Courting Justice

Author: Joyce Murdoch
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780786730940
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Since 1958, twenty-five men and two women have forced the Supreme Court to consider whether the Constitution's promises of equal protection apply to gay Americans. Here Joyce Murdoch and Deb Price reveal how the nation's highest court has reacted to these cases--from the surprising 1958 victory of a tiny homosexual magazine to the 2000 defeat of a gay Eagle Scout. A triumph of investigative reporting, Courting Justice gives us an inspiring new perspective on the struggle for civil rights in America.

Gay Rights Movement

Author: Stephanie Watson
Publisher: ABDO
ISBN: 161783887X
Format: PDF, Mobi
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In the face of injustice, people band together to work for change. Through their influence, what was once unthinkable becomes common. This title traces the history of the gay rights movement in the United States, including the key players, watershed moments, and legislative battles that have driven social change. Iconic images and informative sidebars accompany compelling text that follows the movement from before the 1969 riots at the Stonewall Inn in New York City through activists� work to end prejudice and up to new legislative triumphs in the twenty-first century. Features include a glossary, selected bibliography, Web sites, source notes, and an index, plus a timeline and essential facts. Aligned to Common Core Standards and correlated to state standards. Essential Library is an imprint of ABDO Publishing Company.

Courts Liberalism and Rights

Author: Jason Pierceson
Publisher: Temple University Press
ISBN: 9781592134021
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Understanding approaches to liberalism through the study of the politics of gay and lesbian rights.

A Year at the Supreme Court

Author: Neal Devins
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822385953
Format: PDF, Kindle
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The United States Supreme Court’s 2002–03 term confounded Court watchers. The same Rehnquist Court that many had seen as solidly conservative and unduly activist—the Court that helped decide the 2000 presidential election and struck down thirty-one federal statutes since 1995—issued a set of surprising, watershed rulings. In a term filled with important and unpredictable decisions, it upheld affirmative action, invalidated a same-sex sodomy statute, and reversed a death sentence due to ineffective assistance of counsel. With essays focused on individual Justices, Court practices, and some of last year’s most important rulings, this volume explores the meaning and significance of the Court’s 2002–03 term. Seasoned Supreme Court advocates and journalists from The New Republic, The Los Angeles Times, Newsweek, National Journal, Slate, and Legal Times grapple with questions about the Rehnquist Court’s identity and the Supreme Court’s role in the political life of the country. Some essays consider the role of “swing” Justices Sandra Day O’Connor and Anthony Kennedy within a Court that divides 5–4 more than any other group of Justices in the nation’s history. Others examine the political reaction to and legal context of the Court’s Lawrence v. Texas decision declaring a Texas law criminalizing homosexual sodomy unconstitutional. Contributors analyze the Court’s rulings on affirmative action and reassess its commitment to states’ rights. Considering the Court’s practices, one advocate explores the use and utility of amicus curiae, or “friend of the court” briefs, while another reflects on indications of an increased openness by the Court to public scrutiny. Two advocates who argued cases before the Court—one related to hate speech and the other to a “three strikes and you’re out” criminal statute—offer vivid accounts of their experiences. Intended for general readers, A Year at the Supreme Court is for all those who want to understand the Rehnquist Court and its momentous 2002–03 term. Contributors Erwin Chemerinsky Neal Devins Davison M. Douglas David J. Garrow Dahlia Lithwick Tony Mauro Carter Phillips Ramesh Ponnuru Jeffrey Rosen David G. Savage Rodney A. Smolla Stuart Taylor Jr.

