examines the cosmological theories of the `natural philosophers' from Thales, Anaximander and Anaximenes to Plato, the Stoics and the NeoPlatonists. The importance of Babylonian and Egyptian forerunners is emphasised. Cosmology in Antiquity is a comprehensive introduction to the cosmological thought of antiquity, the first such survey since Neugebauer's work of 1962.

Phenomenology Ontopoiesis Retrieving Geo cosmic Horizons of Antiquity

Author: Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9789400716919
Format: PDF, Docs
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The controversy of flux and stasis as the groundwork of reality of Greek ancient philosophy reached its crux in the all encompassing doctrine of the logos by Heraclitus of Ephesus. It centers upon human soul in its role with the cosmos. Philosophy of the Occident corroborating Greek insights with the progress of culture in numerous interpretations (Kant, Kierkegaard, Husserl, Merleau-Ponty, Ricoeur...), presented in this collection has neglected the cosmic sphere. While contemporary development of science revealed its grounding principles (papers by Grandpierre, Kule and Trutty-Coohill) the ancient logos fully emerges. Thus, logos hitherto hidden in our commerce with earth is revealed in its intertwinings with the cosmos through the trajectories of the phenomenology/ontopoiesis of life (Tymieniecka). The crucial link between the soul and the cosmos, in a new geo-cosmic horizon, is thus being retrieved.

Science Religion and Mormon Cosmology

Author: Erich Robert Paul
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 9780252018954
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Merrill, who urged a unique vision of reality that shaped a Mormon eschatology. He shows how authorities eventually retreated from the perception of reality as "true" and adopted a scientifically less secure position in order to protect their theology, an eventuality which ultimately resulted in a reactionary response to science within Mormonism.

Science Writing in Greco Roman Antiquity

Author: Liba Taub
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 110813260X
Format: PDF, ePub
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We access Greek and Roman scientific ideas mainly through those texts which happen to survive. By concentrating only on the ideas conveyed, we may limit our understanding of the meaning of those ideas in their historical context. Through considering the diverse ways in which scientific ideas were communicated, in different types of texts, we can uncover otherwise hidden meanings and more fully comprehend the historical contexts in which those ideas were produced and shared, the aims of the authors and the expectations of ancient readers. Liba Taub explores the rich variety of formats used to discuss scientific, mathematical and technical subjects, from c.700 BCE to the sixth century CE. Each chapter concentrates on a particular genre - poetry, letter, encyclopaedia, commentary and biography - offering an introduction to Greek and Roman scientific ideas, while using a selection of ancient writings to focus on the ways in which we encounter them.

Time in Antiquity

Author: Robert Hannah
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 0203392477
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Time in Antiquity explores the different perceptions of time from Classical antiquity, principally through the technology designed to measure, mark or tell time. The material discussed ranges from the sixth century BC in archaic Greece to the 3rd century AD in the Roman Empire, and offers fascinating insights into ordinary people’s perceptions of time and time-keeping instruments. Cosmic time is defined, as expressed through the movements of the sun, moon and stars in themselves or against the backdrop of the natural landscape. Robert Hannah subsequently discusses calendars, artificial schedules designed to mark time through the year, with particular attention being given to an analysis of the Antikythera Mechanism – the most complex, geared, astronomical instrument surviving from antiquity, and the object of exciting recent scientific studies. At the core of the book is an analysis of the development of sundial technology, from elementary human shadow-casting to the well-known spherical, conical and plane sundials of antiquity. The science behind these sundials, as well as other means of measuring time, such as water clocks, is explained in simple and clear terms. The use of the built environment as a means of marking time is also examined through a case study of the Pantheon in Rome. The impact of these various instruments on ordinary human life is highlighted throughout, as are ordinary perceptions of time in everyday life.

Greek Science in Antiquity

Author: Marshall Clagett
Publisher: Courier Corporation
ISBN: 9780486419732
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Lucid coverage of science and early natural philosophy: Greek medicine, biology, mathematics, physics and astronomy; Roman and Latin science in late antiquity and early Middle Ages; Greek science in the age of Justinian; and more. A scholarly, nontechnical study that will appeal to anyone interested in the history of science.