Dishonorable Passions

Author: William N. Eskridge Jr.
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1440631107
Format: PDF
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From the Pentagon to the wedding chapel, there are few issues more controversial today than gay rights. As William Eskridge persuasively demonstrates in Dishonorable Passions, there is nothing new about this political and legal obsession. The American colonies and the early states prohibited sodomy as the crime against nature, but rarely punished such conduct if it took place behind closed doors. By the twentieth century, America’s emerging regulatory state targeted degenerates and (later) homosexuals. The witch hunts of the McCarthy era caught very few Communists but ruined the lives of thousands of homosexuals. The nation’s sexual revolution of the 1960s fueled a social movement of people seeking repeal of sodomy laws, but it was not until the Supreme Court’s decision in Lawrence v. Texas (2003) that private sex between consenting adults was decriminalized. With dramatic stories of both the hunted (Walt Whitman and Margaret Mead) and the hunters (Earl Warren and J. Edgar Hoover), Dishonorable Passions reveals how American sodomy laws affected the lives of both homosexual and heterosexual Americans. Certain to provoke heated debate, Dishonorable Passions is a must-read for anyone interested in the history of sexuality and its regulation in the United States

And Say Hi to Joyce

Author: Deb Price
Publisher: Doubleday Books
ISBN:
Format: PDF, Mobi
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The writer of the first weekly newspaper column to be written from a gay point of view discusses the struggles of gay couples, gay parents, the AIDS crisis, and other topics, and celebrates individuals admired by the gay community.

Gay Olympian

Author: Tom Waddell
Publisher: Knopf
ISBN:
Format: PDF, ePub
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A biography of homosexual athlete Tom Waddell describes his battle to change gay stereotypes, his role as a founder of the Gay Games, his personal life, and his inspirational final battle with AIDS. 20,000 first printing.

The Most Dangerous Branch

Author: David A. Kaplan
Publisher: Crown
ISBN: 1524759929
Format: PDF, Docs
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In the bestselling tradition of The Nine and The Brethren, The Most Dangerous Branch takes us inside the secret world of the Supreme Court. David A. Kaplan, the former legal affairs editor of Newsweek, shows how the justices subvert the role of the other branches of government—and how we’ve come to accept it at our peril. With the retirement of Justice Anthony Kennedy, the Court has never before been more central in American life. It is the nine justices who too often now decide the controversial issues of our time—from abortion and same-sex marriage, to gun control, campaign finance and voting rights. The Court is so crucial that many voters in 2016 made their choice based on whom they thought their presidential candidate would name to the Court. Donald Trump picked Neil Gorsuch—the key decision of his new administration. The next justice—replacing Anthony Kennedy—will be even more important, holding the swing vote over so much social policy. Is that really how democracy is supposed to work? Based on exclusive interviews with the justices and dozens of their law clerks, Kaplan provides fresh details about life behind the scenes at the Court – Clarence Thomas’s simmering rage, Antonin Scalia’s death, Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s celebrity, Breyer Bingo, the petty feuding between Gorsuch and the chief justice, and what John Roberts thinks of his critics. Kaplan presents a sweeping narrative of the justices’ aggrandizement of power over the decades – from Roe v. Wade to Bush v. Gore to Citizens United, to rulings during the 2017-18 term. But the arrogance of the Court isn’t partisan: Conservative and liberal justices alike are guilty of overreach. Challenging conventional wisdom about the Court’s transcendent power, The Most Dangerous Branch is sure to rile both sides of the political aisle.

Redeeming the Dream

Author: Theodore B. Olson
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0698135369
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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“Breathtakingly inspiring.” —Laurence H. Tribe, Professor of Constitutional Law, Harvard Law School When advocates for marriage equality sought to challenge California’s notorious Proposition 8, they were fortunate to have the support of two of the nation’s preeminent lawyers, David Boies and Theodore B. Olson. Despite the fact that they had argued against one another in the landmark Bush v. Gore case, their commitment to the marriage issue led them to join forces, ultimately defeating the unconstitutional proposition in the Supreme Court after a nearly five-year battle. Redeeming the Dream is the definitive inside account of the key civil rights struggle of our time.

The Case for Same sex Marriage

Author: William N. Eskridge
Publisher:
ISBN:
Format: PDF
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A thought-provoking overview of the issue of gay marriage discusses the history of gay unions, the controversy over the issue, and the implications of gay unions for gay behavior, marriage and the family, and civil rights. 25,000 first printing.