Time and Cosmos in Greco Roman Antiquity

Author: James Evans
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 0691174407
Format: PDF, Docs
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The Greeks and Romans lived according to a distinctively Hellenic conception of time as an aspect of cosmic order and regularity. Appropriating ideas from Egypt and the Near East, the Greeks integrated them into a cosmological framework governed by mathematics and linking the cycles of the heavenly bodies to the human environment. From their cosmology they derived instruments for measuring and tracking the passage of time that were sophisticated embodiments of scientific reasoning and technical craft, meant not solely for the study of specialists and connoisseurs but for the public gaze. Time and Cosmos in Greco-Roman Antiquity, the accompanying catalogue for the exhibition at the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World, New York University, explores through thematic essays and beautiful illustrations the practical as well as the artistic, ideological, and spiritual role of time technology and time imagery in the Mediterranean civilizations. Highlights among the more than one hundred objects from the exhibition include marvelously inventive sundials and portable timekeeping devices, stone and ceramic calendars, zodiac boards for displaying horoscopes, and mosaics, sculptures, and coins that reflect ancient perceptions of the controlling power of time and the heavens. Contributors include James Evans, Dorian Gieseler Greenbaum, Stephan Heilen, Alexander Jones, Daryn Lehoux, Karlheinz Schaldach, John Steele, and Bernhard Weisser. Exhibition Dates: October 19, 2016–April 23, 2017 Cover photograph © Bruce M. White, 201?

Physics Cosmology and Astronomy 1300 1700 Tension and Accommodation

Author: Sabetai Unguru
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9401133425
Format: PDF, ePub
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Habent sua Jata colloquia. The present volume has its ongms in a spring 1984 international workshop held, under the auspices of the Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities, by The Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and Ideas of Tel-Aviv University in cooperation with The Van Leer Jerusalem Foundation. It contains twelve of the twenty papers presented at the workshop by the twenty-six participants. As Proceedings of conferences go, it is a good representative of the genre, sharing in the main characteristics of its ilk. It may even be one of the rare instances of a book of Proceed ings whose descriptive title applies equally well to the workshop's topic and to the interrelations between. the various papers it includes. Tension and Accommodation are the key words. Thus, while John Glucker's paper, 'Images of Plato in Late Antiqu ity,' raises, by means of the Platonic example, the problem of interpreta tion of ancient texts, suggesting the assignment of proper weight to the creator of the tradition and not only to his many later interpreters in assessing the proper relationship between originator and commentators, Abraham Wasserstein's 'Hunches that did not come off: Some Prob lems in Greek Science' illustrates the long-lived Whiggish tradition in the history of science and mathematics. As those familiar with my work will undoubtedly note, Wasserstein's position is far removed from my stance on ancient Greek mathematics.

The Oxford Handbook of Late Antiquity

Author: Scott Fitzgerald Johnson
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199996334
Format: PDF, Docs
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The Oxford Handbook of Late Antiquity offers an innovative overview of a period (c. 300-700 CE) that has become increasingly central to scholarly debates over the history of western and Middle Eastern civilizations. This volume covers such pivotal events as the fall of Rome, the rise of Christianity, the origins of Islam, and the early formation of Byzantium and the European Middle Ages. These events are set in the context of widespread literary, artistic, cultural, and religious change during the period. The geographical scope of this Handbook is unparalleled among comparable surveys of Late Antiquity; Arabia, Egypt, Central Asia, and the Balkans all receive dedicated treatments, while the scope extends to the western kingdoms, and North Africa in the West. Furthermore, from economic theory and slavery to Greek and Latin poetry, Syriac and Coptic literature, sites of religious devotion, and many others, this Handbook covers a wide range of topics that will appeal to scholars from a diverse array of disciplines. The Oxford Handbook of Late Antiquity engages the perennially valuable questions about the end of the ancient world and the beginning of the medieval, while providing a much-needed touchstone for the study of Late Antiquity itself.

The Origin of the History of Science in Classical Antiquity

Author: Leonid Zhmud
Publisher: Walter de Gruyter
ISBN: 3110194325
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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This volume is the first comprehensive study of the content, form and goal of the Peripatetic historiography of science. The book first analyses similar trends in Presocratic, Sophistic and Platonic thought, and then focuses on Aristotle’s student Eudemos of Rhodes. His work is the basis of the Peripatetic historiography of science which greatly contributed to the development of this genre in medieval Arabia and in Europe in the 16th–18th centuries.